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Old 12-18-2013, 12:11 AM   #31
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My generation were the children of parents who lived through the Depression. They carried those times into their marriage and the dinner table. Hamburger Helper, boxed mac and cheese and other foods of convenience were not available to our parents. So my generation grew up on food from scratch. Then we got married and had our own families. Money was not always plentiful, and those convenience foods helped feed a lot of families. I know it certainly helped feed my kids. A box cake mix was cheaper than making one from scratch. When money was plentiful, we were able to feed our families like we had been. We made the dishes our mothers made. And we were able to make those cakes and pies that we grew up on. Unfortunately, by the time that day came, my kids were used to the boxed items. But if we stuck to our guns and continued to make scratch foods, they began to develop more sophisticated taste buds.

As I got older, and health problems began to pop up, my intestinal tract decided to develop a mind of its own. That and food allergies were limiting what I could and could not eat. But I don't make a fuss about it to anyone. Today, I find most of the boxed items very salty. Cold cuts leave me cold. Again too salty. Yet they were the building stone for school lunches in my home. So now I keep my mouth shut and a quiet "no thank you" suffices when I am offered a food I can't have. Some times I will take a small spoonful. If pushed, I certainly don't want to discuss my health problems at the dinner table. So I just say I suffer from 'fatonmythigh' as one word and very quickly. I have found that if I say I am allergic, a whole conversation starts about food allergies. Not at the dinner table please.

If your income or taste buds lead you to convenience foods, then I say go for them. If you come across a food snob, change the conversation quickly. Nothing you say is going to make a difference to them. You owe no explanation to anyone for how you shop for groceries. You purchase what you can afford and like. There is no such thing as "real food" and "fake food." Just good or bad food.
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Old 12-18-2013, 12:54 PM   #32
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As stated above, there is a difference between picky eaters and food snobs. Picky eaters are those who refuse to eat certain foods, usually because there's something about the given food they find unappealing. For the most part, I don't think there's anything wrong with being a picky eater. People don't eat what they don't like and there's not much you can do to change it.

My own mother didn't push me to try new foods, but my grandmother did. If my brother or I scoffed or picked at something on the plate, she would glare and say in a stern voice, "Quit acting like a baby and just eat it!" That was usually all it took.

Some picky eaters are just completely over the top. My father-in-law is a good example. For meats, he only eats beef, chicken, and ham. The only two vegetables he will eat are canned green beans and corn, and sometimes mashed potatoes (but only if they are of a consistency that meets with his approval). Ethnic foods are completely out, with the exception of pizza and tacos. Unfortunately, due to his pickiness, the man has boxed himself into a little world. While I like him on a personal level, he is very unpleasant to have dinner with.

Food snobs are a different animal altogether. These types invariably want you to know that their food choices are vastly superior to yours. On occasion I've been accused of being a food snob because I'm very selective in what I buy and cook for my family. The truth is, the accusers are probably right. I think I am kind of a snob. But I've gotten to the point where I try not to push my own choices on other people anymore, as I believe that crosses a line. As with picky eaters, I personally don't feel there's anything inherently wrong with being a selective consumer (vs. "food snob"), as long as you're not obnoxious about it. And if I go to someone else's house for dinner, I always try to respect the cook and the work that was put into the meal and generally eat what's served without complaint.
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Old 12-18-2013, 01:03 PM   #33
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Well said Steve.
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Old 12-18-2013, 02:02 PM   #34
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I was raised in the Midwest. My mother was a very good cook but she always did the meat and potato stuff with overcooked fresh veggies, though. Pepper was the only spice besides salt and cinnamon for cookies.

Then I moved to California in my very early 20s.Whoa! Vistas of great food opened up to me and I never looked back.

I discovered that I could eat and love everything and I wanted my daughter, born a few years later, to not be picky. My ploy was to not offer her anything 'different' like beets or liver although my husband and I had them on our plates.

She wailed "I want some of that". I told her it was grown up food and when she got older she could have it.
More wailing and pleading. I gave in and said, o.k, but just one bite!

It worked on almost everything. I no longer had to avoid 'different' foods.

Yeah, o.k.----- report me to the Mean Mommies Police!
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Old 12-18-2013, 04:31 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by cave76 View Post
I was raised in the Midwest. My mother was a very good cook but she always did the meat and potato stuff with overcooked fresh veggies, though. Pepper was the only spice besides salt and cinnamon for cookies.

Then I moved to California in my very early 20s.Whoa! Vistas of great food opened up to me and I never looked back.

I discovered that I could eat and love everything and I wanted my daughter, born a few years later, to not be picky. My ploy was to not offer her anything 'different' like beets or liver although my husband and I had them on our plates.

She wailed "I want some of that". I told her it was grown up food and when she got older she could have it.
More wailing and pleading. I gave in and said, o.k, but just one bite!

It worked on almost everything. I no longer had to avoid 'different' foods.

Yeah, o.k.----- report me to the Mean Mommies Police!
Pretty darn smart, if you ask me.

Reverse psychology often works with little ones. I was a day care mother in my younger years, and when they would get too loud I'd start whispering. They'd always quiet down to try and hear what I was saying.
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Old 12-18-2013, 04:55 PM   #36
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I used to like to have the kids in the living room with me at night. That way I could keep an eye on all of them at the same time. So I used to go around and shut off all the lights in the other rooms. Kids do not like being in the dark alone.
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Old 12-18-2013, 05:55 PM   #37
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there is a difference between picky eaters and food snobs. Picky eaters are those who refuse to eat certain foods, they don't like and there's not much you can do to change it.

Food snobs are a different animal altogether. These types invariably want you to know that their food choices are vastly superior to yours.

I try not to push my own choices on other people anymore, as I believe that crosses a line.

And if I go to someone else's house for dinner, I always try to respect the cook and the work that was put into the meal and generally eat what's served without complaint.
Hear hear..... well said! (Steve, hope you don't mind my editing!)
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Old 12-18-2013, 07:35 PM   #38
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My friends know that I cook mostly from scratch and at times I get the impression that they think that I'm a food snob, because we'll be discussing food and they'll say "sorry, I used a cake mix"

I like my recipes better than most mixes and convenience foods, but I totally understand that others haven't made dozens of cakes to perfect the recipe, or they might not have everything to make a recipe from scratch, heck they may not even want to.

Just because I don't care for something doesn't make them bad, just that my choices are different.
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Old 12-18-2013, 07:40 PM   #39
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There is also a socioeconomic component to brand loyalty. Often those of lesser means will be attracted to brand names because they think it makes them look less poor to others, and makes them feel better that they can have the "better" product. This is a real thing.
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Old 12-18-2013, 09:18 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
...Food snobs are a different animal altogether. These types invariably want you to know that their food choices are vastly superior to yours. On occasion I've been accused of being a food snob because I'm very selective in what I buy and cook for my family. The truth is, the accusers are probably right. I think I am kind of a snob. But I've gotten to the point where I try not to push my own choices on other people anymore, as I believe that crosses a line. As with picky eaters, I personally don't feel there's anything inherently wrong with being a selective consumer (vs. "food snob"), as long as you're not obnoxious about it. And if I go to someone else's house for dinner, I always try to respect the cook and the work that was put into the meal and generally eat what's served without complaint.
Well put, I agree. I have been waiting to reply to this topic, because I wanted to write a meaningful reply. I'm a bit of a food snob. I often honestly find the "food snob" choice to taste better and seem healthier to me. But, I have no objection to buying/eating the "low brow" version if it tastes good and isn't full of weird chemicals.

I had to start reading labels back in the '70s, when I noticed that I have an unpleasant reaction to MSG. It meant that I couldn't buy most canned soups and lots of other pre-made foods, so I learned to cook them myself. I have no objection to pre-made foods, if they are made of healthy ingredients and taste good, e.g., Habitant Pea Soup. One of two canned soups I could find back then, that didn't have MSG. The other one was Howard Johnson's clam chowder.

There's another reason some people might be picky eaters. People have varying levels of tasting ability. BBC - Science & Nature - Human Body and Mind - Test your tastebuds

I'm a super taster, so I really dislike most bitter. I love chocolate, but not dark chocolate. It's too bitter. I've been told again and again that it's an acquired taste. I haven't acquired it and doubt that I ever will. I can taste the sodium bisulfate (or maybe it's the sodium benzoate) in ReaLemon. It's bitter and makes it unpleasant. So, am I being a food snob when I say I prefer stuff made with actual lemon juice or organic bottled lemon juice? I try not to be obnoxious about it, but if you ask me what I think of that homemade hummus with the ReaLemon, I'll tell you.
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