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Old 08-13-2006, 11:05 PM   #51
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That's for sure, Half-Baked!!

If you've ever been to a pub in the British Isles---OMG---the varieties of beers and ales are to die for--------American beers tend to pale in comparison, though not bad, just not in the same league. My humble opinion. Pass me a pint, please.
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Old 08-14-2006, 12:26 AM   #52
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boy, did you say a mugful expatgirl.

once, america was in the forefront of beers, in both quality and production. of course many german, belgian, english and irish beers have always been world class (i left out canadian just to annoy them... )
a little over a century ago, mechanization from the industrial revolution - with all of it's socio-economic effects on the country, and a large german emmigration to the u.s. created a boom in beer. men like adolphus busch, frederick pabst, george ehret, jacob ruppert, joseph schlitz, and philip best created beers that won gold medals in every beer competition around the world.

but prohibition, the temperence movement, and an anti-german sentiment after wwI was the end of the great years in american brewing.

the bright side is that in the last 20 years, many small breweries are springing up as a market grows for higher quality beers. hopefully, we're in the beginning of a new era of what will become another great beer age.
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Old 08-14-2006, 04:51 AM   #53
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OK, I'll inject a little food history here. Once upon a time, many years ago (i.e., when I was in my 20s), Coors was only available legally west of the Rockies! It was because the company insisted that the beer be refridgerated, and that's as far as refridgerated trucks could go. I lived at the time in North Dakota, but we had a HQ in Colorado Springs. So when someone had a TDY (Temporary Duty) at that location, every one would pitch in for tons of ice and Coors.
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Old 08-14-2006, 09:29 AM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Half Baked
People certainly love their own brand, for sure.
Well I do try!! But it's been far too long since I've made any, and I'm starting to run low and, um.., you weren't talking about making your own brand of beer, where you?

John
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Old 08-15-2006, 12:31 AM   #55
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that's it ronjohn?

no comment about my historical retrospective of beer? nothing? nada?

i'm depressed. i am totally not going to enjoy the next six pack of your homebrew you send me all that much.

and i looked all of that stuff up to impress you. you unappreciative b!tch...

i'm gonna have wine...
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Old 08-15-2006, 08:21 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
that's it ronjohn?

no comment about my historical retrospective of beer? nothing? nada?

i'm depressed. i am totally not going to enjoy the next six pack of your homebrew you send me all that much.

and i looked all of that stuff up to impress you. you unappreciative b!tch...

i'm gonna have wine...
What, you wanted me to delve into how the alkaline waters of some regions made darker beers a better choice, or how India Pale Ale came about as a means of making beer that withstand the journey around the cape from England to India? Or how classic american pilsner was developed using corn because the six row barley that the settlers had access to here in the US had such a high protien content that they needed to cut it with something?

What's that have to do with "letdown" foods?

John
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