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Old 09-19-2014, 06:04 PM   #31
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Her choices looked better this week. I'd nit pick and say that since the yogurt wasn't on sale, that maybe she try the store brand to save a bit, since it's plain there is likely to be less of a difference.

Those peppers were a steal.

The broth base while not really a necessity, can go a long way flavoring stuff for a relatively small amount of money.
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Old 09-19-2014, 06:12 PM   #32
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Her choices looked better this week. I'd nit pick and say that since the yogurt wasn't on sale, that maybe she try the store brand to save a bit, since it's plain there is likely to be less of a difference.

Those peppers were a steal.

The broth base while not really a necessity, can go a long way flavoring stuff for a relatively small amount of money.
Next week at MB, Red Peppers are on sale for $1.29 for a bagful. So whatever a bag weighs depends on how many peppers are in it. Unless you use them quickly within the week, you could possibly lose them. So they may not prove to be quite the bargain in the end. We usually pay anywhere from $2.99 to $3.99 a lb. for red, yellow, orange peppers. Sometimes even as much as $4.99. She will definitely get her money's worth from the broth base. If she chooses to make a soup during one week, it will really come in useful.
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Old 09-19-2014, 06:15 PM   #33
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No sales tax on food or clothes in Minnesota, either.

I'm just wondering... would it be less expensive to make your own yogurt? I've only done so once. For many years I made all my own bread, which (at the time) cost an average of 50 cents a loaf. I still make homemade wine, soft drinks, tortillas, ketchup, mustard, hot sauces, pickles, sauerkraut, etc.

Depending on how much of a DIY-er one is, you can save a lot of money on food by purchasing the base ingredients and making your own.

Regarding peppers, I bought a tray of 5 bell peppers at the farm market last weekend for $3. I doubt they take food stamps, though.
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Old 09-19-2014, 06:24 PM   #34
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We have a farmer's market every Thursday during the summer here in Eastie. One of the conditions of being allowed to sell here is that they accept food stamps. The same sellers go to different neighborhoods during the week with the same selling conditions. I went one year. Transportation was provided. It was loaded with elderly from all the housing complexes for the elderly we have here. Never again. Too crowded for me and too difficult to walk on uneven ground. (Grass)
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Old 09-19-2014, 06:32 PM   #35
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No sales tax on food or clothes in Minnesota, either.

I'm just wondering... would it be less expensive to make your own yogurt? I've only done so once. For many years I made all my own bread, which (at the time) cost an average of 50 cents a loaf. I still make homemade wine, soft drinks, tortillas, ketchup, mustard, hot sauces, pickles, sauerkraut, etc.

Depending on how much of a DIY-er one is, you can save a lot of money on food by purchasing the base ingredients and making your own.

Regarding peppers, I bought a tray of 5 bell peppers at the farm market last weekend for $3. I doubt they take food stamps, though.
We have some vendors that do take food stamps. There is something that the big state farmer's market does that gives people bonus dollars if they are using their food stamp card for fresh fruit and veg, it's something like $20 worth of fresh veg and fruit for spending $10 at the farmer's market. It's a really good plan, to not only help people out, but give them incentive to eat good stuff!
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Old 09-19-2014, 06:52 PM   #36
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Next week at MB, Red Peppers are on sale for $1.29 for a bagful. So whatever a bag weighs depends on how many peppers are in it. Unless you use them quickly within the week, you could possibly lose them. So they may not prove to be quite the bargain in the end. We usually pay anywhere from $2.99 to $3.99 a lb. for red, yellow, orange peppers. Sometimes even as much as $4.99. She will definitely get her money's worth from the broth base. If she chooses to make a soup during one week, it will really come in useful.
Whenever I come across a great deal on red, yellow or orange peppers, I roast some and, if I can't use them quickly, I freeze them. They work great in soups and sauces once thawed.

Beth also said she likes to dip cut veggies in hummus, which seems to be a staple for her.
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Old 09-19-2014, 07:27 PM   #37
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Our NYS sponsored farmers market exchanges SNAP benefits for plastic tokens that the vendors accept and redeem for cash at the end of the day.

The idea of making things from scratch is one that I continue to ponder. If you have gradually put together a well stocked pantry then it can be cost effective to make many things instead of buying them. If you are broke and living week to week then it is often cheaper just to buy an item and not make it from scratch. Being broke carries an additional hidden expense that most people don't see, the idea of buying the cake mix and the can of frosting instead of going into the pantry and having all the items needed to bake a cake etc...

I do pretty well on a limited grocery budget as long as I stick to the basic meats and seasonal fresh vegetables. The tough part is trying to buy a few manufactured foods like a jar of mayonnaise or pickles, one item can consume 10% of the weeks budget. Like most things in life it gets easier as you become more experienced.
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Old 09-19-2014, 07:30 PM   #38
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Ohio doesn't charge for most food items at the check-out. The one exception I remember was that pop was taxed, and, oddly enough, ready-to-serve juice was taxed IF it was reconstituted from concentrate. Fresh-made juices were not taxed. Not sure if taxing orange juice from the dairy department was based on those conditions though since we always bought fresh-not-from-frozen OJ.


Quote:
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...Regarding peppers, I bought a tray of 5 bell peppers at the farm market last weekend for $3. I doubt they take food stamps, though.
Back in 2008 Westport CT restaurateur Michel Nischan was instrumental in gaining momentum for food stamp acceptance at Farmers' Markets, especially in getting the government to support doubling the purchasing power of the food stamp value if it was being used for produce. If I'm remembering correctly, he even went to far as to conduct small cooking classes to prepare those foods in small, neighborhood restaurant kitchens just so the residents in those needy parts of the city knew how to prepare and serve foods they might not be familiar with.
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Old 09-19-2014, 08:12 PM   #39
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I know at Market Basket in Chelsea, the produce manager goes through all of the products and removes those that are not as fresh looking today as they were yesterday. They are marked down and are quickly snatched up by those on SNAP. They don't sit there very long. What doesn't sell, is sent to the Boston Food Bank for kitchens that cook for the homeless.
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Old 09-19-2014, 08:44 PM   #40
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some of the supermarkets around me have a reduced produce cart. i usually am able to out run the little old ladies to get what i need first.

j/k addie.

i always out run them.


ok, really, j/k.



i really do snatch up the reduced apples, citrus, and certain veggies to feed my parrots, though. feeding parrots fresh fruits and veg everyday gets really expensive.
it also allows me to have extra inexpensive stuff on hand to be more creative in my cooking. i regularly use one or two of the things i'd bought for the birds in a last minute recipe, or to try something new.
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