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Old 08-17-2013, 04:27 AM   #21
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Lol Taxy !!! Lots of places here will,lay claim to having the best clotted cream it all tastes the same to me, very rich . Perfect with strawberries .
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Old 08-19-2013, 12:51 AM   #22
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most of the recipes for clotted cream that I have seen call for whole milk. whole milk, i'm assuming, is milk that is not homogenized. is that right? if the milk is labeled 'whole' milk, it is non-homogenized? also, I see that I have access to 'organic, grass-fed whole milk'. is this a better choice than plain whole milk? oh, and all our store bought milk today is pasteurized, right?

goddess, i'm amazed at how many Virginia towns have tearooms like you were suggesting as places where to find authentic clotted cream. there are some 30 or 40 listings, but the closest ones to me are at least 40 minutes away. but thanks....:)
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Old 08-19-2013, 01:07 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by vitauta View Post
most of the recipes for clotted cream that I have seen call for whole milk. whole milk, i'm assuming, is milk that is not homogenized. is that right? if the milk is labeled 'whole' milk, it is non-homogenized? also, I see that I have access to 'organic, grass-fed whole milk'. is this a better choice than plain whole milk? oh, and all our store bought milk today is pasteurized, right?

goddess, i'm amazed at how many Virginia towns have tearooms like you were suggesting as places where to find authentic clotted cream. there are some 30 or 40 listings, but the closest ones to me are at least 40 minutes away. but thanks....:)
In Quebec whole milk is usually 3.8% mf, while homo milk is usually 3.25%. Both are pasteurized.
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Old 08-20-2013, 02:29 AM   #24
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I just did a Google search for "homemade clotted cream" and came up with a number of hits. Just for fun, you might try making your own before springing for other stuff. Might be a fun experiment. And, just think, you will get to eat the failures and successes. Where's the downside to that?!
When I made it, it was very easy to make--this was when I was in my 20s and not the 'experienced' cook I am today. But, I got the "top cream" from my then boyfriend. That is the cream that is at the top of the milk. If I remember correctly, it was raw.
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Old 08-26-2013, 10:15 PM   #25
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I have heard of clotted cream and believe my Grandmother used it on fresh berries and deserts. I also went to ''Wiki'' and it was explained how and where it is made.''Wiki'' sends you to a manufacturer in the U.K. Rodda's of Redruth Cornwall U.K. [roddas.co.uk] They have all types of recipes. I haven't made ''Creme Fraiche'' in quite a few years but remember how ''nutty'' it tasted. Not quite the same as ''Clotted Cream''. This company also makes it.The reason it isn't shipped much is because of its short shelf life. We made our own C. F. but most places opt for commercial sour or whipped cream because the old French Process calls for leaving it the counter overnight.Not always a safe result depending on several circumstances[Temp,Time,Bacteria, Ect]. Hope this helps, Interesting Item.
Clotted cream is a speciality of Devon and Cornwall. Although it was sometimes made elsewhere on farms in the old days when they processed their own milk. It's quite a fag to make and not really viable to make it successfully at home

Have a look at "Kelly's of Cornwall's" website where it gives a fairly in-depth account of the methods. "Kelly's Of Cornwall" make the most divine ice cream using clotted cream. "Rodda's" clotted cream is widely available in British supermarkets and is gorgeous slathered onto scones with home-made strawberry jam.

I'm surprised that no enterprising company in the US has produced it in the US
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Old 08-26-2013, 10:34 PM   #26
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most of the recipes for clotted cream that I have seen call for whole milk. whole milk, i'm assuming, is milk that is not homogenized. is that right? if the milk is labeled 'whole' milk, it is non-homogenized? also, I see that I have access to 'organic, grass-fed whole milk'. is this a better choice than plain whole milk? oh, and all our store bought milk today is pasteurized, right?

goddess, i'm amazed at how many Virginia towns have tearooms like you were suggesting as places where to find authentic clotted cream. there are some 30 or 40 listings, but the closest ones to me are at least 40 minutes away. but thanks....:)
]"Whole milk" is full-fat milk, as opposed to skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. It can be homogenized or not, although in the UK it is very difficult to find non-homogenised these days. I would think that homogenised milk wouldn't make clotted cream because it's treated to suspend the cream throughout the rest of the milk and won't separate into cream and skimmed milk.

Perhaps I'm biased but I think the organic milk from grass-fed cows is bound to be better than the factory-farmed milk from cows which rarely see the light of day and are mainly fed on manufactured and probably GM feedstuffs.
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Old 08-26-2013, 11:21 PM   #27
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]"Whole milk" is full-fat milk, as opposed to skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. It can be homogenized or not, although in the UK it is very difficult to find non-homogenised these days. I would think that homogenised milk wouldn't make clotted cream because it's treated to suspend the cream throughout the rest of the milk and won't separate into cream and skimmed milk.

Perhaps I'm biased but I think the organic milk from grass-fed cows is bound to be better than the factory-farmed milk from cows which rarely see the light of day and are mainly fed on manufactured and probably GM feedstuffs.
Definitely is. Here in Ontario, farmers can't sell raw milk (and we can't buy it). I have gotten raw milk for my dogs in the past, but the cream was removed.
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Old 08-26-2013, 11:48 PM   #28
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I'm surprised that no enterprising company in the US has produced it in the US
I've often thought the same thing about doughnuts in the UK, although I understand that Krispy Kreme now has a few scattered locations.

Seriously, I suspect people in the US would probably be put off by the name. You have to admit the word "clot" has a bit of an image problem. Now if some marketing wiz were to come up with a clever name, it would undoubtedly sell like hotcakes over here.
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:43 PM   #29
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i dunno, steve, the name, 'clotted cream' is what initially sparked my interest....i finally found a source for whole milk that is organic, grass-fed, and non-homogenized!! it comes from the 'trickling springs creamery', located in chambersburg, pa. it costs about $11 per gallon, and comes in returnable glass bottles, just like those some of us oldsters remember from the days when milk was regularly delivered to your doorstep....
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:51 PM   #30
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i dunno, steve, the name, 'clotted cream' is what initially sparked my interest....i finally found a source for whole milk that is organic, grass-fed, and non-homogenized!! it comes from the 'trickling springs creamery', located in chambersburg, pa. it costs about $11 per gallon, and comes in returnable glass bottles, just like those some of us oldsters remember from the days when milk was regularly delivered to your doorstep....
I have read that it takes a gallon of milk to yield a cup of clotted cream is that correct?
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