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Old 09-17-2018, 06:54 AM   #1
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Regional slang... inspired by Scott-180...

I had a playful language discourse with Scott-180 on another thread, and it got me to thinking about the fun ways we say things around the country, and around the world.

So, let's list some things people say that are regional. I'll start.

Y'all. This is what got me started on this thought train, when Scott-180 mentioned it. It is pretty obvious that it is you + all, as in a group of people. My grandparents from Pittsburgh said "younz," and back when I was kid in the Northeast, it was "you guys."

Fixin. Big time Texas thing. It means "getting ready to..." "I'm fixin' to make a pot of chili."

That dog won't hunt. Basically means, that's Bulls--t.

All hat, no cattle. That is someone who talks big, but can't back it up with results.

Tump. To tip something over or dump something out. "Bubba done tumped that pot of soup on the floor."

One of my favorites, It’s better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick. Hard to explain. It is like saying something isn't too bad, but not good either. In cooking terms, if you overcook a ribeye steak, you might say, "It’s better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick."

Okay, let's get this train rolling!

CD

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Old 09-17-2018, 07:08 AM   #2
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BTW Scott, and you other Brits. I used to be a senior manager of a software company owned by a corporation from Newcastle. The board came to Dallas for meetings, and one of the board members used the term, "Keep your peckers up." The room froze. Perhaps one of you Brits can explain that.

The board member explained it to us, and we all had a good laugh. Words have different meanings in different places.

CD
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Old 09-17-2018, 07:32 AM   #3
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My first wife was a country girl.. Her family came to California during the Oklahoma dust bowl.. ( Think Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck )


One of her slang sayings, which always cracked me up..
When people were talking about something and someone told her, "You can't do that", she would reply, "You just squat and watch"..


I loved that and so many other things she came up with..


Ross
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Old 09-17-2018, 08:09 AM   #4
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Era - late 60's
My late BIL (from OK) drew a room full of shocked silence when he looked at one of the babies at a family gathering (in Toronto) and said:- "Well, ain't you just the cutest little bugger."

Here the reference would be to say the person practiced buggery and was a horrid insult.

I'm not sure it hasn't lost some of its stigma but...
It is also used as an expletive single word that used to carry the same implication that the British expletive "bloody" used to carry.

With global media, world travel and people relocating miles from their birth places it is hard to distinguish what is 'colloquial' anymore.
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Old 09-17-2018, 08:47 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
BTW Scott, and you other Brits. I used to be a senior manager of a software company owned by a corporation from Newcastle. The board came to Dallas for meetings, and one of the board members used the term, "Keep your peckers up." The room froze. Perhaps one of you Brits can explain that.

The board member explained it to us, and we all had a good laugh. Words have different meanings in different places.

CD
Not vulgar as far as I know. It's similar to "Chin up!"or "Be Brave" or just "Cheer up"

Where my uncle by marriage came from (South Derbyshire - Ilkeston area) a general term of greeting is or was until relatively recently "Eh up, mi duck" Mostly used by a man greeting a man or woman of his acquaintance, usually met in the street or on the bus, etc. ("Mi duck" being translatable as "My Dear" & used when addressing males, females and children, either family or well known to the speaker, such as a neighbour or workmate)
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Old 09-17-2018, 08:52 AM   #6
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Growing up in NJ we would say we were going “Up the country” which meant upstate NY rural areas. Or “Down the shore” to the beach areas. Not very good grammar but oh well. LOL
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Old 09-17-2018, 08:56 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
Era - late 60's
My late BIL (from OK) drew a room full of shocked silence when he looked at one of the babies at a family gathering (in Toronto) and said:- "Well, ain't you just the cutest little bugger."

Here the reference would be to say the person practiced buggery and was a horrid insult.

I'm not sure it hasn't lost some of its stigma but...
It is also used as an expletive single word that used to carry the same implication that the British expletive "bloody" used to carry.

With global media, world travel and people relocating miles from their birth places it is hard to distinguish what is 'colloquial' anymore.
my extremely religious great aunt used that term all the time in reference to something adorable, to the absolute horror of my Canada-born mother!
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Old 09-17-2018, 09:01 AM   #8
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an aussie friend floored us when he first used the expression...

"Let's go knock up Susie."
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Old 09-17-2018, 09:04 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
I had a playful language discourse with Scott-180 on another thread, and it got me to thinking about the fun ways we say things around the country, and around the world.

So, let's list some things people say that are regional. I'll start.

Y'all. This is what got me started on this thought train, when Scott-180 mentioned it. It is pretty obvious that it is you + all, as in a group of people. My grandparents from Pittsburgh said "younz," and back when I was kid in the Northeast, it was "you guys."

Fixin. Big time Texas thing. It means "getting ready to..." "I'm fixin' to make a pot of chili."

That dog won't hunt. Basically means, that's Bulls--t.

All hat, no cattle. That is someone who talks big, but can't back it up with results.

Tump. To tip something over or dump something out. "Bubba done tumped that pot of soup on the floor."

One of my favorites, It’s better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick. Hard to explain. It is like saying something isn't too bad, but not good either. In cooking terms, if you overcook a ribeye steak, you might say, "It’s better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick."

Okay, let's get this train rolling!

CD
"That dog won't hunt" I'm trying to remember the British version of that. Perhaps one of my fellow Brits will supply it

"All hat - no cattle" - equivalent in GB = "All mouth and no trousers".

"It's a bit black over Bill's mother's" = "It looks like rain" (another saying from my Ilkeston uncle.

"He wasn't half mad" = "He was extremely angry"
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Old 09-17-2018, 09:12 AM   #10
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Quote:
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an aussie friend floored us when he first used the expression...

"Let's go knock up Susie."
Yes, I can imagine it would

In the northern English cotton towns of the Victorian era (and right into the 1950s in some areas) there was a man employed by the mill-owners to go round to employees houses in the early morning. He carried a long pole with which he would knock on the upstairs windows to wake up the workers, many of whom didn't have alarm clocks at least in the early days. He was called "the Knocker-upper".
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