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Old 12-17-2013, 04:29 PM   #11
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"I don't like that." Is my grandson's first reaction when asked about a new food. I worked with him a lot to get him to say, "I don't know, I've never had it." But have had limited success.
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Old 12-17-2013, 04:39 PM   #12
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Interesting subject.

A lot has to do with how one was raised. When I was a child, and when I raised my own children, you were only allowed to say you didn't like something after you tasted it first.
I'm astounded how many people say they don't like something when it turns out they've never tasted it. I call those folks food snobs.
My parents did the same thing. They called it the "no thank you bite" and you had to have one before you could say no thank you. I grew up an omnivore. I'll try just about anything at least once. There are some things I draw the line at (brains and intestines stand out in my mind) but as a general rule there are very few things I don't at least tolerate. My only reason for not eating most foods now is because they don't agree with me, not because I don't like them (though Brussels sprouts are my Kryptonite).
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Old 12-17-2013, 05:22 PM   #13
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Fascinating thread.

I grew up in a household where you ate what was on your plate. Period. That's just the way it was. As a result, perhaps, I'll eat nearly anything. However, I have to explain that my biological mother who didn't cook much after she realized she could push that task on to me had some unusual food opinions.

I wasn't born in the south, but most of my formative years were spent there as were those of my 4 younger siblings. My mother was a dipped and dyed Yankee. Therefore, some of her assumptions were...

Cornbread and fried mush were peasant food. Not fit for people to eat. She had a bit of an elitist attitude, too.

Wax (yellow) beans were not to be eaten. Beans are supposed to be GREEN. Similar belief when it came to corn. Corn HAD to be yellow. No white corn or silver queen varieties.

ALL tomatoes must be red. No exceptions.

There are many more of her food "snobs/snubs" but I can't recall them at the moment. She would be horrified at what I've eaten in my lifetime or what I've cooked.

I'm not saying that Northerners have the same beliefs as my mother but she made sure to let us know, sometimes loudly and definitely clearly, that her way of choosing, preparing and eating food was the right way. I never understood it.

As for other picky eaters or food snobs, they're missing out on some wonderful stuff. More for us.
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Old 12-17-2013, 05:24 PM   #14
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I'm not picky, but when it comes to Gwen's cooking....!! I'm working with her on that.

A food snob lives across the street from us. When I had my new stove delivered, she came out and said it was a waste of money, for DA doesn't cook very much and it was obvious I didn't cook. I told her it was MY stove and that we haven't starved to death yet and asked her how was it obvious I didn't cook? She said young people don't cook and just use the microwaves.

I took her a bowl of my nice chicken soup and she was very happily surprised! Now she's very nice to me, for I bring to her samples of my cooking.

I don't trust raw fish at all. I had some when we visited friends in the Czech Republic, and I threw it all up. Is that picky?

Other than that I'll try anything. Once.

With love,
~Cat
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Old 12-17-2013, 05:28 PM   #15
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I grew up with parents that did not tolerate fussiness about food, you ate what was on your plate.

As an adult I fill my plate with things that look interesting to me and pass on the things that don't. I don't feel the need to announce the reason behind all of my choices and I take offense to people who follow me down the buffet line telling me all of the reasons I should eat the things that I have left behind!

"Chacun à son goût!" said the old lady as she kissed the cow.
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Old 12-17-2013, 05:39 PM   #16
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I don't trust raw fish at all. I had some when we visited friends in the Czech Republic, and I threw it all up. Is that picky?
I wouldn't say that's picky - that kind of memory can be hard to shake - but unless you're allergic, it wouldn't hurt to try it again. I was afraid to try sushi for years, but now I know how it should be treated before being served, so there are a few kinds I eat.

I don't know what the food safety laws are like in the Czech Republic, but there are places around the world where I wouldn't eat certain things, either, and Eastern Europe hasn't been very forward-thinking when it comes to environmental laws.
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Old 12-17-2013, 05:42 PM   #17
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Growing up, mealtime was very stressful. Both my parents had very bad tempers, demanding a clean plate, and as a kid, I was a very picky eater. No food on the plate could touch another food, and if the meat was even perceived to have one iota of fat, it would go into a napkin and surrepticiously get thrown away. I could also throw up on a whim.

Now I put together strange combinations, love most meat, and will eat almost anything with the exceptions of fishy-tasting fish, organ meats and offal, and the Epitome of Evil, Brussels sprouts.
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Old 12-17-2013, 05:56 PM   #18
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GG you are correct. Maybe someday I'll try this again. The food safety laws in Eastern Europe are not as they are here.

Dawgluver, I love you to pieces but if you come at me with anything like Gwen's Brussels sprouts dish, I'll sell you upriver to the DC gypsy Katie.

I'd like to think I'm not a food snob, though. I'm trying to learn good cooking but this doesn't mean my foods are perfect at all. I do have such a long way to go to becoming a good cook.

But I must say, Kadema's pork chops with the onion sauce was perfect and we love it! I would never have thought anything up like that!

With love,
~Cat
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Old 12-17-2013, 06:05 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Interesting subject.

A lot has to do with how one was raised. When I was a child, and when I raised my own children, you were only allowed to say you didn't like something after you tasted it first.
I'm astounded how many people say they don't like something when it turns out they've never tasted it. I call those folks food snobs.
Ouch. I guess that makes me a food snob because I won't eay cooked beets?

My definition of food snob is someone who puts down the food that another person likes, or at lleast eats. And I don't mean, someone who puts down red meat because they are a vegetarian. I mean the people who instantly post in a thread with the usual: That tastes like cardboard; I don't know how anyone can eat that; Homemade is so much better; I won't buy premade/packaged foods; I only use fresh herbs... with the accompanying to illustrate you are making them sick by saying you ate a box of mac and cheese for lunch, or a can of Campbells soup, or used dried basil in a dish. Heck, even those that want to make sure they let everybody know that they haven't eaten at Burger King in thirty years just because they stopped there for lunch the other week. Gotta let the masses know it was highly unusual circumstances that forced you into the predicament of having to eat a Whopper and fries now... So sorry you had to become one of forty billion served
Although I have noticed Costco foods seems immune from this

oops, did I go on a rant?
Anyway, that's my definition of a food snob. Which is not exactly the same as a picky eater. A picky eater refuses to eat certain things. A food snob looks down their nose at others' food and refuses to eat it... for whatever reason. Is that what you meant, OP?
And that has nothing to do with stopping eating something for health reasons.

You can be passionate in your likes without stepping on others' likes.

"Someone's singing, Lord..."
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Old 12-17-2013, 06:23 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Interesting subject.

A lot has to do with how one was raised. When I was a child, and when I raised my own children, you were only allowed to say you didn't like something after you tasted it first.
I'm astounded how many people say they don't like something when it turns out they've never tasted it. I call those folks food snobs.
Many folks grew up with Mom making whatever they wanted even if it was not what she cooked for supper. Mom would make her little darling a separate meal if he/she complained. In my house, the kids had to eat what was served or if they chose not, they could go hungry or make their own PB&J sandwich. They also had to at least take one bite of anything new before they refused much like Kayelle.
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