"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > The Back Porch > Off Topic Discussions
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-06-2005, 10:42 AM   #21
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
...I get the impression that when they load the recipe with seasoning and condiments, it is to disguise the not-so-good/fresh ingredients...
I don't think that's a fair conclusion. Some cuisines are focused on complex blends of herbs and spices to to produce flavor profiles not available otherwise.

If you enjoy Indian or Cajun/Creole cuisine, you enjoy that blending of 6, 8, 10, 12 or more herbs and spices.

It's not the only way or the best way to cook, it's just a different way.

Italian foods are among my favorites to eat and cook. When I prepare an Italian dish, my approach is different from when I prepare a Cajun dish (another of my favorites). I enjoy both cuisines. The differences make life interesting.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2005, 10:50 AM   #22
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Well said Andy!!!
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2005, 10:51 AM   #23
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I don't think that's a fair conclusion. Some cuisines are focused on complex blends of herbs and spices to to produce flavor profiles not available otherwise.

If you enjoy Indian or Cajun/Creole cuisine, you enjoy that blending of 6, 8, 10, 12 or more herbs and spices.

It's not the only way or the best way to cook, it's just a different way.

Italian foods are among my favorites to eat and cook. When I prepare an Italian dish, my approach is different from when I prepare a Cajun dish (another of my favorites). I enjoy both cuisines. The differences make life interesting.
I concur with both opinions. Re fresh - If I could, I would use fresh herbs rather than bottled. Even the aroma is better. Since I don't have a garden, maybe I should bring my Chia herb garden out of the pantry and give it a try

Another example of recipe overkill (for me) - A tuna sammich. I like tuna, and am so tuna-ed off when I order it in some restaurants and there's so much mayo (and sometimes pickle relish), it's served in a scoop or more like a spread. Where's the tuna?

There's a chain here called Subway - subs with any added extras you like. But, there is so much mayo in the seafood, it's a crime.
__________________
mish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2005, 06:00 PM   #24
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I don't think that's a fair conclusion. Some cuisines are focused on complex blends of herbs and spices to to produce flavor profiles not available otherwise.

If you enjoy Indian or Cajun/Creole cuisine, you enjoy that blending of 6, 8, 10, 12 or more herbs and spices.

It's not the only way or the best way to cook, it's just a different way.

Italian foods are among my favorites to eat and cook. When I prepare an Italian dish, my approach is different from when I prepare a Cajun dish (another of my favorites). I enjoy both cuisines. The differences make life interesting.
Yes Andy, I do agree with the Indian cuisine, their way of blending the herbs and spices are really state of art. You have a point in that, it is just that I have come across so many examples of what I have said (disguising the poor ingredients with seasoning etc.), but I shouldn't have made it sound too absolute.
__________________
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2005, 07:05 AM   #25
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I love Indian and Thai food, and both require so many spices that I cannot truly do them justice in my kitchen without buying a spice blend. One time I actually bought all the basic spices for a several-course Indian dinner, toasted them myself, etc. I know this will sound silly to a lot of you, but my nose and tongue (you know smell and taste are connected) that by the time I finished, everything tasted the same. My freinds (who'd never had Indian food before) were pleased, loved every bite. But, to be honest with you, I buy Pataks, Thai Kitchen, and other blends rather than the 50 or so spice jars that you'd need to do these two cuisines authentically (and, I might add, if you don't eat them every week, they might not be good when you want them). I wish I lived in a place where the "real deal" was readily availble (I might never try to cook them!), but when I get a real hankering, I head for Madison.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2005, 07:38 AM   #26
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 3,834
We like the Subway tuna sandwiches with everything except dressing, oil or vinegar. It almost becomes a veggie sandwich with the tuna salad as a dressing. I would like to make up a few mixtures of herbs and spices of my own, i.e. if I'm making a meatloaf, a mixture of herbs to enhance that dish, or if I'm making a chicken dish, perhaps something akin to poultry seasoning with added herbs. It would be so handy to have my own mixtures already prepared with only the measuring from one container. Also, I could eliminate some of the extra spice containers that take up so much room. Has anyone ever done this? Is this post clear as mud???????????
__________________
Be an organ donor; give your heart to Jesus.
Exercise daily; walk with the Lord.
licia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2005, 09:46 AM   #27
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by licia
...I would like to make up a few mixtures of herbs and spices of my own, i.e. if I'm making a meatloaf, a mixture of herbs to enhance that dish, or if I'm making a chicken dish, perhaps something akin to poultry seasoning with added herbs...

That's good idea. You could have different mixes for different foods. Then you could market them like Emeril and Paul Prudhomme. Then you could be rich and live in the lap of luxury...

Or you could just use them yourself.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2005, 11:05 AM   #28
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 3,834
Thanks - maybe I will just use them myself - or perhaps share with friends if I get it right.
__________________
Be an organ donor; give your heart to Jesus.
Exercise daily; walk with the Lord.
licia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2005, 11:22 AM   #29
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
I love Indian and Thai food, and both require so many spices that I cannot truly do them justice in my kitchen without buying a spice blend. One time I actually bought all the basic spices for a several-course Indian dinner, toasted them myself, etc. I know this will sound silly to a lot of you, but my nose and tongue (you know smell and taste are connected) that by the time I finished, everything tasted the same. My freinds (who'd never had Indian food before) were pleased, loved every bite. But, to be honest with you, I buy Pataks, Thai Kitchen, and other blends rather than the 50 or so spice jars that you'd need to do these two cuisines authentically (and, I might add, if you don't eat them every week, they might not be good when you want them). I wish I lived in a place where the "real deal" was readily availble (I might never try to cook them!), but when I get a real hankering, I head for Madison.
Thai-lover here too, Claire. Made a Thai dish with Thai Kitchen spices once (have the booklet w recipes from years ago). It was okay, but not as good as what I've had in a Thai restaurant. I love cooking with the coconut milk (lite version).

Last count, I have a double-tiered carousel that holds about 20 spices & umpteen in the pantry (some leftover from filling the spice jars, & some new). Once a year (usually in January) - along with replacing the batteries on the smoke detectors, I dump them out and buy new/fresh spices. Since I don't use most of them, thinking of going thru them, tossing most of what I don't use, & scaling down.

I have a friend that has a custom-made spice rack on her kitchen wall that holds maybe 40 spices. It looks very impressive. P.S. She eats out all the time.
__________________

__________________
mish is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.