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Old 03-08-2011, 04:36 AM   #1
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New Puppy

OK, I'm sort of abandoning my Italian Greyhound line to have people remind me what it is like to have a new, young, dog. I spent so many years in geriatric dog care that I really don't remember some things. Like chewing. Thank heaven for my 10 year old neighbor who showed up with a chew toy for her. She's part hound of some sort, about 8 mos old, 15 lbs. Thank Heaven also that she is already crate trained, although the crate they "gave" me with the dog (it costs $175 to adopt a dog from Safe Haven, and we upped it to $200 because she has all her shots, is fixed, is up to date with Frontline and heartguard, my vet has accepted her without an exam (this simply means that my vet or one of her associates already did the surgery and gave the Rx and shots). Anyway, the crate is a little on the small side, so I'll go buy one slightly larger and re-donate this one back to Safe Haven. She seems very personable, but obviously will need some training since she decided to poop inside the front door (she'll go out to pee, then come in). One deciding factor is that she looks a lot like our last dog (a JR mix), but is much calmer.

Anyway, any hints about training and such will be a big help. It's been about .... well, almost 20 years since I had puppies.

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Old 03-08-2011, 06:03 AM   #2
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Best hints: Be patient. Be firm. Be consistent. And reward and praise.
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Old 03-08-2011, 06:37 AM   #3
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What I always tell people who have gotten a puppy or adolescent dog, after having had an older dog that they have lived years with, is that sometimes you forget how much work it was to raise that perfect dog.
Cesar Milan recommends NOT giving a dog adopted from a shelter situation (or did your come from a foster home?) full run of the house. He says it overwhelms their brain. I would recommend keeping her nearby, too, much like you would an 8 week old puppy. You may not recognize her signs to go outside yet and she may not be on your schedule yet.

Pictures?!
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:42 AM   #4
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Oh I'm so happy for you Claire! Remember to play play play. Young pups need lots of play time.

My one piece of advice is to be vigilant in interrupting behaviour you don't like. It will be tiring at first but well worth it later.
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Old 03-08-2011, 02:35 PM   #5
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No, she was crate trained at the shelter, and will be crated at night or when we are not home. I agree, the more space she has to be bored in when alone, the more trouble she'll get into. I had the good fortune of getting my first dog when we were assigned to Hawaii -- we knew she'd eventually have to be shipped, so a breeder friend immediately gave me instructions on crate training, and it is the best thing you can do for a pet.

Are you ready for this? I don't even own a camera! When you're in your 50s and 60s, don't have kids/grands, don't live near family .... just don't even own one,much less know how to attach! I am going to email computer guy and ask him to bring a camera and help me post, since my friends are all dying to see her. We were determined NOT to get another doggie until we see Michigan (the only state of the 49 we haven't seen). Oh, well.

Although she looks a lot like my last JR, she is much calmer and immediately decided this was home. Today I took her for a walk for the first time (my husband did the duties a couple times yesterday) and she immediately knew where home was; that's a good start.

Yes, after spending the past few years with geriatric dogs, I've kinda forgotten how much energy an 8 month old has! today was Puppy shopping day; I still had a collar and expandible lease, but not a regular one, and I forgot about chewing!!! Holey Moley! Toys to fetch, toys to chew. Neighbor gal brought her over a small donut shaped rawhide chew and she totally consumed it over night!

No, I don't think she's ever been in a home at all. She was at the Dubuque Humane society for as long as they keep a dog, then rather than put her down they asked Safe Haven to take her. We discovered her about a week after she moved there, took a week to discuss adoption (yes, we know the commitment of a young dog), then it took a couple of days for the adoption to go through. But I think she's spent her entire life in a humane society and is really just happy. I suspect she'll gain maybe a pound or so before maturity, but as I said, no way she's a greyhound, Italian, Whippet or Full. She has those kind of "fly away" ears, but isn't delicate at all. Her coloring I would call brindle if she had a black background color. She's white with reddish-brown speckles, a coloring I've seen on hunting dogs around here.
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Old 03-08-2011, 02:50 PM   #6
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I've seen second chance dogs make excellent pets. It seems like they try harder or something. Always very sweet.
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:21 PM   #7
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yeah, she's my first humane society dog (done cats, humane society or feral adoptions before, my first dog was purchased, and we bred her and her puppy was our second, and we kept them through very ancient age). She seems very, very eager to please. Right now tendency to nibble digits and chins is being dealt with. She knows "NO", and somewhere along the line someone told me to take her muzzle in hand from above to stop biting and excessive licking. It worked with my two other dogs. One actually was considerably smarter than the other, and she learned "no kisses". This one seems pretty bright as well. She's just getting confident. A bit taller than my JRs were, so I have to watch table manners and fence leaping. I'm inclined to simply tie her up, hubby wants to train her to stay inside the fence line. We don't allow pets to be outside when we aren't home, but there's always that one time (some of you know the saga of Keiki).

Anyway, she was afraid to fall asleep yesterday, but is getting secure, and is sleeping on her blanket (all my dogs loved crochetted afghans, and she's no exception) by my feet. Hubby says when I was gone that's what she did as well.
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Old 03-08-2011, 05:00 PM   #8
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aww..warms my heart.
i agree with the praise and reward poster.
awww no kisses!! that's my favorite part of coming home to my pup... :)
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Old 03-08-2011, 09:18 PM   #9
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i don't think it is fair to tie a dog up all the time. surely you did not mean that. how tall is your fence. or you could get the fence line charged device. my son got one for a beagle that wandered and could get out , no matter how many times he fills holes. this works , i understand it is not much of a shock and his dog avoids the fence line.
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Old 03-08-2011, 09:42 PM   #10
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i also don't agree that leads are a good idea. i'm also a firm believer that zapping a dog is a good idea either. Teaching a dog to stay in it's area is key, there is a lot of time and training involved. Personally i feel like you should be able to keep your dog inside if you can't watch them. Practice a lot of recall and i'm sure the pup will listen in time.
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