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Old 08-13-2014, 06:44 PM   #41
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Again, not my thinking. I was reporting what was disclosed on the news that is all.
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Originally Posted by skilletlicker View Post
Don't be so touchy honey. I wasn't casting any aspersions on you. Heck, I don't even know what aspersions are. It's just human nature to look for rational causes for events that have no relation to reason.

By the way, I'm at least as crazy as any of you, and I got papers to prove it.

RIP RW

I said "again" because, if you had read a few posts up from your post, you would have seen that I had already just said what I had to repeat again to you. (Nothing to do with aspersions - I'm a tough cookie e.g. used to do stand up comedy ... and so loved Robin for that).
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Old 08-13-2014, 09:21 PM   #42
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The only good thing to come of this, is it has people talking and trying to understand the tragedy of suicide.

When I lost my brother 40 yrs ago the subject was taboo. I remember being asked how he died, and if I didn't want to talk about it, I'd say he had been ill for a long time and change the subject. It wasn't a lie, as he had been very ill with depression for years. For the most part in those days, people were looked upon as either being weak or a lunatic for doing such a thing. Sometimes I wonder if that opinion hasn't really changed all that much. For the family that's left behind, the torture of this kind of death goes on forever, both then and now. It is a horrible complicated grief like no other. Sadly, although RW may be resting in peace, his family is in a living hell.
+1 perhaps the good thing to come from RW's death will be that depression and mental illness will be taken seriously and not viewed as a weakness. It is not a weakness, it is an illness, just like cancer or heart disease or diabetes. The person can't get over it. The best is to get through it and survive, to keep on top of it and not allow oneself to go back to what I call the dark side of the moon.

When you lose a loved one, grief is a natural emotion. When you lose a loved one to suicide, grief is indeed complicated--there is the guilt for not recognizing the person was in unbelievable pain, etc., etc. It was the knowledge that I would hurt my family beyond belief that kept me from acting on suicidal ideations and get help. And, I have a doctor who is trained in helping those with chronic depression. Without her, well, I don't want to think about it.
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Old 08-13-2014, 09:58 PM   #43
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I've worked with kids for over 30 years. Every so often I've been called in to help with the aftermath of a suicide. It's the most devastating tragedy anyone could ever deal with. Beautiful children, with lives full of promise, gone. Depression is such an evil disease.

I still tear up hearing news about Robin Williams.
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Old 08-14-2014, 01:42 PM   #44
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BTW, I take offense at your use of the terms "just depression." The depression leads to the inability to function. There is nothing "just" about it. It is overwhelming and it doesn't happen overnight. Writing "just depression" suggests that your opinion is that he should have been able to "get over it." He wasn't able to "get over it." He was struggling to survive. Getting out of bed, taking a shower, getting dressed can be more than a person suffering from severe depression can face on a daily basis.

Severe depression and the person's inability to perform routine daily tasks usually leads to the breakdown of relationships and the ability to stay on top of things financially. The person suffering from depression is in shut-down mode and pushes people away. Depressed people often don't open their mail, pay their bills, take care of their environment, or answer the phone. It is easier torun away and hide from the world because the "world" is too overwhelming and they don't know how to get back on track because they weren't aware they were leaving the track until they are past the point of acute depression. Refrain from judging until you have walked a mile in that person's shoes.
In English english "just" is used synonymously with "only". If we say something is "not just xxx" it implies that xxx is part of the story but there is more is more to it than that.
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Old 08-14-2014, 04:45 PM   #45
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*sigh* And now it's being reported that his wife let it be known that RW was in the early stages of Parkinson's.

If that is the case, I can completely understand the despair that may have gripped him. There are many terrible diseases, but my personal fear is if I became stricken with a condition that has no cure/management, but instead is a slow decent into total disability. Not that I ever want to be seriously sick, but if I have to have something I'd rather battle cancer or a heart condition than something debilitating like Parkinson's, ALS, or scleroderma. Scleroderma seems like a really scary way to go; I knew a work-friend from back home that developed the condition after we had moved. Always active, I felt so very bad for her the rest of her life.
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Old 08-14-2014, 05:13 PM   #46
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The Pirate is a recovering drug addict. Unless he has something meaningful to do, he can slip very easily into a depression. So I let my housework go just to let him feel that I need him. He comes in and cleans my home from top to bottom. Even if it is only a few dirty dishes in the sink. But it keeps him busy and gives him a feeling of being needed. Occasionally, he will go in the back room and open up the spare bed I keep in there. Then that is the time I keep my eye on him. I know he is getting ready to shut down. I know what triggers to look for. Inactivity is the main one. Having no work for the day due to weather. I try to get him involved in some of the items that are on my bucket list. I know what he likes to do for me and what he considers a PITA. His depression keeps me on my toes.
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Old 08-14-2014, 05:23 PM   #47
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*sigh* And now it's being reported that his wife let it be known that RW was in the early stages of Parkinson's.

If that is the case, I can completely understand the despair that may have gripped him. There are many terrible diseases, but my personal fear is if I became stricken with a condition that has no cure/management, but instead is a slow decent into total disability. Not that I ever want to be seriously sick, but if I have to have something I'd rather battle cancer or a heart condition than something debilitating like Parkinson's, ALS, or scleroderma. Scleroderma seems like a really scary way to go; I knew a work-friend from back home that developed the condition after we had moved. Always active, I felt so very bad for her the rest of her life.
I hear you there CG. My late husbands dear uncle who just passed from Parkinson's was completely bed ridden and unable to even wipe his own chin. I'm the last person to ever condone suicide but I firmly believe there are things worse than death.
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Old 08-14-2014, 05:27 PM   #48
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I hear you there CG. My late husbands dear uncle who just passed from Parkinson's was completely bed ridden and unable to even wipe his own chin. I'm the last person to ever condone suicide but I firmly believe there are things worse than death.
The last I heard, Oregon passed a bill for Mercy deaths in cases of debilitating illnesses a few years back. Yea for Oregon.
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Old 08-14-2014, 06:16 PM   #49
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I remember when my dad became depressed. We really had no idea what we were dealing with at the time. He had been the provider for our family and a work injury had put him out of work. He suddenly became a person that couldn't function. My mom would leave him a list of errands to run while she was at work, but he couldn't seem to accomplish any of them. My mom was at her wits end.

We were lucky, we got him help, and medication, we eventually got dad back. Thing is after this he was never completely back to "normal", we had to keep a close eye on him. There was a point where he had given up on life, that was truly frightening.
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:50 PM   #50
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Lightbulb

I don't know if US has the news yet but, over here in UK, it has been disclosed by Robin's wife that he had the early stages of Parkinson's disease.

Poor man. A quickfired brain like his would be so crippled by it.
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