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Old 06-06-2012, 06:12 PM   #21
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I call cheese curds 'de croutes' which translated means crusts, but slang, it means poop.
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Old 06-07-2012, 03:17 AM   #22
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James calls Brussels sprouts "cabbage balls."
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Old 06-08-2012, 12:56 AM   #23
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Everyone knows bull's testicles are Rocky Mountain Oysters.

A favorite meal of mine when I was a kid was when my mom had saved up enough of the chicken innards to make enough for a family meal. The necks, livers, gizzards, hearts, and sometimes wings would be stewed, then a bag of egg noodles and of frozen vegetables would go in for a gooey (and to me, delicious) meal that us kids (I think I was the only one who truly loved it!) called "Gizzards and Lizards."

After living off and on for ten years in Hawaii, it took me awhile to refrain from inviting people over for "heavy pupus" (appetizers filling enough to pass for dinner).

"American Chow Mein" (or was that "chop suey'?) was elbow macaroni with spaghetti sauce made with ground beef, topped with American cheese slices.

Anyone from the upper Midwest knows it is "hot dish". Call it casserole, and you're a snob.
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Old 06-08-2012, 03:14 AM   #24
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Everyone knows bull's testicles are Rocky Mountain Oysters.

A favorite meal of mine when I was a kid was when my mom had saved up enough of the chicken innards to make enough for a family meal. The necks, livers, gizzards, hearts, and sometimes wings would be stewed, then a bag of egg noodles and of frozen vegetables would go in for a gooey (and to me, delicious) meal that us kids (I think I was the only one who truly loved it!) called "Gizzards and Lizards."

After living off and on for ten years in Hawaii, it took me awhile to refrain from inviting people over for "heavy pupus" (appetizers filling enough to pass for dinner).

"American Chow Mein" (or was that "chop suey'?) was elbow macaroni with spaghetti sauce made with ground beef, topped with American cheese slices.

Anyone from the upper Midwest knows it is "hot dish". Call it casserole, and you're a snob.
When I stayed a winter in Argyle, Minnesota with my aunt, uncle, and cousins, everywhere we went they were serving "hot dish and bars."
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Old 06-08-2012, 04:41 AM   #25
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Goatmeal...
Hey, that one is pure Canadian We have a cereal here called "Oatmeal Crisp" and the commercials have this guy keeping the cereal away from his family in many ways - one was telling his father that it was GOATmeal Crisp, made out of goats, "you wouldn't want to eat that". From then one, anything oatmeal is goatmeal!

I did the busghetti one too as a kid and I think my Dad would call it that every time I served it while he was living with us! Other ones I messed up were Chish and Fips, scalped potatoes, chicken popeyes and wopples (it's a wonder how I ever got into the food business!

Oh, and we would dip our "soldiers" into soft boiled eggs.

In Saskatchewan we had names for our donuts. When we moved to BC my Mom went into a bakery and asked for 1/2 dozen each of bismarks and long johns. The employee looked at her really strange so Mom pointed at what she wanted. The woman said "oh, jelly donuts and chocolate covered donuts". Who knew there was such a language barrier across provinces!
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Old 06-08-2012, 09:06 AM   #26
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Bismarks and long johns in MN as well. Boston cream doughnuts here. And the difference befween casserole and hotdish is this: a casserole is something you could serve the minister and his wife if they came for Sunday dinner. A hotdish you'd take to a church potluck or could serve friends and families. Casseroles had more expensive ingredients (not hamburger/ground beef), rather wild rice, broccoli, and ham or chicken or shrimp, that would be wild rice casserole. Made with hamburger and cream of mushroom soup, wild rice hotdish. Here bars are called squares. BTW, casserole entered the English language to mean the contents of the casserole dish instead of the container in which it was cooked in the mid-50s. So those who grew up in the '50s and '60s probably would still call "casseroles" hotdishes in the Midwest.
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Old 06-08-2012, 05:13 PM   #27
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I have never heard the term hotdish around here. Casserole is used frequently!

My mom and I refer to mac and cheese as black a bologna.. that stems from me being little and unable to pronounce my words correctly.
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:08 AM   #28
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When I was a kid my dad would come home from work with a huge hunk of a hard white cheese. He called it "shah-go" cheese. We all loved it but could never find it in our rural stores so he kept getting it from a friend at work. It wasn't until asiago cheese became popular that I realized it was probably our shahgo cheese.
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:17 AM   #29
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I have never heard the term hotdish around here. Casserole is used frequently!

My mom and I refer to mac and cheese as black a bologna.. that stems from me being little and unable to pronounce my words correctly.
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When I was a kid my dad would come home from work with a huge hunk of a hard white cheese. He called it "shah-go" cheese. We all loved it but could never find it in our rural stores so he kept getting it from a friend at work. It wasn't until asiago cheese became popular that I realized it was probably our shahgo cheese.
Love it!
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:28 PM   #30
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Love it!
There is another one that sticks around in my head... I once read a Dennis the Menace cartoon about tapioca pudding and he referred to it as either fish eyes or eggs. I would never even try it after that!
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