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Old 02-24-2012, 12:12 PM   #1
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Resumes

As some or most of you know I have been out of work since Oct. And I just wanted a general opinion...............do you think that posting resumes on-line work? Or would you go to where the job is being offered and submit a resume there knowing that it will just be handed over to someone else anyway.

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Old 02-24-2012, 12:27 PM   #2
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Do both. Posting online may be effective for some hiring managers and not for others. Delivering resumes by hand may be effective for some hiring managers. I got an interview and a job once because the hiring manager saw my resume at every turn and was impressed with my persistence.

If at all possible, get the name and title of the hiring manager and send your resume directly to him/her. Most applicants won't do that. Resumes typically go to Human Resources and they are often tasked with selecting out candidates based on a list of qualifications. Your resume might get tossed unfairly by someone who wouldn't recognize relevant qualifications.

Good luck
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Old 02-24-2012, 12:49 PM   #3
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I figure that many employers get tons of on line resumes. After all it is easy to do. You just sit at home and press a few buttons. Like Andy said, you have an advantage if you can get some facetime with the potential employer. I would do both. You don't ask a potential employer to hire you, you "tell" them that they need you to work there. Like most advertisement, it is important to place the message in somebodies head. "Hire me and you will get this, and that" etc. I went to a sales conference once and the guru said to try and make the person feel that they are at a disadvantage if they buy somewhere else. So, you need confidence and proof to back it up. But, not to the point that is is overbearing and arrogant. Because people don't want to be preached to or made feel stupid all day either. Just feel the person out and let them feel they are making the decision. Agree with them a lot. Looke impressed. People love their ego stroked...good luck.
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Old 02-24-2012, 04:05 PM   #4
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In addition to what has already been suggested, if you work in a technical field, give a copy of your resume to all of the local head hunters. They usually have a direct "in" with many employers and will do the door knocking for you. Plus they will often give you suggestions on how to beef up your qualifications so the resume really makes you shine.
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Old 02-24-2012, 04:16 PM   #5
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I once got a job because although the ad said to fax my resume, rather than pay money to fax it, I looked up the company name in the phone book and mailed it their address. He was so impressed I was hired on the spot.
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Old 02-24-2012, 08:03 PM   #6
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I think going in person is best.

Also depending on your field a temp to perm position can be a good way to go. It let's you and your employer have a "test drive" to see if the position may be a good fit.
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Old 02-24-2012, 08:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
I think going in person is best.

Also depending on your field a temp to perm position can be a good way to go. It let's you and your employer have a "test drive" to see if the position may be a good fit.
Great point, Aunt Bea. I worked temps for a long time. The biggest benefit was that each job taught me more and different programs on the computer. The more you know, the better job you can get.

Like Aunt Bea says, it's great way to find a permanent job you know you'll like.
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Old 02-26-2012, 09:52 AM   #8
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This is all true.....Couldn't find the link, this was a cut and paste.

What HR Won’t Tell You About Your Résumé

Condensed from Reader’s Digest Magazine, April 2011


Use key words—and not colored paper—plus other résumé tips from potential employers.
1. “Once you’re unemployed more than six months, you’re considered pretty much unemployable. We assume that other people have already passed you over, so we don’t want anything to do with you.” –Cynthia Shapiro, former human resources executive and author of Corporate Confidential: 50 Secrets Your Company Doesn’t Want You to Know
2. “When it comes to getting a job, who you know really does matter. No matter how nice your résumé is or how great your experience may be, it’s all about connections.” –HR director at a health-care facility
3. “If you’re trying to get a job at a specific company, often the best thing to do is to avoid HR entirely. Find someone at the company you know, or go straight to the hiring manager.” –Shauna Moerke, an HR administrator in Alabama who blogs at hrminion.com
4. “People assume someone’s reading their cover letter. I haven’t read one in 11 years.” –HR director at a financial services firm
5. “We will judge you based on your e-mail address. Especially if it’s something inappropriate like kinkyboots101@hotmail.com or johnnylikestodrink@gmail.com.” –Rich DeMatteo, a recruiting consultant in Philadelphia
6. “If you’re in your 50s or 60s, don’t put the year you graduated on your résumé.” –HR professional at a midsize firm in North Carolina
7. “There’s a myth out there that a résumé has to be one page. So people send their résumé in a two-point font. Nobody is going to read that.” –HR director at a financial services firm
8. “I always read résumés from the bottom up. And I have no problem with a two-page résumé, but three pages is pushing it.” –Sharlyn Lauby, HR consultant in Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9. “Most of us use applicant-tracking systems that scan résumés for key words. The secret to getting your résumé through the system is to pull key words directly from the job description and put them on. The more matches you have, the more likely your résumé will get picked and actually seen by a real person.” –Chris Ferdinandi, HR professional in the Boston area
10. “Résumés don’t need color to stand out. When I see a little color, I smirk. And when I see a ton of color, I cringe. And walking in and dropping off your resume is no longer seen as a good thing. It’s actually a little creepy.” –Rich DeMatteo
See also: What HR People Won’t Tell You About the Job Interview, What HR People Won’t Tell You About Salaries and Raises
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:04 AM   #9
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Another tip. Talk to EVERYBODY about looking for a job because you never know who has a contact that could help you.

My younger daughter was 'graduating' from kindergarten and I was chatting with her best friend's dad. I mentioned I was out of work and he asked for a resume. His neighbor was the HR manager for a computer company and he passed my resume on to a manager who was looking for someone (no advertised position). I got an interview and the job.
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:14 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Another tip. Talk to EVERYBODY about looking for a job because you never know who has a contact that could help you.
True. Before I retired, we rarely advertised/posted. Too many lawsuits. We got most of our people by word of mouth.

Pay special attention to #9, above. And I don't actually agree with #1, although you might be offered a lesser salary. This was true during the last recession.
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