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Old 04-25-2012, 12:31 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
As I tell tourists who seemed to be amused with my 'so called accent', we were the first here with the Pilgrims, so we started the English language here. What the rest of you folks do with it is your own fault.
You just reminded me of a joke from the '60s:

Why do the Kennedys say "Afriker" and "Cuber"?

Because they have two "r"s left over from "Hahvahd".
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Old 04-25-2012, 12:46 AM   #62
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He loved us, John was so tolerant of us and enjoyed our company. He became a nurse, is now a doctor and still a friend of the family. He still has an accent, despite living in this part of the country for 45 years.
I moved to South Texas, twenty miles north of Corpus Christi. Had never been out of Boston. I land and ask the cab driver to take me to Aransas Pass. After several tries of trying to understand at least one word I was saying, he handed me a piece of paper and a pencil so I could write it down. I never lost my accent when I was down there. Bostonians have a way of making one syllable words into two. Beer = Bee Ah. Ail = A Eel. It seemed to amuse Texans to no end. And one time as my neighbor later told me, she never knew she had a palah until I came along.
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Old 04-25-2012, 06:50 AM   #63
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Because much of my life has been spent in and around the military, I've come in contact with just about every accent you can imagine. My dad and his elder siblings still have a French-Canadian (Quebecoise, don't feel like looking up the accents) accent. Mom somehow laundered her New England accent during those years, but when she is around her family she starts to Pahk the Cah in Havaad.

I've noticed, too, that some people tend to, after a few years, start talking w/o their regional accent when face-to-face, then when you talk to them over the phone, the accent is stronger. Maybe it's just me; that I hear it more when I don't see the person talking.

When we were stateside we lived in Northern California, Nevada, Utah, Central California, and spent much time visiting family in the Mojave. To my ear, no discernable accent. My husband has traces of his Midwest origins. What I find interesting is that people from Illinois (he was born in Joliet) pronounce the first "I" as an "E" ... Ellen -noy.

The "Fargo" movie accent didn't even seem exaggerated to me. I was stationed in a very small ND town, and that's really how it sounded to me.

As I previously said, my friends when I was growing up, for some reason all had French speaking mothers; three were French, one was French-Canadian. I was out west when we were on the road, and Antoinette heard me say "kwu-bek". "Claire you know better," she sternly said, "now say that correctly." Oui Madame! Kay-bek."
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Old 04-25-2012, 06:59 AM   #64
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Being from Maine and having French speaking grandparents (they spoke very good "Maine" English) I learned to say "Kay-bek". Sometimes people look at me a little strange.
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Old 05-01-2012, 03:47 AM   #65
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Two four. In Canada, that means a case of 24 beer.

I just caught myself using it yesterday.
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Old 05-01-2012, 08:07 AM   #66
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Shrek uses, "Is it?" makes me crazy! I make a statement and he says, "Is it?" I just said so, didn't I?

"Shrek, it's raining." "Is it?"

I feel like I spend the whole day repeating myself or wondering why he doesn't believe me.
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Old 05-01-2012, 09:39 AM   #67
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A friend in high school in Ohio awakened me, embarrassingly, to my hillbilly accent when I asked if I could borrow a pen. He said he would lend me his "pen" but didn't have any "pins."

My older brother always said "warsh" for "wash" -- the only one in our family who said it that way. Don't know if he still does -- he has lived in Texas for years.

We who vacationed there always thought the Canadian English was charming, especially the "aboat" (as we heard it).
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Old 05-01-2012, 10:10 AM   #68
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Here in Bosotn, if it is 'good', it is wicked good. Anything that is good is wicked.
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:12 AM   #69
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To turn things slightly scatological...I was teasing my daughters that to ask to use the washroom in their french class they had to say, "Je dois pee pee" (I must pee pee) and so, to my amazement and delight our exchange student from Normandy told me the correct term in her world is, "Je dois faire pee pee" (I must make pee pee). I laughed so hard you have no idea. Reminds me of George Carlin's stand up.

I had no idea that going for coffee was a regional thing! Here we ask, "Do you want to go for coffee?"

How about the way you order your coffee from the barista? I might order a Maple Latte, half sweet. That means to only use half the flavor syrup. At most drive thru coffee spots, a "regular" coffee means one cream, one sugar, and a double double (as I mentioned) is two cream, two sugar. Black sweet, is one sugar no cream, and white is cream no sugar. Is it different in different areas?

BT, we know you aren't picking on Canadians, I'm sorry if you thought we were offended, I was just being silly with you. Luff you buddy!
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:28 AM   #70
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I didn't realize this until I worked in a restaurant for a day: a regular coffee in Montreal is 1.5 tsps of sugar and one creamer (15 ml, ~.5 ounce).
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