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View Poll Results: Should the USA Convert to the Metric System?
NO! Absolutely not. Never! 31 39.24%
YES! It's idiotic not to! 30 37.97%
I don't care. What's the difference 6 7.59%
I suppose so, some day 8 10.13%
It's HARD. I'd have to think to follow a recipe 4 5.06%
Voters: 79. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-17-2007, 11:31 PM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
I completely disagree.
Excellent. Why don't we figure out exactly what we disagree about. My preference for inches over centimeters is a reflection of a wider societal and cultural preference with which I grew up and am now comfortable with. It also is the unit of measurement used in recipes shared formally (cookbooks) and informally (how Mom did it). Surely you can't argue that this isn't at least a small part of the "culture" most of us grew up with.
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Originally Posted by GB
Language is a different animal altogether
The difference is a matter of degree not of kind. Language is certainly a much larger part of the culture but unless you disagree with my point above, both are parts.
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Originally Posted by GB
not to mention that there are hundreds and hundreds of different one. Not just two
Do you have any doubt that there are not at least "hundreds and hundreds" of different standards of measurement? I'm not widely travelled so I will rely here on what I assume to be self-evident assumtions. Aborginal Australians, South American Indians, Eskimos, Sub-Saharan Africans, Vikings, Arabs, Persians, Indians, Chinese, etc., etc. all developed standards of measurement. Is it remotely possible that all but two of these systems are dead or exinct. Or is it just much more likely that only the imperial system warrants condemnation.
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Originally Posted by GB
one of which is used by 3 countries and one used by everyone else
I feel like the only one who notices that the metric system IS used in the US. If you buy foodstuffs here look at any bag or can in your pantry. There is also a chronology of our conversion here. GB, your comment also and again overlooks cultures that in addition to their use of the metric system use more traditional measurements in many of their homes and businesses. The Chinese might be one example.
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Originally Posted by GB
Some languages have words or ideas that do not exist in other languages. That is not true with units of measure.
This is just patently untrue. A becquerel is a unit of radiation measurment that obviously has not always existed as a concept in any system.

So GB, my hunch is that all we really disagree on is the the precise meaning of metrication.
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Old 07-18-2007, 12:10 AM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitmondol
Well....
I am sorry if my posts did offend anybody.
As I said earlier I was not the least offended. And I apologize if it seemed that I was.
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Originally Posted by mitmondol
I do believe though that the USA should use metric.
As the comperison to language?
Most of the world uses English as the common language.
Even in EU, where (for the most part) German used to be the common language, the younger generations learned English instead.
Did you really mean instead or in addition.

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Originally Posted by mitmondol
It is more logical to use for many reasons, so people of the world adapted, or should I say "converted" to it.
And yes, I am saying that with the metric system a whole lot of things would be easier .
And I also think that the imperial system was working for a long time, I understand that tradition counts for a lot of things, but I also think if something better is available we should let go of the old.
Why is it important to you that I "let go of it?" Why isn't it good enough to be fluent with both systems?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitmondol
This is not mean or rude,and it could even be the other way around.
The world could've adopted the imperial system.
But it didn't.
So, without argueing which is better, wouldn't it make more sence for the US to hop on the wagon?
Here is the explicit insistence on either/or. I prefer fluency with both.
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Originally Posted by mitmondol
Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
I can speak metric, I just don't want to.
Care to tell why not?
More accurately, I just don't want to be told to.
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Old 07-18-2007, 12:24 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
As I said earlier I was not the least offended. And I apologize if it seemed that I was.
Did you really mean instead or in addition.

Why is it important to you that I "let go of it?" Why isn't it good enough to be fluent with both systems?

Here is the explicit insistence on either/or. I prefer fluency with both.
More accurately, I just don't want to be told to.

Yes, it is good to be fluent in both.
You just don't want to be told?
Why not?
Most of the world was told.
Most of the world adapted English because they had to, either being told or realizing to be better off.
How many other things were you told you had to accept? And you did. No choice.
I have a feeling you just like to be philosofical about the whole thing.
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Old 07-18-2007, 12:36 AM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitmondol
Yes, it is good to be fluent in both.
You just don't want to be told?
Why not?
Most of the world was told.
Most of the world adapted English because they had to, either being told or realizing to be better off.
How many other things were you told you had to accept? And you did. No choice.
I have a feeling you just like to be philosofical about the whole thing.
Thanks for making your position clear.
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Old 07-18-2007, 12:56 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by skilletlicker
Thanks for making your position clear.
Still friends right?
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:08 AM   #66
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Still friends right?
Of course! Agreeable disagreement among family members demonstrates openness, honesty and respect.
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:34 AM   #67
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Old 07-18-2007, 03:29 AM   #68
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Glad to hear that everyone is friends again and what interesting tete a tetes! If I may add one thing to this thread that might be helpful for those of you being posted to a country with a metric system or those of you going to a country with the American system and you're not familiar with either, do invest in a good quality electronic scale that converts kg/lb (which also includes for smaller amounts grams/oz). I have found it INVALUABLE as I have lived in 3 different countries all with metric systems. I acquired mine about 10 years ago and it's made by Salter. I have bought meat in kg and placed it on the scale and it's pretty accurate to what's been marked on the package as well as in pounds, etc. I measure butter on it all the time as butter here is sold by grams and not by sticks. REally makes a difference if you're baking. The good quality ones are not cheap but they are worth every penny, Euro, etc., especially if you cook a lot. Also invest in measuring cups that are both marked in metric and non. Really does help. :)
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Old 07-18-2007, 07:42 AM   #69
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NZ went metric in July 1967, and after that I could do the math! So much easier, tho we still talk the newborn baby's weight in pounds and ounces. We can visualise that! If a date for changeover is set, followed up by plenty of advertising, the kids are well taught, and businesses given time to change systems, then it will work. People quickly get used to the new when they use it daily. Look at how we can all use the internet now, when a few years ago, how many of us had a PC? Heck, my mum has just got her 1st computer at 87, and she's keen to learn new stuff.
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Old 07-18-2007, 02:36 PM   #70
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When I tell my friends that my favorite part of travel is going to a grocery store and buying some cheese, bread, wine, etc, for a picnic, they ask me how I deal with metric conversions. I DON'T. I don't even try. I go find something that is being sold that looks about the right size, then start to get used to it. If you drink at all, you drink metrically (750 ml). I'm not very mathematically minded at all, so I don't attempt conversions at all. You don't need to. It isn't like money where you have no choice (most of us travel on a budget and have to convert in our heads), but when it comes to metric, just go for it. Everyone would be used to it within months, and the next generation will wonder why we were using a system so difficult (it is a lot easier to divide and multiply by ten rather than by 12 or 16 or ....).
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