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Old 04-19-2013, 08:41 PM   #691
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They look lovely Taxy
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Old 04-20-2013, 07:52 AM   #692
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Thanks, Taxy. What a nice reminder of the only thing I miss about living up north. I loved watching the bulbs blossom, and especially loved the daffodils.
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Old 04-20-2013, 08:34 AM   #693
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And while I was at it, I took some pix of the chives and parsley, both coming back without help from me.
I love it when that happens. I bought some potted chives several years ago. I've done nothing to help them along. but somehow they've made it through every winter so far.
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Old 04-20-2013, 08:53 AM   #694
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I love it when that happens. I bought some potted chives several years ago. I've done nothing to help them along. but somehow they've made it through every winter so far.
Chives seem to like our colder climate. The only time they seemed threatened was when I planted wild morning glory. I like the flowers, I had no idea it would try to strangle every other nearby plant. At least it wasn't hard to get rid of the morning glory, which never flowered.

I love the purple chive flowers and love surprising people by putting them in salads.
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Old 04-20-2013, 10:33 AM   #695
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The lamium are going crazy. I bought one years ago and it nearly didn't survive. Then I got a few from my M-I-L and it seemed to revive the ones I already had. They have pink flowers and pale leaves, the new ones have dark green & white leaves with purple flowers. When I bought the first one, it was called a "purple dragon". It had purple flowers back then. I think they are in the mint family. They have the right shape of leaves and square stems.
I have L. Beacon Silver and White Nancy. I like that it does so well in the shade gardens for me, and spreads, but is not invasive. Great plant.
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Old 04-20-2013, 12:30 PM   #696
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In Tacoma, WA, they have a Daffodil Festival every spring. Every kind of daffodil can been found in WA. There are even fields of them on the prarie lands that grow wild and come back every year. All it takes is one bulb or risone and in a year or two you have quite a garden. They do multiply very fast and where ever they want to. My favorite is the King Alfred. It has the largest trumpet of all the daffodils.
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Old 04-20-2013, 12:36 PM   #697
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In Tacoma, WA, they have a Daffodil Festival every spring. Every kind of daffodil can been found in WA. There are even fields of them on the prarie lands that grow wild and come back every year. All it takes is one bulb or risone and in a year or two you have quite a garden. They do multiply very fast and where ever they want to. My favorite is the King Alfred. It has the largest trumpet of all the daffodils.
My little daffies aren't multiplying

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Old 04-20-2013, 01:41 PM   #698
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My little daffies aren't multiplying

We do have a newly graduated Master Gardener here. But my first guess would be to feed them some lime and loosen the dirt around the bulbs or risone. The soil may have become compacted and it also needs to be sweetened. Also make sure you don't have any underground critters that just love to chew on bulbs for a snack.
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Old 04-20-2013, 01:59 PM   #699
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We do have a newly graduated Master Gardener here. But my first guess would be to feed them some lime and loosen the dirt around the bulbs or risone. The soil may have become compacted and it also needs to be sweetened. Also make sure you don't have any underground critters that just love to chew on bulbs for a snack.
Actually, dafs are pretty critter-proof, unlike tulips and other bulbs. I would pop the spent blooms off before they set seed, and resist the urge to cut down the foliage until it's yellow and dry or slimy. I used to braid the foliage after blooming as it looks pretty untidy, but that's a no-no. Now I just let it do its thing. Hybrids are less likely to spread than non-hybrids. I don't fertilize or do anything else with the soil.
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Old 04-20-2013, 02:19 PM   #700
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Actually, dafs are pretty critter-proof, unlike tulips and other bulbs. I would pop the spent blooms off before they set seed, and resist the urge to cut down the foliage until it's yellow and dry or slimy. I used to braid the foliage after blooming as it looks pretty untidy, but that's a no-no. Now I just let it do its thing. Hybrids are less likely to spread than non-hybrids. I don't fertilize or do anything else with the soil.
Thanks Dawg. I had forgotten about hybrids and cutting back of the leaves after the blooms are done. You should always let the energy of the leaves go back into the bulb. Once they turn brown, then you can cut them back. I used to loosen the soil in the spring. I also used to fold the leaves over and tie together with another leaf while still attached. Looked much neater while they were going brown.
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