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Old 06-20-2015, 10:58 AM   #1
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Japanese cooks

Hello,

I heard (and read) in Japan the apprenticeship of a cook lasts for 9 years!



I couldn't even imagine to be an apprentice for 9 years! In Germany most apprentices quit prematurely although they only need to learn for 3 years...


A German chef who had worked in Hongkong told me that Asian cooks are actually superior...

What do you think about all that? Should a chef-to-be go to Japan instead of France or Italy?

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Old 06-20-2015, 11:14 AM   #2
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...Should a chef-to-be go to Japan instead of France or Italy?
If a chef wanted to learn Japanese cooking, using Japanese equipment and foods, yes. If you want to learn French or Italian cooking, they should not.
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Old 06-20-2015, 01:56 PM   #3
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I don't think an apprenticeship of 9 years would put me off if I wanted to be a classically trained professional chef. It took me several years of school and many years in various entry level or mid level positions to become a so called "expert" in my field. To me it was no big deal, just part of the journey. These days it seems like everyone wants to start at the top and fake it while hanging on for dear life!

As far as where to go, I would start where you are and earn as you learn. Each time you outgrow a place move on and hopefully move up.

Go to the library and check out Jacques Pepin's autobiography.

The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen: Jacques Pépin: 9780618444113: Amazon.com: Books

Good luck!

EDIT: I just found this article wanted to include it.

http://www.foodandwine.com/blogs/lif...ow_facebook_fw
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Old 06-22-2015, 12:54 PM   #4
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If a chef wanted to learn Japanese cooking, using Japanese equipment and foods, yes. If you want to learn French or Italian cooking, they should not.
Hello,

what I learned people study French or Italian cooking because they consider either the one or the other the best way of cooking at all. I feel it is their firm belief which provides the determination that is required to go through all the trouble to become a great chef. I don't think a maître like for example Jacques Pépin would be happy if he doubted he had chosen the best of all kinds of "cuisine".
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Old 06-22-2015, 12:59 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Joachim View Post
Hello,

what I learned people study French or Italian cooking because they consider either the one or the other the best way of cooking at all. I feel it is their firm belief which provides the determination that is required to go through all the trouble to become a great chef. I don't think a maître like for example Jacques Pépin would be happy if he doubted he had chosen the best of all kinds of "cuisine".

I disagree. I believe an aspiring chef usually chooses the cuisine he is most familiar with. JP grew up in France, it's reasonable to assume he would want to cook in the style of French chefs.

Of course, a person who grew up in France may become intrigued with Chinese or Indian cooking and travel to China/India to learn there.

Not because it's "The best kind of cooking" but because they are especially interested in it. It's not a contest just a preference.
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Old 06-23-2015, 01:10 PM   #6
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I thought the extended Japanese apprenticeship was for sushi chefs?
Like the three years of only making rice to get it down pat!
Seems I saw something on this very subject.
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Old 06-23-2015, 03:55 PM   #7
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Here's a good documentary about a sushi chef. You can watch it on many of the streaming sites like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon..

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (Official Movie Site) - Directed by David Gelb - Available on DVD and Blu-ray? - Trailer, Pictures & More
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Old 06-23-2015, 05:13 PM   #8
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I disagree. I believe an aspiring chef usually chooses the cuisine he is most familiar with. JP grew up in France, it's reasonable to assume he would want to cook in the style of French chefs.

Of course, a person who grew up in France may become intrigued with Chinese or Indian cooking and travel to China/India to learn there.

Not because it's "The best kind of cooking" but because they are especially interested in it. It's not a contest just a preference.
Actually, the majority of culinary schools primarily teach "classical cuisine," which is French. The curriculum usually includes sections on International Cuisines, but the emphasis is French.
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Old 06-23-2015, 05:18 PM   #9
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Actually, the majority of culinary schools primarily teach "classical cuisine," which is French. The curriculum usually includes sections on International Cuisines, but the emphasis is French cuisine.
OK, but first you have to choose the cuisine you're interested in. If you live in France and have an all consuming desire to be a sushi chef, you're going to pursue the appropriate education.
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Old 06-23-2015, 05:29 PM   #10
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Just speaking about Americans, it's expensive enough to go to culinary school, much less travel to another country for several years of training. In general, if people go to culinary school, they'll be taught classical French cuisine with others as more of an add-on and get specific cuisine training in the restaurants they choose to apply to.
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