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Old 12-30-2013, 08:14 AM   #31
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When we moved to the Twin Cities in Minn. from Hamilton,On back in the 50's people had a hard time believing we were actually now living farther north.

We got the same amount of snow, but it was colder. My brother would step outside with wet hair and have it freeze in place... He hated hair goop.
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Old 12-30-2013, 08:37 AM   #32
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Another tip/reminder for people who live in areas that have fluctuating temps.... gas line anti freeze!

We are coming into a cold snap this week and for once I actually remembered to fill up and dump in a bottle before it happens. Nothing more aggravting having to wait 20/30 min. before the car will start while the anti freeze works it way thru.
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Old 12-30-2013, 08:51 AM   #33
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We used to run a mechanics lead light or trouble light out to the car and leave it in the engine compartment with a 100 watt light bulb burning overnight. The light gave off just enough heat to keep the frost out of the engine and kept the oil from turning to molasses. I also carried a bucket of sand or kitty litter, a short handled shovel, a candle, a large sheet of cardboard, a couple candy bars and a fifty dollar bill.

The only things that never made it to spring were the candy bars and the fifty dollar bill!

Today I have nothing but a credit card and the OnStar lady!
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Old 12-30-2013, 09:03 AM   #34
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It may take three days for the person, the OnStar Lady sent, to get to you. I would continue to keep emergency supplies in my car. Winter driving should not be a picnic, but it can turn into one quickly.
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Old 12-30-2013, 09:08 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
It may take three days for the person, the OnStar Lady sent, to get to you. I would continue to keep emergency supplies in my car. Winter driving should not be a picnic, but it can turn into one quickly.
At this point in my life I don't go anywhere that a pizza delivery boy wouldn't go, sort of like a modern day Saint Bernard!

Delivery in 30 minutes or its free, who needs a tow truck!

I do think people should carry two or three days worth of pills and medical supplies with them during the winter, ya never know.
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Old 12-30-2013, 09:11 AM   #36
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At this point in my life I don't go anywhere that a pizza delivery boy wouldn't go, sort of like a modern day Saint Bernard!

Delivery in 30 minutes or its free, who needs a tow truck!

I do think people should carry two or three days worth of pills and medical supplies with them during the winter, ya never know.
So, no jaunts to the outer reaches of the county for a lark? Good idea. We watched the road conditions carefully when I had to go to Helena last month. My co-worker was impressed that I had a survival pack for her, too.
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Old 12-30-2013, 09:16 AM   #37
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So, no jaunts to the outer reaches of the county for a lark? Good idea. We watched the road conditions carefully when I had to go to Helena last month. My co-worker was impressed that I had a survival pack for her, too.
My larks flew the coop years ago!
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:25 AM   #38
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Look at how many folks leave the comfort of their homes and head for the mountains and more snow and cold so they can go skiing.

NOT ME !!!

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Old 12-30-2013, 02:13 PM   #39
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I knew practically nothing about really cold weather before an amazing trip to Yellowstone in Feb. of 2011. This was part of that trip story...

"We now understand what it is to be truly cold at -24F; however it was such a privilege to see this "national treasure" as few tourists experience, in the dead of winter with bright beautiful sunshine every day. The raw and frigid beauty of the animals and scenery will be remembered forever.
Believe me; we have a whole new respect for all of you who live your daily lives in
frigid temperatures. Just getting dressed for the day takes so much time!
The night we got home we were watching the news, and the weather forecast for the next day was 80 degrees.

I turned to Steve and said "That's 100 degrees warmer than yesterday!
In the morning we quickly dressed in our usual cotton shirts and shorts, glad to be home"

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Old 12-30-2013, 02:50 PM   #40
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You kind of get used to it. I don't usually even have to look at the thermometer to know how cold it is. My dogs have no problem letting me know. When I let them out in the morning to do their business and it's below zero, they will be back barking to come in within two minutes.
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