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Old 08-05-2007, 02:44 PM   #41
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Is this the pic? And YES, I'll take a Long Island iced tea!!!!

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Old 08-05-2007, 02:46 PM   #42
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Is this the pic? And YES, I'll take a Long Island iced tea!!!!
That's the one. HA. My tea vanished. Elf has magic powers. lol
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Old 08-06-2007, 10:10 AM   #43
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This thread reminds me of the “How to boil and egg” thread. I never thought there could be so much discussion about iced tea! Amazing what you take for granted at times.

I like Luzianne as well. Also Lipton makes a good tea which is what I use most often. Both are an Orange Pekoe tea, and taste pretty much the same...although I think Lipton’s is a bit stronger. I grew up drinking it sweetened, and that’s the way I prefer it today.

I usually can’t stand anyone else's tea, so I never order it when I’m out, especially from a fast food place. However, Milo’s makes an excellent sweetened tea. It too is an Orange Pekoe.


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Interestingly enough, I learned something today about tea from the Milo’s website:

Tea comes in three different varieties, black green and oolong. The three types of tea, green, black and oolong, come from the same tea plant, the Camellia sinensis, a white flowered evergreen. The differences between these teas results from differing methods of processing the leaves. Different varieties of Camellia sinesis grow in different geographic areas and produce leaves that vary from a very small China leaf, perhaps one-half to three-quarters of an inch long, to the Assam leaf, which may be 3 or 4 inches long. Certain varieties are better suited than others for a particular process method. Thus, for example, a China leaf produces great oolongs.

So, what is orange pekoe? This refers to the size of the tea leaf. Processed tea leaves are sorted into sizes by passing them over screens with different size holes. The larges leaves are orange pekoe, pekoe and pekoe souchong. The smaller or broker leaves are classified as broken orange pekoe, broken pekoe souchong, broken orange pekoe fannings, and fines (also called "dust").

When brewing tea, flavor and color come out of larger leaves more slowly than out of broken and fine grades. The broken grades, which comprise approximately 80% of the total black tea crop, produce a stronger, darker tea. The grades have nothing to do with the quality or flavor of tea; they simply refer to leaf size.
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Old 08-06-2007, 11:22 PM   #44
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Tea comes in three different varieties, black green and oolong. The three types of tea, green, black and oolong, come from the same tea plant, the Camellia sinensis, a white flowered evergreen.
considering how many people drink tea, man, that's some big plant!
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Old 08-07-2007, 12:11 AM   #45
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Quote:
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considering how many people drink tea, man, that's some big plant!
Little Tea-Shop of Horror?!?!?!
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Old 08-07-2007, 08:10 AM   #46
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It is my opinion that we are all probably more alike than we realize. Food that used to be typically southern is eaten all over the states, even the world in some cases. Food that used to be classified as other origins, are made in the south as well. Our area being highly medical, naval, insurance, etc. has brought people from all over and it has influenced our food choices greatly. Also we have so many people retiring from the north, the west, etc they bring their preferences and we enjoy those also.
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Old 08-07-2007, 09:55 AM   #47
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I have always been an iced tea drinker, fresh brewed, very strong, occasionally lemon, never sweetener. Growing up a little north and west of Boston, any place I'd ever ordered iced tea, it was unsweetened, although they'd offer sweetener, which I always politely declined. Then I spent the next chunk of my life a little north of San Diego. Same thing, iced tea comes unsweetened, with an offer of sweetener on the side. Then my first cross-country road trip, taking me across The South. I don't know where I was, some drivethru down there... I ordered iced tea... and thirstily took a sip... *gag* *choke* *sputter* the viscosity was too thick to be soda and no bubbles... what had they given me?? It was Swite Tay. The girl, who was very sweet herself, let me know that I had to order it "UNswite" to get unsweetened iced tea. It just struck me funny when they asked if I wanted Sweet or Unsweet at lunch the other day.

In Amsterdam, all the iced tea I could find was from a mix... it always came in a very small glass and they offered gas or no gas (carbonation.... took me a bit to figure that out too!) One night I ordered a pitcher of iced tea, because I was dying for a big glass of iced tea, even if it was mix iced tea... it was about a liter... and when we looked at our dinner check it cost 9 euro!!!

The other night Sprytelette (who BTW LOVES sweet tea, since McDonald's has started serving it too) went out to our local Asian Bistro for sushi...when she came home she told me I had to try their Thai iced tea... that had a float of sweetened coconut milk on top.

It was cool reading about all of your iced tea experiences!
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Old 08-08-2007, 12:47 AM   #48
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lol, in consideration of the north/south thing.

the south has crept over the mason dixon line. unless you like young girls and swite tay...
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Old 08-08-2007, 01:03 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spryte
In Amsterdam, all the iced tea I could find was from a mix... it always came in a very small glass and they offered gas or no gas (carbonation.... took me a bit to figure that out too!) One night I ordered a pitcher of iced tea, because I was dying for a big glass of iced tea, even if it was mix iced tea... it was about a liter... and when we looked at our dinner check it cost 9 euro!!!
You know, I had a similar experience in France. Was there for about 6 weeks and noticed that water wasn't served automatically in restaurants. The table wine flowed freely but my timing was crap. (I was old and pregnant at the time so I couldn't have alcohol.) I saw iced tea on every menu but to my amazement, it always arrived as canned Lipton Peach flavored iced tea, which is heavily sweetened to boot! No kidding. Even in very expensive and lovely restaurants. And depending upon the restaurant, it cost as much as 5 Euros a can! Thank heavens the coffee was always fabulous. So I guess the whole iced tea thing is really American!

Terry
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Old 08-13-2007, 04:34 AM   #50
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Hi,

I understand iced tea without sugar is the only way..I had once visited Captain Cook in my area and they had served superb iced tea with a dash of giner in it. try it...you will love it.


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I ordered my lunch at the drivethru of Arby's. When I asked for iced tea, they asked if I wanted Sweet or UnSweet!!!

Sweet tea... YUCK!!!!
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