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Old 08-12-2009, 12:28 PM   #21
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Question for those: How many cooking mistakes did you observe? Not sure the continuity editors were chefs.
How intriguing....what mistakes? I'll have to watch it again. I was so into the story line that I missed it all.[/quote]

Have to admit I missed them as well. A chef friend pointed out to me there were a few gaffs -- some that were quite obvious. That's why I asked to see if there are more observant people than me.

The other question would be "what products were displayed" which is the new mode for advertising. Le Cresuet was the most obvious (wonder what they paid for this) but who were the others?
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Old 08-12-2009, 12:33 PM   #22
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Has anyone cooked any Julia recipes? I would be interested to hear what you think. Trying to decide if I should buy her book.
I have both Volumes 1 & 2 of "Mastering the Art of French Cooking". But the cookbook I use the very most (to the point where it's literally falling apart) is Julia Child's "The Way To Cook". I'd definitely recommend anyone interested in Julia's take on food with a newer & fresher approach run out & add this book to their cookbook library. It easily becomes a "go to" bible for good everyday food with Julia flair, unlike "Mastering". Don't get me wrong, I love reading & rereading "Mastering" & have made a number of the recipes. It's just not something I utilize very often.

"The Way To Cook" by Julia Child - buy it. You'll not only love it, but better still you'll use it regularly. (The "Steam-Roasted Goose with Port Wine Gravy" has been our Xmas dinner since the book was originally published!)
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Old 08-12-2009, 12:43 PM   #23
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My wife used this for years but finally gave it away (something to do with limited shelf space) and used Pepin's book for awhile and this has given way to others (most of which get ripped apart and stored in her recipe file).

But Julia's book(s) got us started on the path toward creative and good cooking. Otherwise it might be Hamburger Helper. What a thought!
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Old 08-12-2009, 02:52 PM   #24
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Question for those: How many cooking mistakes did you observe? Not sure the continuity editors were chefs.
?? The chef for the movie was Susan Spungen, who used to run Martha Stewart's operation. She's top notch.

I thought the food looked delicious, but I was following the two stories. The food was a prop for me.
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Old 08-12-2009, 02:55 PM   #25
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yes.... I cooked from Mastering in the 60's and early 70's, but the Julia book of mine that's the most worn is "From Julia Child's Kitchen." It was her first solo book, and came after the two Masterings. I also "overuse" "The Way to Cook."

Breezy, do you also do her Buche de Noel for Christmas?
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Old 08-12-2009, 03:31 PM   #26
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The food was a prop for me as well and I am not the technical cook in this family

I still need to figure out how to de-bone a duck and I want to know how to keep my knives as sharp as Julie's in the duck scene all the time. My wife can go through an edge in a day it seems.
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Old 08-12-2009, 04:15 PM   #27
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Breezy, do you also do her Buche de Noel for Christmas?
No - haven't done that one yet. To tell you the truth, normally Xmas is just hubby & I, & we're so stuffed from snacking & the big goose dinner that dessert rarely rears its ugly head.

My biggest claim to fame re: fabulous Xmas desserts for a large group was doing Martha Stewart's "Crocembouche" - 75 little cream puffs stuffed with chocolate rum creme & stuck together via caramel in a pyramid/Xmas tree shape. Then the whole shebang wreathed in layers of finely spun caramelized sugar.

If we'd had a gas oven, I seriously would have considered sticking my head in it by the end of the ordeal.
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Old 08-12-2009, 04:57 PM   #28
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The Buche is actually not difficult! Time consuming, but not hard to do. For many years I taught a "HOliday Treasures" dessert class in Boston, and Julia's Buche was part of it, including the meringue mushrooms dusted with cocoa. Always a huge hit.
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Old 08-12-2009, 06:24 PM   #29
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Was this the one where Martha threw the sugar into the air and it expanded into fine threads of sugar shape in a cone?

It seems to me she threw everything up in the air and had it spin around a tree shaped cone. Then when it cooled and solidified she could carefully lift it into place around the cream puffs. I only saw this once so memory may not be any good. But I remembered thinking at the time that any home cook that would try that was "nuts" Only Martha could get away with throwing sugar around the house expecting it to come down where she planned instead of all over the kitchen, dining room and any where else you could imagine.
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Old 08-13-2009, 01:26 PM   #30
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Was this the one where Martha threw the sugar into the air and it expanded into fine threads of sugar shape in a cone?

It seems to me she threw everything up in the air and had it spin around a tree shaped cone. Then when it cooled and solidified she could carefully lift it into place around the cream puffs. I only saw this once so memory may not be any good. But I remembered thinking at the time that any home cook that would try that was "nuts" Only Martha could get away with throwing sugar around the house expecting it to come down where she planned instead of all over the kitchen, dining room and any where else you could imagine.
Not exactly.

What you do is assemble your little filled cream puffs in the shape of a pyramid, sticking them together with your caramelized sugar.
You then melt/caramelize additional sugar, & when it's at the correct temp, you use a fork or a snipped whisk (which is what I used) to lift the sugar out in long golden strands & cover/swirl the cream puff pyramid with them. There's absolutely no throwing or tossing involved. One doesn't toss mad-hot sugar around unless one wants to visit the ER - lol. Apart from hot oil, very few things are hotter than melted sugar. It is true, however, that you can spin sugar over oiled "molds" & then place them over desserts. Luckily this one doesn't require that extra step.

Anyway - it turned out absolutely gorgeous, but serving was another matter altogether. All that crispy sugar does make elegant service a bit difficult. I felt I should have offered my guests complementary dental appointments for the following day.

And another caveat? Keep the weather in mind if thinking of making this dessert. I was asked to repeat this extravaganza for a New Year's Eve party, & it was humid & rainy that night, thus making the spun sugar difficult to deal with & much less lovely.
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