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Old 01-11-2009, 11:27 PM   #71
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Read about lead and formaldehyde in clothing and the range of symptoms and then tell me that the risk of cancer and rashes etc, is small for children, Pancho.
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Old 01-11-2009, 11:31 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by PieSusan View Post
One needs to deal with both new and used garments from China.
I agree, but I don't think this law is really about doing that. That is the point I am making. We are saying no more can come here, we are saying if you can't prove those used clothes are safe you can't sell them, but where are we saying that if you can't prove those new clothes you are selling right now are safe you can't sell them?

Right now retailers don't have to yank products unless the manufacturer tells ask to do so or they are ordered to do so. Same with thrift stores. Same with importers.
After the law, nothing changes for retailers. Thrift stores must now prove it is safe before being allowed to sell it, and importers must now prove it is safe before being allowed to import and sell it.
So what of all the potentially unsafe products currently in the hands of the retailers? Again, seems to me that if this is so dangerous, then why not yank and burn em like Pancho said? Why leave them on the shelves? Where is the mass recall to protect the kids?
Am I missing that part of it?
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Old 01-11-2009, 11:33 PM   #73
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lead poisoning in children is serious:
Lead poisoning - MayoClinic.com

formaldehyde risk:
Formaldehyde and Cancer: Questions and Answers - National Cancer Institute
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Old 01-11-2009, 11:36 PM   #74
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I agree that lead poisoning and formaldehyde is very serious.

I am also glad we are able to discuss this without the politics getting out of control, hard to do since it is centered around a law which is inherently political by nature. I hope it continues this way, a very good and healthy debate, IMHO.

But I am going to just watch for awhile so others will be encouraged to post their opinions as well...
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Old 01-11-2009, 11:53 PM   #75
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Mav, I could care less about the politics of the issue. I am more concerned about learning that more and more products imported from China are dangerous in one way or another to our health. Melanine anyone? formaldehyde? pesticides? dyes? lead poisoning? plastic? I see this as a health and safety issue. Check the dates of the articles, do your own searches--this is not a new problem. We are just waking up and beginning to do something about it.
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Old 01-12-2009, 12:03 AM   #76
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Mav, I could care less about the politics of the issue. I am more concerned about learning that more and more products imported from China are dangerous in one way or another to our health. Melanine anyone? formaldehyde? pesticides? dyes? lead poisoning? plastic? I see this as a health and safety issue. Check the dates of the articles, do your own searches--this is not a new problem. We are just waking up and beginning to do something about it.
I know it is not new. I know it is dangerous. I know it is serious. I know kids are getting sick or dying. What I don't know is why we are not pulling this stuff on the shelves NOW?!?!?!
We are stopping anything from coming here in the future, we are preventing anything that came here in the past from being resold. But we are doing NOTHING about what is already here, already on our shelves, still being sold to consumers, still not being tested.
How is that safe? How is that protecting us? Cause right now my choices within my budget are: Made in China at Target couldn't tell ya if it is dangerous or not; Or, GoodWill to purchase clothing for less money that is not made in China and therefore not suspect.
Which would you choose?
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Old 01-12-2009, 12:04 AM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PieSusan View Post
Mav, I could care less about the politics of the issue. I am more concerned about learning that more and more products imported from China are dangerous in one way or another to our health. Melanine anyone? formaldehyde? pesticides? dyes? lead poisoning? plastic? I see this as a health and safety issue. Check the dates of the articles, do your own searches--this is not a new problem. We are just waking up and beginning to do something about it.
I wasn't speaking to you directly on that...just making a comment in general.
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Old 01-12-2009, 12:12 AM   #78
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Read about lead and formaldehyde in clothing and the range of symptoms and then tell me that the risk of cancer and rashes etc, is small for children, Pancho.
what I meant was the % of risk is small.in the sense of the % of tainted children's clothes to all existing children's clothes .. if the risk was really great all made in china clothes would be recalled.

This does not do much to get rid of the clothing people will still sell/trade it outside of the stores.

This is one more case of the US consumer getting passed the buck by China. The companies responsible for importing/producing the tainted items should be penalized and have to foot the bill for the testing not American Charities and struggling families.
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Old 01-12-2009, 12:18 AM   #79
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I wanted to say something about the fact that people don't seem to be concerned about their children's safety as long as they can save money.

General observation:

People don't consern themselves with anything that does not benefit them. If something makes things more convenient, saves or makes money there is nothing wrong with it. Cant be. Nope. Nya nyanyanya ...

People, when one on one, are pretty cool. There are very few people who can't understand simple concepts. However when in heard they aren't that bright.

I went looking for lead testing kits, short search, the ones I found are aimed at the home owner, not someone doing multiple samples and assays. It would be labor intensive but probably not that expensive.

Of course there is a simple sollution. Sell no lead replacements, thread and needles at the front register. I know, it's awful of me to expect someone to learn some 8'th grade home Ec.

Next thing you know I'll want these people to quit poisoning their charges with industrial food.

What gets me is, HOW DID LEAD GET INTO THIS COUNTRY IN THE FIRST PLACE? I've go to garage sales and auctions looking for the ever elusive lead pipe dope, and powdered lead for machine building .... It's a fanticy. Mentioning this stuff in a store gets you looked at funy.

I would like to say we've been too lax with regulation with items made in china. We chould make a tarrif on stuff from China to help pay for inspection, monitoring and the replacement of the buttons.

OTOH we in the west have been sending our toxic garbage to China for at least a decade, they use their children to scrap out the 'garbage' and all sorts of nastiness is in their air , food and water. And the Chinese children ingest it.
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Old 01-12-2009, 01:26 PM   #80
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Sorry guys, but I think Pie Susan came closer than anyone to fully understanding the situation. Let me try one more time, then I'm putting this to bed as far as I'm concerned.

The testing is being done on retail shelves now from what I understand. The retailers can afford to do this, the thrift shops can't and won't.

The clothes coming in from China are being TESTED BEFORE they reach the retail stores therefore they will be safe to buy. If they're on the shelves in the next few months they're safe.

Since the clothing in thrift shops was purchased several months or even years ago, they may contain lead.

The reason we don't find lead filled products on our shelves here in America is that lead is OUTLAWED , just like DDT is outlawed here but not in the veggies and fruits coming in from other countries, which by the way is another subject about poisoning.

The clothing itself is not leaching lead, and it can't be washed out even it was. It is the buttons, fasteners, zippers, buckles, etc. made of metal. Metal contains lead. Natural fabrics such as cotton, or wool do not. The child that died was chewing on a button not the clothing itself.

Since adults don't generally chew on their buttons, buckles, etc. this law is aimed at children's clothing. No one can control what a child will put into his mouth.

WE ARE NOT BANNING CLOTHES FROM CHINA WE ARE TESTING THEM AS THEY ARRIVE HERE. THE CHINESE HAVE NO LAWS GOVERNING THE USE OF LEAD, AS WE HAVE SEEN OVER AND OVER IN THE TOYS, ETC. THAT HAVE BEEN PULLED OFF THE RETAIL SHELVES IN THE PAST FEW MONTHS. (I'm not yelling, I just want to draw attention to that fact.)

The thrift shops are upset about this law because so much of the clothing sold in thrift shops is children's clothing. To pull these items off the racks will diminish thier revenue. It will save lives but nobody seems to give a darn about that. Unlike Suze Orman's saying "People first, then money," the thrift shop owners and consumers alike seem to want to put money first.

I don't shop at thrift shops but as I've said I do understand that many people do. And honestly I do respect the fact that many of you are strapped for cash in this wacky economy. And as a mother, I do understand that kids outgrow clothes in a very short time so buying used clothing is a plus in your case. Just don't buy children's clothing and don't chew on any of your buttons until it's safe to do so.

Is it too much to ask that we protect our kids? Give your arguments against this law to the woman whose child died and to the many others who have gotten lead poisoning. This was not just one case, it was just one case too many. And thank God it didn't happen to your child. Will you still be willing to take that chance?

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