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Old 09-04-2014, 11:29 PM   #21
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My first thought after reading the article is that, if true, we've developed into a culture of crybabies. But I also have to wonder where they found some of these people. It's like the author and researchers purposely sought out the worst families they could find.

My wife and I have always worked full time jobs. As the primary cook, I don't recall ever feeling stress about putting a meal on the table. We also made sure we sat down and ate together as a family every night, without disruption from television, gameboys, or cell phones. I don't think we were alone.

It wasn't always "The Waltons," but it certainly wasn't anything like some of the scenarios described, either.

And anyone who cared to complain about the meal was more than welcome to help themselves to peanut butter and bread in the cupboard.
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Old 09-04-2014, 11:56 PM   #22
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Interesting article. I thought this was a little harsh, though...
".....it's expensive and time-consuming and often done for a bunch of ingrates who would rather just be eating fast food anyway."

My daughter could be that mom in the pic. A baby on one hip, the oldest one that she's letting help in the kitchen, and the middle one is the one to get the plastic plates on their little table. They're ages 1, 3, and 5 and they can definitely afford them , but feeding them is a challenge right now. The oldest loves veggies but isn't a fan of proteins, the middle loves proteins but not a fan of veggies, and the littlest little is, well, one year old and just getting used to non-mashed food as he gets more teeth. Hubby is a firefighter and often gone for several days at a time. She has help come in one full day once a week for some relief, and spends it re-grouping, getting caught up on laundry, and spending time with her best friend.

So yes, she does choose to spend some of that time doing something else.

She does her best, and is trying to stay away from the hype that says she needs to prepare a well rounded meal every single day. They have their chicken nuggets days, cereal for dinner, and an occasional pizza delivered like most everyone else does. It's not going to hurt as long as it's not every day.

I got on a roll here, but you asked what I thought.
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Old 09-05-2014, 12:20 AM   #23
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My parents both worked full-time running their own businesses. To have take out pizza or TV dinners was a TREAT for us. My mother never enjoyed cooking. My father never learned to cook. From the time I was in 9th grade, I was in charge of making supper (once I got home from swim/ski/track practice). Growing up, even with my brothers' hockey schedules and my swim/ski/track schedules, we sat down and ate together. Picky eater? Not allowed. Once my parents bought the restaurant, we'd either gather there after our various after school activities or my mom would bring home meals from the restaurant. Convenience? Yes, there are convenience foods but although I was craving KFC tonight (a craving I have about every 3 years), I opted to dress some so sweet, tender cabbage from the garden.
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Old 09-05-2014, 12:22 AM   #24
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Yup Cheryl, you and Steve are right. Whiny baby brats. And I'm talking about the adults.

I think part of the problem falls on the shoulders of all those cooking shows that are so popular. In half an hour the chef-host prepares a tasty entry, which was preceded by a gourmet quality appetizer and is followed by a dessert worthy of an upscale restaurant's dessert cart. Home cooks are sometimes made to feel ashamed if they reach for dry pasta, a jar of sauce, and those pre-cooked chicken sausages.

The "fresh produce costs too much" has been disproved too. If you buy in-season you can find filling veggies and fruits that will cost less than those convenience foods.

And picky eaters? Don't dance around their taste buds! I never cooked special meals for either of our kids. They too had a PB&J option. When they got older they were also welcome to reheat any leftover that they found to their liking in the refrigerator after they tried the new food under the "two bites" rule. There aren't many foods either of our kids turn their noses up at. They could give Andrew Zimmern a run for him money.
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Old 09-05-2014, 12:36 AM   #25
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preaching to the choir gets expected results.

they lost me with the straw man argument of socio-economic distress.

whatever happened to "parenting is a sacrifice, so..."

my dad never ended that statement. but i've come to realize the second half doesn't have words. it's in your heart.
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Old 09-05-2014, 12:59 AM   #26
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I could never understand the 'fresh produce costs too much' either. (as compared to packaged frozen meals or fast food). I went through a period many years ago when I was so poor I couldn't afford anything but a fresh veggie and dried bean soup. Necessity is the mother of invention.
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Old 09-05-2014, 01:01 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
preaching to the choir gets expected results.

they lost me with the straw man argument of socio-economic distress.

whatever happened to "parenting is a sacrifice, so..."

my dad never ended that statement. but i've come to realize the second half doesn't have words. it's in your heart.
Like.
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Old 09-05-2014, 05:35 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Just about everything you do generates some level of stress.

I think it depends on the circumstances and the individuals. Some men/women may take great pleasure from cooking and find it relaxing or even fulfilling. Others will hate it and do anything to avoid cooking. We personally appreciate the latter as that gave SO an income for many years.

Home cooking dinner and eating together as a family is the best way to go IMHO, although it's not always possible in today's world.
I remember sitting on the front steps with my friends and come three o'clock in the afternoon, the moaning would start. "I am going to have to go in and start supper pretty soon. I have no idea what I am going to make." (During the stay-at-home Moms era.) I gave up trying to figure out why they hated it so much. I loved cooking. Had ever since as a child. But when I became a single mother, I chose to go to work and only received the kids SS checks from their father's account. Then by the time Poo came along, I found myself in the same situation again. I would rush home after work to make sure I got a hot meal on the table for him. The older kids were out of the home and on their own. Now shopping and buying became a chore. Never enough money, never enough time for grocery shopping. It wasn't until he was safely married that I felt that struggle lift. I now had only myself to care for. Or so I thought. My youngest daughter had five children and was always in need of a care package of groceries. And she was working plus receiving support from the father. So I was still shopping for a full size family plus myself.

It just seemed that struggling to buy groceries has always been a never ending battle. But finally, FINALLY, do you hear me? I shop and feed only myself. And sometimes I make something special for the kids. But I don't think it has ever been a burden.
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Old 09-05-2014, 09:24 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I remember sitting on the front steps with my friends and come three o'clock in the afternoon, the moaning would start. "I am going to have to go in and start supper pretty soon. I have no idea what I am going to make."
After my parents sold their businesses, my mom returned to work 9-5 as a nurse. She worked for a couple of surgeons in a clinic and had to be on call a couple of nights a week. We lived about 5 minutes out-of-town in a mini-subdivision (there were 20 houses on 1 acre lots). Despite having a 7-meal rotation schedule, she'd get home around 5:15, walk to the fridge, open it, and exclaim "I have no idea what we are having for supper tonight!" That image is firmly engrained in my mind. When I talk to her on the phone (if it is before 4:00 p.m.), despite the fact she no longer is in charge of meal preparation, planning, or grocery shopping, she still says that. In her more lucid moments, she has confided that she is so glad she no longer has to cook, she hated it. In even more lucid moments when I'm there, she will select the recipe she wants me to make. It is something I try to do--engage her in the meal planning and get her to make the salad (with coaching and lots of help). I also get her to set the table. Our roles have been reversed. As an 8-yr. old child, I had to make the salad and set the table (to this day, I have to think about on which side the forks go being a lefty). And, making lettuce salad is my least favourite activity in the kitchen.
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Old 09-06-2014, 12:19 AM   #30
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Here's an interesting rebuttal to that article: 'Slate' Criticizes the 'Home-Cooked Family Dinner': Joel Salatin Responds - Real Food - MOTHER EARTH NEWS
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