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Old 06-27-2008, 05:50 PM   #21
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The first hit in a very quick google search gave me this url: LED Light Bulbs

The LED lightbulbs on the site come in shapes and sizes for all kinds of applications and aren't nearly as expensive as I thought they were. They look to me like a great product. Of course, I haven't had the chance to try any of them and so can't say for sure, but you can bet that I just might pick up a couple over the next year or so. I mean, can you imagine putting a couple of these in your hallway and never having to worry about changing a bulb again, and the energy savings over the course of the fixture would more than justify their modest cost, IMHO.

Seeeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-27-2008, 07:53 PM   #22
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Thanks all. Will pass the posts on to the neighbors.
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Old 06-27-2008, 09:56 PM   #23
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Fisher's Mom - Don't know what you have for a big light, you can use a sodium vapor light, they run for very cheap, all night. The color is a bit funny, but, for your purposes, it doesn't matter.

I have had my garage robbed twice. the last time, after telling me that he had 23 years on the force, the investigating office told me that I should do something about thievery. I kind of thought that was what he was for.

Anyway, I now have security lights all around the property. They come in with motion. I am safe so far.

Quicksilver - if everyone went to motion sensors, if possible, both objectives would be met. Light would be there as long as there was motion and since they would be off when there was no motion, electricity can be saved.
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Old 06-28-2008, 04:53 AM   #24
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the sensor assembly and switching Triac will draw a very minute amount of current with or without a bulb being there, but it`s only miliamps.
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Old 06-28-2008, 11:18 AM   #25
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Thanks, but I don't know how one would do a motion sensor with a post light. I've never seen just a "eye" to hook up to the wiring like for a "light" sensor.
And doesn't the on/off, on/off shorten the life of the bulb.
Mine, as well as all the neighbors' would go on/off all night because of the palm fronds swaying all night.

As for LED bulbs, I haven't seen them for candleabra base bulbs either.

As for sodium vapor. They cost mucho $$$$$. With one of them, I could light up the neighborhood, and be seen from outerspace! - No candleabra base either. And that bluish-gray glare - or are they pinkish?
Our houses are 1 story, probably 12' at peek, no attics.
We'd be lighting the coal mines in Pa! Ha!

Thanks for the add, guys.
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Old 06-28-2008, 01:09 PM   #26
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By candleabra base do you mean the light bulbs that are shaped like candles? If so the ones I have in my ceiling fans are 25w instead of the 40w. Same size as the 40w too, but of course that is less light as well.
In the case of my ceiling fans, doesn't matter as it takes three of them. But I prefer burning at 75w instead of 120w! I have done that averywhere in my home. Single bulb fixtures are on 40w bulbs and multiple bulb fixtures have 25w bulbs. But the 25w candle style bulbs I have fit in the same fixture as a regular bulb.
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Old 06-28-2008, 01:17 PM   #27
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With a light sensor, then that would draw minimum current even when off. LED's are great, but because they draw so little current they MAY not be suitable in that application. For instance I have coloured led mr16 fitment bulbs around the house, including colour changing ones. Typically these will last 30,000 hours and consume ONLY 2 watts BUT you need special low voltage converters that work at that low power consumption.

You might be better off looking at compact flourescent lights - cheap, last longer than a normal bulb and 11 watts is really bright enough, however the downside is that these often have mercury content so they are not as environmentally friendly as they are sometimes made out to be

hth

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Old 06-28-2008, 01:57 PM   #28
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The site I provided in my last post had LED bulbs that fit in ordinary light fixtures, as well as in bulbs that were designed for candleabra fixtures. They also had flood lights, lights suitable for outdoor lighting, etc. They have a complete line of lights, even for tailights on trucks, cars, and mortocycles. I don't believe they are a manufacturer of bulbs, but a distributer of many different LED bulbs. At least give it a look. LED's last a long, long time, and draw very little current. And unlike compact flourescents, they are instant on and require no balast (compact flourescents have the ballast built in.). The other advantage of LED's is that there is no mercury in them as there is in flourescent bulbs. So I think they are worth a look.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-28-2008, 02:06 PM   #29
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I don't know if candleabra base is the correct term, but yes MAV, that is the base for those candle shaped looking bulbs. But my bulbs are clear, round chubby looking bulbs with that base - incandescent 25 watts. I use 3 in that fixture. I tried to get 15s, but couldn't find.
Regular incandescent bulbs have a "medium base" (size). These terms are what the Home Depot guy called them. As opposed to F8 or A19s.
NIge, I have compact florescents in the house - every fixture, but they don't come in candleabra base yet. At least that I can find.
Big enery savers, and alot cooler, which really is the reason I converted.
Home depot will take expired compact flors, when expired.
I called our town sanitation to find out how to dispose of them - and regular alkaline batteries. They said to just through them out. I didn't like their answer and found out H.D. takes them.
I don't know about LOWES. I don't shop there as it's 28 miles away. H.D. 9.
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Old 06-28-2008, 06:34 PM   #30
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Candelabra base refers to the size of the screw in portion. It's the size usedmost often in wayfarers' candles (Christmas window candles).
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