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Old 05-24-2012, 05:35 AM   #131
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Keep on hoping. When my dog went MIA a number of years ago, I thought for sure she was a goner because she had no, and I do mean NO survival skills. Even though I knew in my heart she was dead on the side of a road somewhere, I still placed a lost noticed in our local weekly. Then, 8 days after her disappearance, a woman called me and said she'd read the notice, and thought her sister & family had found my dog, hiding out under a shed on their farm, several miles (and across a rock quarry) from where we live. We weren't really holding out any hope, but got in the truck and sure as heck, there was this couple, their young son, and a skeleton somewhat resembling my little JR. Husband and I were bawling like babies. The child (I think he was something like maybe 8 or 9) who found her and coaxed her out refused to take renumeration. She had gouges in her back where some predatory bird had attacked her. My vet came in on a Sunday to check her over. We had that beloved doggie for a few more years after that (she was already old when she wandered away), and because I write a column for that paper, she became a celebrety around my small town.

Now I'm absolutely paranoid about keeping my dog in her fenced area or on a leash, in spite of the fact that she's shown no intention whatsoever of leaving us.
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Old 06-07-2012, 08:23 PM   #132
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In September 2002, I received a call from a vet about a 15-month old Saint Bernard with Addison's. The people had scheduled a euthanasia appointment because they could not be bothered with maintaining this condition. A friend and I drove to Toronto (we left at midnight) because the appointment was scheduled for 8:00 a.m. Either we went to get her or else. The first stop on our way home was at the vet clinic. I had a file that was 1 inch thick. One of my dearest friends is a vet and has donated her time to care for rescue dogs that our organization took in. She's done emergency surgery (4.5 months pregnant) at 2:00 a.m. for us. We did blood levels on this girl and the friend who drove to TO with me, fostered her. Once we knew she was stable, I asked a couple who had adopted another dog if they'd give this girl a home. They agreed. This gal was the nanny Saint to both of their sons--waking the mom about 10 minutes before it was time to feed the babies at night. Yesterday, at the age of 11 years, and 5 days, the vet who first treated her (and always treated her), helped her cross over to Rainbow Bridge. She went in the arms of the ones who loved her best. The legacy she has left behind is she taught my friend, the vet, so very much about Addison's and this knowledge is something that my friend will be able to apply to other Addisonian cases for years to come. She also left behind 2 boys who loved her very much, and will always love her. She was one special gal--but her family was also very special. They stepped up to the plate--gave her her meds 2x a day, and loved her best. For a Giant to live more than 10 years, is always a bonus. For a Giant with Addison's to live to be 11, is frigging wild. The fact she did was a testament to the people who cared for her (I knew they were the perfect people for her), and the vet who cared for her. I am sad that she is gone, but so glad she had the best life she could and went with dignity in the arms of those who loved her.
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:38 PM   #133
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My latest with my shelter doggie is that I read a column from a local (I think) trainer in the paper. We'd been having a problem with licking us excessively, and someone had written in about this problem. We hate to yell at her or push her away, but it can be very, very annoying. I use Rx meds in the winter for psoriasis and eczema, and as soon as I apply it, she'll try to lick it off. Can't be good for her, and definitely not good for me. And if you sweat!

Well, this woman said to look at your dog, if you're petting him/her, stop, then fake a big yawn and look away. Huh? Surely it cannot be that simple? I think she said it was the way mother dogs let their puppies know enough is enough (the time I had a mother & puppies, momdog would just leap out of the enclosure when she'd had enough of nursing and wanted to wean, so I never noticed this).

It just sounded way too simple, easy.

We got the paper on Weds, and it's Thurs night. She's two years old (we call her birthday July 4th, but really have no idea, just going by the shelter's estimate), I doubt she was ever weaned (I think abandoned early), but I'll be damned. Not quite two days. She not only stops licking when we do that, but doesn't hardly start (neither of us minds a little friendly lick or two, just that she'll keep it up until it's driving you crazy).

Who'd a thunk?

Anyone else ever heard of this?
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Old 06-08-2012, 10:40 AM   #134
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When Son #1 brings Teddy Bear over he jumps up on my bed and starts licking me. And it is always my arms. I too have psoriasis on my arms and hands. I just thought he was giving me kisses. Sometimes I push him away. I asked my son if he does this at home to him. "No.". He only jumps up on the bed when he wants to go out and knows my son is awake. But he doesn't lick him. I am going to try that yawn and looking away. I will let you know. Interresting.
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Old 06-08-2012, 10:47 AM   #135
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Licking can be a stress reaction/anxiety thing. The yawn, turn away is a calming signal.
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Old 06-09-2012, 01:53 AM   #136
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
When Son #1 brings Teddy Bear over he jumps up on my bed and starts licking me. And it is always my arms. I too have psoriasis on my arms and hands. I just thought he was giving me kisses. Sometimes I push him away. I asked my son if he does this at home to him. "No.". He only jumps up on the bed when he wants to go out and knows my son is awake. But he doesn't lick him. I am going to try that yawn and looking away. I will let you know. Interresting.
Addie, I have Psoriasis and Eczema, but it is seasonal. She licks it and it drives me crazy (not the licking, but the fact that she's removing meds that I really could use, and probably wouldn't be good for her).

Seriously, try the fake yawning thing. I was really surprised. Make a big yawn (not a polite one with your hand in front) and turn away. It was strange how quickly it worked.
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Old 06-09-2012, 02:30 AM   #137
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I really want to know if anyone has success with this, as I've never heard of it before, and it has been immensely succesful with our dog. And I mean quickly. I mean, big, dramatic yawn and turn away. Let me know how it happens for you, because we've had some issues with Rosebud, but didn't think this was much of one, but read about this in a local column, and within 48 hours, her licking was controllable. I emailed the trainer who wrote the column to let her know how well it worked. Fake yawn, very dramatic, turn away. After years of trying to train dogs (and I have) to respond to "no kisses", this was a no brainer, and so much kinder. Funny
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Old 06-09-2012, 11:01 AM   #138
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Addie, I have Psoriasis and Eczema, but it is seasonal. She licks it and it drives me crazy (not the licking, but the fact that she's removing meds that I really could use, and probably wouldn't be good for her).

Seriously, try the fake yawning thing. I was really surprised. Make a big yawn (not a polite one with your hand in front) and turn away. It was strange how quickly it worked.
I have done this twice now and immediately he jumped off the bed and went over to his corner and went to sleep. The first time I did it, I didn't tell my son about it. Then the second time, I told him what I was going to do. He was sceptical. So I showed him. Again immediate response from Teddy Bear.

In the wild, animals lick their wounds and they seem to heal faster. I wonder if this isn't their way of trying to heal your wounds. i.e. your psoriasis. Teddy Bear only licks the patches I have on my elbows. They seem to be related to stress. Right now I am concerned about the upcoming eye surgery and sure enough my elbows are breaking out. TB seems to be aware of this and just started licking them since March when all this started. I only put medication on them when they itch. Otherwise I just leave the patches alone. I have had psoriasis for more than 50 years. I don't even think about it unless I have a bad flareup or a spot itches.
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Old 06-09-2012, 01:42 PM   #139
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This morning I woke up to Violet licking my arm. I actaully (as opposed to intentionally) yawned so quickly turned away and she curled up and went back to sleep! I don't have any skin poblems but do sweat a lot at night and have thought the dogs wanted the salt.
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Old 06-10-2012, 11:57 PM   #140
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I have done this twice now and immediately he jumped off the bed and went over to his corner and went to sleep. The first time I did it, I didn't tell my son about it. Then the second time, I told him what I was going to do. He was sceptical. So I showed him. Again immediate response from Teddy Bear.

In the wild, animals lick their wounds and they seem to heal faster. I wonder if this isn't their way of trying to heal your wounds. i.e. your psoriasis. Teddy Bear only licks the patches I have on my elbows. They seem to be related to stress. Right now I am concerned about the upcoming eye surgery and sure enough my elbows are breaking out. TB seems to be aware of this and just started licking them since March when all this started. I only put medication on them when they itch. Otherwise I just leave the patches alone. I have had psoriasis for more than 50 years. I don't even think about it unless I have a bad flareup or a spot itches.
I do agree that I think our dogs are trying to "heal" our wounds. Also the salt thing. But they can get very annoying, especially when it is hot and you're sweating, and I cannot believe my prescription ointment can be good for her. When I read this I was amazed at how quickly it worked and emailed the dog trainer who writes the local column.

I think stress makes any and everything worse. The first time I showed symptoms it was odd. Over 50, and these red patches started showing up all over my body. I didn't think psoriasis or eczema, because my father has always had a fairly severe version of the former, and a sis, when young, had the latter, and it didn't look like either. When I pointed it out my regular doc asked me if I have a family history of eczema or psoriasis. Both. next thing I knew, my hair was falling out in clumps. Eczema on the bod, psoriasis on the head. I only had that one bad year. But bad it really was. I'm hoping for good luck in the future! And for you, too!
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