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Old 08-12-2008, 12:26 PM   #11
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I think you need just to list the previous employment & events just so you don't holes but it just is a one liner as it is irrelevant. Your personal statement would pick up on the career change and what you are doing.
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Old 08-12-2008, 12:54 PM   #12
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Your resume should be tailored very directly toward the job you are trying to get.

It should stress skills/education/experience you have that are relevant to the job you are trying to get.

It's not uncommon to have 2 or 3 resumes, each directed at a different position.
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Old 08-12-2008, 12:55 PM   #13
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Chico, you can make reference to your previous career to explain the silver threads. No details necessary. You became a tinker to pursue your passion, leaving your first career behind. No one who is interested in hiring you to sharpen knives will care where you worked as a credit manager or for how long. I would not give employer names or start and end dates for different employers. A simple statement that you worked in the credit field until 200? then switched should be sufficient. If anyone should ask, be prepared to respond with more detail.
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Old 08-12-2008, 01:00 PM   #14
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I used to work for Monster.com. I know back then they had a lot of information on the site about how to write a resume. You might want to check them out as well as the other resume sites like Careerbuilder.com and any of the others.

Go to the library and get a current book on writing resumes. What makes a good resume has changed a lot even since I wrote my first one. What used to be acceptable may no longer be the best idea and what once was not acceptable now could be perfectly common. For instance, when I first learned to write a resume it was extremely important to keep your resume to one page. That is not the case anymore. Recruiters are more than happy to look at a resume that is multiple pages as long as it is relevant to the job you are going after.
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Old 08-12-2008, 01:01 PM   #15
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Try to keep your resume to one page. Most employers won't read more than that. You want to keep your job experience to specific skills you used in each position whether that is supervising others or specific tasks that fell to you to complete. If the computer building was a part of your job description then include it there. If it was "just for fun" then you can list it at the bottom as additional skills you have that may not have been used in your previous jobs. I always included stuff like when I was treasurer or president of the band boosters since that showed leadership and fiscal skills that may not have been used in my job. I also put down what computer programs I was familiar with using. You want to be sure to list your current most recent job first and work backwards and get less detailed the farther in the past you go. References should be co-workers or supervisors who have actually observed your work ethic as well as friends. Try not to use family members. As far as whether to wait for certification before looking for another job, my question would be, Is certification something necessary for the job you want? You also don't state why you want to look for a new job. Could you stay there for a while and be content? The thing about staying long enough for the certification them splitting will make the company think twice about offering to help others get certified.
There are a few reasons for a new job.

1. I feel that i have learned as much as i can being here and that in the next 3 or 4 months i will have learned as much as needed.
2. 11$ an hour doing what im doing and have not had a raise in over a year is ridiculous especially when my friends who have no school behind them are making 13.50$ an hour and they dont even build the PC's, they are just tech over the phone.
3. Building PC's is not my forte, i am a network engineer and its time for me to get hands on experience with hardcore equipment.
4. i cant seem to find my plastic spoons for my soup and its pissin me off, so therefor i must quit this job or find my spoons..
5. I have been here 3 years and i feel there is no future here for me due to the fact of no raises and its not in my area of study BUT building PC's does help me out in my resume.
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Old 08-12-2008, 01:07 PM   #16
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Andy M, yes, I believe in every word you said. In fact, I would recommend much the same action in drafting materials for interviews.

A common thread and problem here for the professionals at Discuss Cooking is that we are essentially doing a service, not creating consumer goods, like a house or an automobile.

The chefs and sous-chefs here make their livings by pleasing your palate. For me it's the 'edge.' (BTW, that's why a chef pays 200 bucks to put an edge on a 50 dollar knife. He cares spit about the blade, he is buying performance.)

And that's the rub. Before a chef (*ahem* who can at times be a bit testy) hands over a 2,000 dollar Hattori or worse yet, a one-of-kind custom from Hiroo Itou) he wants to know you won't drag it on a rough sidewalk.

In the past, sometimes I acually bought a Japanese knife and just carried it with me.
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Old 08-12-2008, 01:15 PM   #17
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Chico - perhaps you should get those you have worked for write a short note of recommendation that you can include in a brochure. You could also give them a discount if they recommend you to someone else who uses your services.
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Old 08-12-2008, 01:18 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Chico Buller View Post
Andy M, yes, I believe in every word you said. In fact, I would recommend much the same action in drafting materials for interviews.

A common thread and problem here for the professionals at Discuss Cooking is that we are essentially doing a service, not creating consumer goods, like a house or an automobile.

The chefs and sous-chefs here make their livings by pleasing your palate. For me it's the 'edge.' (BTW, that's why a chef pays 200 bucks to put an edge on a 50 dollar knife. He cares spit about the blade, he is buying performance.)

And that's the rub. Before a chef (*ahem* who can at times be a bit testy) hands over a 2,000 dollar Hattori or worse yet, a one-of-kind custom from Hiroo Itou) he wants to know you won't drag it on a rough sidewalk.

In the past, sometimes I acually bought a Japanese knife and just carried it with me.

Are you expecting to do your business via mail or in person?
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Old 08-12-2008, 01:26 PM   #19
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Are you expecting to do your business via mail or in person?
My wife and I don't know yet, we just made the switch to 24/7 kitchen knife sharpening. In fact, I still have some sport knives to finish.

Miniman, recommendations are always welcomed. But I once loaned out my personal butakiri to a sous-chef who was breaking down a large leg of beef--removing the silver and all.

When I next saw the knife, the head chef had it. It was making the rounds.

These stories are what struck me about the OP's concerns. So much of what we do is better experienced that read about on a dry sheet of paper.

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Old 08-12-2008, 01:28 PM   #20
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I used to work for Monster.com. I know back then they had a lot of information on the site about how to write a resume. You might want to check them out as well as the other resume sites like Careerbuilder.com and any of the others.

Go to the library and get a current book on writing resumes. What makes a good resume has changed a lot even since I wrote my first one. What used to be acceptable may no longer be the best idea and what once was not acceptable now could be perfectly common. For instance, when I first learned to write a resume it was extremely important to keep your resume to one page. That is not the case anymore. Recruiters are more than happy to look at a resume that is multiple pages as long as it is relevant to the job you are going after.
i went there today for some tips and i also found this site.
How to Write a Resume | Free Resume Builder

not sure how well up to date it is.
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