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Old 09-14-2007, 03:04 PM   #11
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Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Sunny Florida
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You don't necessarily have to seek out another professional to fix it as there is only really so much they can do. The main thing is that they will sell you a leave in conditioner or a conditioning treatment. For over processed hair, there isn't really a way to "process" it back. You just have to condition the holy heck out of it and with a bit of time and some TLC it will get better.

I like Paul Mitchell's "The Conditioner". Nexxus has (had?) some great conditioners, "Keraphix" and "Humectress" - but I don't know if it's the same as it used to be. (They changed their formula and opened themselves up to selling to the public. Boo.) Redkin also makes some good products.

The main things you want to look for in a conditioner is that it is compatible for your hair type, smells good to you and is a professional grade product. You can either go to any salon that sells product or go to some Sally Beauty Supply (or some other one that's open to the public.)

I have fine hair also and I recently over processed my own hair... long story but I put in some temporary hair color for a costume party and then had to strip it out. Paul Mitchell has been my savior. It brings my hair back to soft and bouncy instead of dry and frizzy. I tend to put in a generous amount - a little under a half tablespoon (my hair is shoulder length and not thick). One application trick is to lightly towel dry your hair after application so you pull out the excess - keeps your hair from getting weighed down and greasy feeling.

(I'm not a professional but I grew up in a family of hair dressers. )

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Old 09-14-2007, 03:05 PM   #12
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Antonio, Texas
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I feel for you, Texasgirl. My hair is like that all the time!

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Old 09-15-2007, 07:30 PM   #13
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Thank you so much everyone!
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Old 09-16-2007, 09:52 AM   #14
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Hi Texasgirl, I am a hairdresser and with what you've described, there aren't many options for you. If it's over processed, it's over processed. There are products that can help, but if honesty is the best policy, they are only temp cover ups and involve professional products like Lanza/Nex/Redk/Matrx/PM/Seb/etc. PM has a foaming styling cream but since your hair is so fine, after buying it from your HD [as I don't think it's available to the public] you'd use only about the size of a pea on your wet palm and then massage it into your wet/towel dried hair. If you use too much, you'll be in for a mess as once it's there, it's there. My customers used to grab it for themselves when I left my station and palm it into their hair, like quarters' size worth, and then their hair was ruined. So beware. Another product is Emergency and one is called 9/11.

My hair is very thick, very curly, very coarse and almost impossible to ruin but very thin fine hair is very easy to mess up.

I would get a spray bottle that is about 1 cup of bottled water, get it pretty warm [as it has a better change of getting into your] put in there 1 teaspoon olive oil [good quality] and give the sprayer a good shake, very vigorously, then spray your wet hair with this, use a plastic shower cap and leave on for an hour or more. Olive oil is way larger than the cuticle of your hair therefore, most won't be able to penetrate but the little tiny amount that can, is an old addage from years ago as a quick/healthy fix for deep conditioning frizz control.

Good luck.

...Trials travel best when you're taking the transportation known as prayer...SLRC
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