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Old 08-08-2007, 06:46 PM   #51
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When I was much younger, I had a roommate who was from Maryland. I'm from OH. She got so upset everytime I mentioned "pop", the accepted Midwest term. She'd scream: "Pop is married to your Mom. It's soda!"
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Old 08-08-2007, 07:49 PM   #52
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One term I'd never heard until I moved here was what the wheeled "vehicles" the grocery stores have for your goods. I always called them grocery carts. Here, they're called "buggies." Grocery bags here are called "sacks" as someone has already mentioned.
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Old 08-08-2007, 07:55 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katie E
I always called them grocery carts. Here, they're called "buggies."
Ya mean they ain't buggies?? What's the world comin too!
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Old 08-08-2007, 08:06 PM   #54
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We call them shopping carts
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Old 08-08-2007, 08:58 PM   #55
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I took the test, and I'm 52% Dixie. That sounds about right. I've lived in southern Illinois most of my life, except for a couple of years in Texas, and a couple more on the bayou in southern Louisiana. Where I live is only an hour and a half from Kentucky, while we're 6+ hours from Chicago, so I'm closer to the south than I am to the north! The yankees up there call us "hillbillies", and the people down south call us Yanks. Oh, well.

One thing I have noticed as I've traveled around...Texans, Cajuns, and native Floridians are really not "Dixie". They have their own accents. Actually, they pretty well have their own countries.
Kentuckians have more drawl than any of the afore mentioned. I had an aunt and uncle who lived in Madisonville, Ky, and my aunt was born and raised in that area. One day, she "carried" us out to their country club. They called daylight savings time "fast time", and even one person was "y'all".
My dad was from Iowa, and he called a burlap bag a toe sack. Up there, what we call soda is pop. They call a concrete road, like the interstate, a "hard road", and an asphalt road is "the black-top".

Some of the older people around here used to say "You'ins", while the younger ones tend to say "You Guys". I spent enough time in the south that I say "you all", but "y'all" never came naturally to me.
In Texas, I learned about "bad mouthin". I learned a lot of other things there, too, but that's not for discussion here. Down there, they called me "yank", and got a big laugh out of the fact that I thought that school would be out the day after my birthday. In Illinois, we celebrate Lincolns birthday on Feb 12. They don't celebrate Lincolns birhday, but Jefferson's Davis' birthday is a state holiday. Oops!

When I was in my teens, I met a boy from Chicago while my family was on vacation in Wisconsin. Richie and I had a mad, passionate puppy love, and since my aunt and uncle lived in Chicago, and my parents went back to the fishing lodge in Wisconsin every year, we were able to see each other now and then. Dating a northern city boy was a big education for me. Sometimes I had no idea what he was talking about, and it blew my mind that he had to get out a map to find out how to get someplace in his own home town! Anyway, he had a "poypul" (purple) cahhh (car), and called me "Cahhnee".

I had a friend who had lived in Minnesota for many years, and we used to tease her about her accent. She used to say things like "You BET'cha" and "yah".

Those from places like California, Colorado and New Mexico have so little accent that is is an accent of it's own.

Isn't it cool, that we are all so different, and yet have so much in common.
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Old 08-08-2007, 09:15 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob
Ya mean they ain't buggies?? What's the world comin too!
Amen! It's a buggie!

Just asked DW what they are called, and she said "cart" or "shopping cart".

Huh? So I asked again, and blow me down, she called it a "cargo cart". What the.........? Where'd that come from?????????

Again I asked and she said........."Buggie"?

Yes dear, it is a buggie?

Dang....and we've been married 7 years already.........we gots to have a talk!
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Old 08-08-2007, 09:34 PM   #57
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......And what part of the South is she from Keltin?

I agree! Ya gotta have a long talk with that girl!!
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Old 08-08-2007, 09:43 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob
......And what part of the South is she from Keltin?

I agree! Ya gotta have a long talk with that girl!!
Agreed! Odd thing is, even though I knew there were differences in our vocabulary (hose pipe??????), this thread has been a focal point of humor and, believe it or not, learning….she’s got even MORE that I’ve never heard of…..a cargo cart? What is that?

She’s from Tennessee….and she has informed me of an old farmer’s thing called the “Dead Wagon”. Have you (or anyone else) ever heard of the Dead Wagon?

Apparently, back in the day, on farms with large animals, if you had a large animal such as a hog or horse to die, then you could call a guy (for free) that would pick up the carcass and haul it off in his “Dead Wagon”.

Never heard of that one, but we did have a Vet when I grew up that made house calls for shots and such…….dead wagon?????? Sounds like a Stephen King novel!
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Old 08-08-2007, 10:43 PM   #59
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I was born a Yankee and was taught the spoken work by a fastidious mother who abhored poor language. Our speech was corrected regularly. I was also an advanced reader, perusing university level text in 6th grade. I have an extraordinary vocabulary, and have studied more subjects than I can ever hope to understand, and so I learned a little about a great lot.

I lived in Memphis for a year, and Southern California for ten years. I also lived in the Spokane Washington area for a year. I was in the U.S. Navy and was able to visit a good number of Pacific areas, including Australia.

All of this travel made me a changed man when I returned to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I had tried new and wonderous things, explored new activities, and made freinds from all over the U.S. and several coutries.

What I discovered is that there are many dialects and lifestyles in this world. I call a carbonated soft drink either a pop, or soda pop, depending on the company I am with. I learned horse skills from a Texan, a great freind. When with him, I quikly learned new phrases and words that allowed us to communicate freely.

Growing up, I always felt that the dialect from my area was the one closest to the universal American English taught to news-anchors, and the professional journalists. And, I foolishly thought that it was the correct English. But I eventually learned that my little piece of Heaven had its own colloquialisms, such as improperly using the word ignorant to mean rude, i.e. "He was so ignorant to her when she had simply asked him to dance." My Grandmother called her sofa/hide-a-bed a davenport. And she conjugated the phrase - pretty near - to pertineer, as in "I was pertineer exhausted by the time I climbed six flights of stairs."

I don't eat mud-cats as I don't enjoy the flavor of catfish from muddy water. I do eat catfish caught in the pristine waters of Lake Superior. Up here, we love a mess of brookies caught from a stream, or some good walleye (pickeral in Canadian lingo). I find some southern phrases to be at the best, condescending, as when a person says something like - "That poor woman has gained twenty pounds over the summer, bless her soul". As if gossiping about the weight gain of another is somehow made Ok by adding "...bless her soul".

I love some of the Southern customs and the easy grace of the south. But I admire the toughness and tenacity of one who can camp in a tent, in sub-zero weather, just to catch a few pike through a diminutive hole in the ice. I;ve done winter camping, and as a child, have played in the winter until the cuffs of my mittens were frozen with a ring of ice, so that I couldn't get them off of my hands until they thawed. I've been so close to frost-bite so many times, I can't count them. And yet, I am able to endure pain, and tieredness that sends most into their warm and comfortable homes. It gives you a kind of mental toughness.

I have to admit, that just as I call my Southern California Wife a "cold-weather-wimp", I am just the opposite. When the mercury climbs to the upper 80's, and into the 90's, it saps my strength and can even make me nauseous. The only time I seemed to be immune to the heat was when I was dirt-biking in Southern California.

I love aspects of the South, and of the North. But I'm a northerner through and through, not necessarily a Yankee, but a Northerner.

As far as the labels go, to me, they are just labels. I choose to take the best of wherever I may be, and count myself lucky to find so many good people in so many places. A person who accepts labels, or defines hem/hersself by a label, be it racial, regional, religous, or whatever, accepts limits. I accept no limits and consider the world my playground, and all the people in it prospective freinds.

I am proud to be a northerner, for the toughness that a northern lifestyle can nurture. I choose to live in the north because I melt in the south.

The thing that suprised me, in my home-town, was the level of predjudice that existed here, that I never knew about as a child. And the speech tendencies of many I know border on pigeon English, especially among some of my Native relatives and freinds who live in the very rural areas. The stubborn refusal to learn correct pronunciation and usage of language drives me crazy. You just couldn't believe how some people pronounce words around here, especially those of hispanic origin. anything having to do with queso is con queso, pronounced - kon-kwayso. Tortillas become prononunced as they are spelled, with the L-sound distinctly heard - tor-till-uhs. Itallian is often heard - hi-tal-yun, with a long I sound.

I could go on.

I love the subtle nuances of the French language, but love English for its versatiltiy. I love the customs and foods of every region of the world I've had the opportunity to visit.

I love to poke fun at Texans, but admit, I've had some very, very good freinds from that state.

And besides, down south, you guys just can't get maple syrup from your back yard. How can a guy live in a place where he can't get maple syrup from his back yard? But then again, I can't go crabin' or enjoy a shrimp or crab boil. We do have corn boils though. Corn grows perfectly well up here, thank you.

And you don't have Goodweed's pancake breakfast every spring, with freshly boiled maple syrup!

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 08-08-2007, 11:10 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Always Right Goodweed of the North
How can a guy live in a place where he can't get maple syrup from his back yard?
Having lived on the Canadian border in Vermont I have to admit you have a valid question here Or go snow skiing on May 23rd?
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