"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > The Back Porch > Off Topic Discussions
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-31-2007, 11:32 AM   #11
Head Chef
 
lulu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: England
Posts: 2,039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
I'm just going to sit here and giggle. Poor fishy and chicky, not so healthy are they? Heehee! You know Vera, one of the things I appreciate about you is the random thoughts you post. Thanks!
I agree.

I have been thinking about this one all day. And I found an important exception to Vera's "rules"....OYSTERS! I would not want to eat one of those big raw beauties that was not alive and healthy!
__________________

__________________
In omnibus amor et iustum
lulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2007, 04:58 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
VeraBlue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: northern NJ
Posts: 3,683
Well, I surely do thank everyone who got to thinking about this a bit...and indeed, welcome to my head!

Not for a second do I believe anyone will change their vernacular as a result of my little post..but you did give it a moment's thought, yes?

Now...who asked me if I'd broil a fish? Alive? sure, why not..?

How do you all feel about the word 'up' at the end of a sentence? As in: I'm going to tear it up. Or Stir it up. Why not just say tear it, or stir it? What does the word 'up' have to do with it??

heheehehe
__________________

__________________
How can we sleep while our beds are burning???
VeraBlue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2007, 05:05 PM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
Vera, please don't tell me you're one of those people who, when you ask, "How are you?", you reply, "I'm well, thanks."

Yes, it's more correct grammatically (most of us aren't that "good" all the time, except for Eric Clapton and Mother Teresa and so forth), but criminee, we're talkin' conversational English here!

I wrangle with written English every day, in which precision and clarity are rather important (just ask our clients who are complying with some EPA rule), but I am less fastidious when it comes to jabbering with my acquaintances.

When they ask me to give a speech at the UN, I'll be a little more careful in my rhetorical choices.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2007, 05:14 PM   #14
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 605
How do you all feel about the word 'up' at the end of a sentence? As in: I'm going to tear it up. Or Stir it up. Why not just say tear it, or stir it? What does the word 'up' have to do with it??

It's an unnecessary preposition (some would actually label it an adverb here). Same problem as ending a sentence with "at," as in, "Where do you live at?" with which some of us had fun on GB's grammar thread.

Similarly, a super common goof is to insert the word "over" in a sentence such as "I'm coming over to your house." I make this mistake all the time. I should say, "I'm coming to your house." Usually, though, I find myself abbreviating it to, "I'm coming over," so in that case, I have a dilemma.
__________________
suzyQ3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2007, 05:14 PM   #15
DC's Angel
 
Buck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Bardwell. Kentucky USA
Posts: 1,500
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue
How do you all feel about the word 'up' at the end of a sentence? As in: I'm going to tear it up. Or Stir it up. Why not just say tear it, or stir it? What does the word 'up' have to do with it??

heheehehe
Vera, I have used this construction all my life but you have shown me the error of my ways so I will give it.
__________________
If we weren't meant to eat animals, then why are they made of meat?
Buck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2007, 05:16 PM   #16
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 605
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
Vera, please don't tell me you're one of those people who, when you ask, "How are you?", you reply, "I'm well, thanks."

Yes, it's more correct grammatically (most of us aren't that "good" all the time, except for Eric Clapton and Mother Teresa and so forth), but criminee, we're talkin' conversational English here!

I wrangle with written English every day, in which precision and clarity are rather important (just ask our clients who are complying with some EPA rule), but I am less fastidious when it comes to jabbering with my acquaintances.

When they ask me to give a speech at the UN, I'll be a little more careful in my rhetorical choices.
Just say, "I'm fine," and you're set.
__________________
suzyQ3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2007, 05:18 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzyQ3
Similarly, a super common goof is to insert the word "over" in a sentence such as "I'm coming over to your house." I make this mistake all the time. I should say, "I'm coming to your house." Usually, though, I find myself abbreviating it to, "I'm coming over," so in that case, I have a dilemma.
Suzy, you would be tearing your hair out around the Chicago area. There many people say "I'll be coming by your house after lunch" or "I went by my mother-in-law's on the way home."

People there will also ask if you want to "come with" when you go by your destination.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2007, 05:26 PM   #18
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 605
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
Suzy, you would be tearing your hair out around the Chicago area. There many people say "I'll be coming by your house after lunch" or "I went by my mother-in-law's on the way home."

People there will also ask if you want to "come with" when you go by your destination.
Hahaha....I guess I'd rather have someone "by" my house than "over" my house. But to tell you the truth, this particular error is beneath my radar, certainly not on my list of "nails on a chalkboard" mistakes.

Funny how different people are bugged by different language issues. My husband has a fit anytime someone qualifies the word "unique"; e.g., "The music is very unique." Although I know that the word is an absolute adjective and shouldn't be used in the comparative or superlative, I'm unfazed by it. But I love to catch him wince.
__________________
suzyQ3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2007, 05:31 PM   #19
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
In technical report writing, it is important to be concise, accurate, and have an uncanny ability to transform jargon into commonly understood language. I thought i was good at the art, though I tend to be wordy in common conversational writing (No! Say it ain't so! )

This thread has shown me how most of us, without knowing it, lengthen our sentences needlessly by adding tags at the end, and sometimes in the midst of our sentences. Some notorious examples are the British and Canadian habits of turning statements into questions by tacking "eh", or "what" on the sentence ends. Prepositions are badly abused by many. Sometimes I will hear, or read three or more prepositions in one sentence. I also know people who will try to clarify their meanings by stating a comment five different ways before they get their idea finished. And we won't even go into colloquializms and the butchering of the language by heavy regional accents.

After all is said, it is a wonder we can communicate successfully.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2007, 05:38 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzyQ3
My husband has a fit anytime someone qualifies the word "unique"; e.g., "The music is very unique." Although I know that the word is an absolute adjective and shouldn't be used in the comparative or superlative, I'm unfazed by it. But I love to catch him wince.
I'm like your husband. That one makes me want to go out and commit some grammar somewhere.

I didn't say I was consistent.
__________________

__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.