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Old 07-07-2015, 09:07 PM   #4481
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
We always reclaim a bunch of our missing tupperware each time we visit our daughter.
We gladly give stuff to our Indian neighbors. Their custom is to never return a container empty! We get some tasty stuff.
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Old 07-07-2015, 10:33 PM   #4482
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We gladly give stuff to our Indian neighbors. Their custom is to never return a container empty! We get some tasty stuff.

I like this custom!
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Old 07-07-2015, 11:01 PM   #4483
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We aren't Indian, but my Mom taught me you never return someone's container empty. Sometimes, though, I've had to go retrieve a dish before the receiver even considers returning it empty. Now, unless it's my dear SIL, any food I move along to someone else is sent in an old cottage cheese container, or a plastic carry-out from take-away Chinese food. If you aren't related to me, I don't trust you with my good stuff.
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Old 07-08-2015, 06:38 AM   #4484
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My rant might seem trivial to many, but to me is important. At one time, vulgar language was owned by persons who generally worked in hard-labor invironments, such as the military, contruction, and mostly by males. This has changed over the years. Our language speaks to the world what kind of people we are.

One phrase in particular has bothered me for many years. That phrase is - "This sucks!"

I was in the military as a young man when I first heard it. But it wasn't in the truncated form that is spoken by the majority of our common society today. I knew the whole phrase, and at that time, when I hadn't yet chosen to be the man I am now, I swore and used vulgarities like a sailor. Then again, I was a sailor.

There are so many better ways to say that we don't like a situation than to use that phrase. In my opinion, when I have found myself using it, I have felt like I just dropped an f-bomb. I chose to improve my language, and quit using such phrases, and quit swearing almost forty years ago. It's a personal bar I set for myself. I just wish everyone would set a similar bar for themselves, not to be better than anyone else, just to be better.

There, I said it. I hope no one thinks I'm being preachy. That's not my intent. I just needed to take a stand against one of the many things that debase us.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

I hear you loud and clear.. Unfortunately, in my opinion, the whole society has become more vulgar. Tattoos used to be for sailors and criminals. The way people dress, especially women, only street walkers used to dress like that. Modesty in dress code is nearly nonexistent. Into your face mentality seems what rules this world. I remember my grandfather, he never used bad language, never. I have a filthy mouth, mostly because I'm compensating for my poor English. Sad.


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Old 07-08-2015, 06:46 AM   #4485
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I hear ya, RF. My Anchor Hocking glass food containers are the ones I definitely want back.
I have a set of glass fridge containers from the early 40's. They never leave my home. Heaven knows, my kids have tried though.
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Old 07-08-2015, 07:07 AM   #4486
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I watch the TV and the women have their skirts right up to the bottom of their rump. When they go to sit down, they have to assume an uncomfortable position in order to keep their legs closed. I love watching them squirm.

But what really turns my stomach is seeing women who have tattoos up their neck and onto their face. Why would anyone want to mark up their face for the rest of their life? Is it that I am just not with it?
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Old 07-08-2015, 09:36 AM   #4487
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4th & 5th of July

For three months I've been browsing my favorite butcher shop, selecting the best steaks I could find. If there were none in the meat case that met my standards, I wouldn't by what was there. So, I finally found enough really nice rib-eyes, porterhouse, and flat iron steaks to feed the family, that would be Sprout, her husband, and two kids, my son the professional cook, DW, and me.

So next on the list was to buy lump charcoal for the Weber. Bought some. Ok, got fresh corn, made up some really good baked beans, from dried beans, with pork in it of course. The carrot salad was made, two large racks of ribs, untrimmed were purchased, milk in the fridge, watermelon, I'm ready. The kids got here about 3p.m. on Saturday.

I fired up the grill and prepared the steaks. When the charcoal was hot, I put the lid on to cool everything down to a good cooking temperature. I took the steaks out and lifted the lid. The fire seemed to have cooled too much. I put the steaks on and there was no instant sizzle going on. I left the lid off to check something in the house. I was only away from the grill for 3; to 4 minutes at most. I walked back outside to check everything, and the charcoal had gone from too cool to inferno. The bottom of the steaks were completely blackend. The smell of burnt meat filled the air. I flipped them and let the other side cook for 1 minute. I removed the meat to a platter and hoped I could cut the burnt layer off.

I cut the burnt layer off and served up edible, but well done steak to everyone. I went from pit-master, to the pits in about 6 minutes. Heavy, heavy sigh.

Ok, now, on the 5th Removed the thawed ribs from the fridge. rubbed on rack with my brown sugar and chili powder dry rub (yes there are other ingredients, but I can't give all of my secrets away). I had pre-heated the oven to 350'F, and then turned it down to 200'F. I wrapped the rib rack into an sealed, aluminum pouch and place into roasting pan, then into the oven.

Mae a savory rub of salt, pepper, oregano, basil, cumin, and a few secret ingredients, then rubbed the mixure all over the 2nd rib rack. Oh, and of course, I removed the silver skin from both racks. I massaged the dry rub into the ribs rack. The same charcoal was used from the day before, but just a few chunks, enough to produce the level of heat I wanted, and only on one side. The smoking box was filled with hardwood chips and placed on the side of the charcoal pile, to create that required smoke. I put the ribs on the other side, sitting in a kind of aluminum foil bowl, on a rack so that the smoke could engulf every nook and cranny of those ribs. I covered the grill and closed all vent to the half-open position. I made a North Carolina style mop of vinager, honey, water, with a hint of ginger. Every twenty minutes, I mopped the ribs and maintained the fire.

At the four hour mark, I reduced the oven temp to 170'F. The ribs on the barbecue were looking great.

At 5 hours, the meat was removed from the grill and the oven. The corn was then thrown onto the barbecue, and the left-over baked beans were re-heated.

According to Sprout, those were the best ribs she had ever eaten, and it didn't matter which rack she picked from. She eats meat sparingly, but ate so many ribs that she was afraid of having a meat hangover the next day.

The meat was very juicy and tender, though not fall-off-the-bone tender. And ther rubs created a flavor that didn't overpower the natural good flavor of the pork, but enhanced it. The smoke ring in the meat was delicate so that the smoke didn't overpower the meat either. The flavors were so wonderfully balanced.

From in the pits to pit-master in 5 hours.

Lesson learned, know the cooking properties of your fuel before you put expensive steaks over the fuel.

Over all, in spite of the burnt steaks, there was good food and great times had by all. I got to play with the granddaughters, serve then home-made French vanilla ice cream, swirled with home made chocolate/Nutella fudge, and give them those sweet, not very good for you cereal in the little boxes, where they could each pick the one they wanted to eat, and of course, Grandpa's blueberry pancakes, with bacon on the side. I got to goof off with my daughter and SIL. We completed the task of removing the left-over pieces of demolished garage, and now I can order the supplies to build the new one.

Saturday through Tuesday evening was a glorious time, even with burnt steaks.

Oh, and the petty vent, I ruined expensive steaks because I was arrogant enough to think I knew how to cook anything, on anything.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 07-08-2015, 12:26 PM   #4488
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
We gladly give stuff to our Indian neighbors. Their custom is to never return a container empty! We get some tasty stuff.
Now that's sound good!
I wish I had neighbors like that, but this being L.A. neighbors rarely associate with one another, and we've been living in this house for 25 years. We hardly know our neighbors beyond our immediate next door folks.
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Old 07-08-2015, 01:08 PM   #4489
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
.......Lesson learned, know the cooking properties of your fuel before you put expensive steaks over the fuel.
........
Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
And never walk away from the grill, even for a minute. Those fat flare-ups happen so quickly. Glad to hear your ribs were such a success Chief, they sound really good.
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Old 07-08-2015, 01:24 PM   #4490
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About loosing containers, I love to give away food to favorite widowed neighbors. They all live just steps away. If I've made a big pot of soup, I've taken to calling them and telling them to come over with a container, as the soup kitchen is open.

I also was taught to never return an empty container, even if it's just filled with store bought candy.
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