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Old 04-23-2012, 06:11 PM   #41
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I've lived in North Dakota and Wisconsin, summered many years in Ontario, spent plenty of time in Minnesota. I find the "Fargo" accent , while maybe slightly exaggerated, to be pretty accurate. I always get a kick out of listening to friends when I visit! li
M DH loves that Fargo accent...I can always tell when my mom has been back her hometown in very far north MN and spent time with my aunt and cousins...she has that lilt!
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Old 04-23-2012, 10:49 PM   #42
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uff da is actually a fairly common, old norwegian expression. i guess the norskie immigrants in meena-sow-tah have kept it alive and kicking.

taxy, like i said, the oot accent is heavier in some, but very slight in most other canadians i've met, but not all. i guess you're not one. i'm sorry if you were offended.

since i've apparently declared war on canada, another interesting accent up in the great white north is how to say again.

i've heard a lot of hockey players pronounce it a-gane (hard a) where most americans say uh-gen (hard g, soft e).

back to slang instead of accents, my neighbor's kid came over to borrow the lawnmower today. i laughed when i realized that he never outgrew his habit of saying "yo" in almost every sentence. he's 25 or 26 now, but he still talks like a teenage rapper.
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Old 04-23-2012, 11:11 PM   #43
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It's important to realize that most people with an accent/dialect...can't hear it! When they see it written out, they know they absolutely don't say it that way. My sisters and I used to drive one of my dad's work-study students nuts, asking him to say different things. He was from Boston and we were incorrigible.
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Old 04-23-2012, 11:16 PM   #44
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My mom's Maine accent is really thick, she's a hoot to listen to.
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Old 04-23-2012, 11:27 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
uff da is actually a fairly common, old norwegian expression. i guess the norskie immigrants in meena-sow-tah have kept it alive and kicking.

taxy, like i said, the oot accent is heavier in some, but very slight in most other canadians i've met, but not all. i guess you're not one. i'm sorry if you were offended.

since i've apparently declared war on canada, another interesting accent up in the great white north is how to say again.

i've heard a lot of hockey players pronounce it a-gane (hard a) where most americans say uh-gen (hard g, soft e).

back to slang instead of accents, my neighbor's kid came over to borrow the lawnmower today. i laughed when i realized that he never outgrew his habit of saying "yo" in almost every sentence. he's 25 or 26 now, but he still talks like a teenage rapper.
I'm not offended. It just doesn't sound that way to me. I hear Yanks say "aboot", imitating a Canadian, and it doesn't sound the way the Canadians say it. I admit that many, if not most, Canadians don't pronounce "about" the same way as Yanks do. To say that Canadians say "aboot" is equivalent to saying that Swedes sound like the Swedish Chef. Yes, there is some similarity, but it's not really what they sound like. Maybe if you don't listen carefully it sounds the same. And, maybe you have to hear it often enough to be able to distinguish it. There are certainly times when I say something in Danish and non-Danish speakers can't hear the difference between two sounds that are easy for me to distinguish.
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Old 04-23-2012, 11:35 PM   #46
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I learned a phonetic language/alphabet when I took theatre classes and of course can no longer remember it. Would be a much better descriptor. "Aboot" isn't really it, it's more "abouoot", only shorter. And I too remember Canadian friends saying "a-gane" instead of "agen".
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Old 04-24-2012, 02:14 AM   #47
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Gravy Queen and I come from Liverpool and we are known as SCOUSERS,scousers have their own accent and dialect, we are vilified by the rest of the UK. This is very unfair as it is those Manc B******* who cause all the trouble.

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Old 04-24-2012, 09:27 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I learned a phonetic language/alphabet when I took theatre classes and of course can no longer remember it. Would be a much better descriptor. "Aboot" isn't really it, it's more "abouoot", only shorter. And I too remember Canadian friends saying "a-gane" instead of "agen".
That's it! Well not exactly, but I can tell you have heard it. It's also sort of like "a boat"
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Old 04-24-2012, 07:33 PM   #49
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That's it! Well not exactly, but I can tell you have heard it. It's also sort of like "a boat"
I learned the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet). Oh goody, I get to be pedantic! Within any language, there is a range of acceptability re: pronunciation of a sound. This is why you have "ruff" for "rooof" and to-MAT-o for to-may-to. Depending on one's geographic location (and the isolation of the people in that location from other native speakers of the language--Newfoundland English is an example, as is the English spoken in the Bahamas, etc.), you will get what is called a vowel or consonant shift. Hence why people in the southern US stretch their vowels, don't have as much nasal, etc. when they speak. What constitutes this difference in pronunciation is what is called the normal position of rest of one's tongue in the mouth. All infants are born being able to mimic all sounds in all languages. As one learns a language, the position of the tongue is trained to rest in a certain position. Although I am a native English speaker, my exposure to Germanic languages means that I hit my consonants hard--this was especially problematic when learning French where syllables are open (end in vowels); in Germanic languages, syllables are closed. This is why people develop accents and why after the age of 13, it is very difficult for one to master the intonation and accent of another language as if one were a native speaker. I pass as a native speaker (from Northern Germany) in German until I try to say certain words that have a certain dipthong followed by a harsh consonant. In french, it is the "ll" that often gives people away. When I speak Swedish, people answer me in German. Yup, I have a Germanic accent in Swedish, as I do in French. But in English, I have that Midwest/Norski accent! Go figure.
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Old 04-24-2012, 10:21 PM   #50
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I aced a test in Esperato once upon a time many years ago. Weird.
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