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Old 12-26-2010, 11:00 PM   #11
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Sault Sainte-Marie translates from French as "the Rapids of Saint Mary". I got this from the Wikepedia website entry.

I got this from the free dictionary site: Obsolete French, from Old French, leap, waterfall; see somersault.]
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Old 12-26-2010, 11:44 PM   #12
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Joes, I am so impressed. I must have missed it on Wiki, and my larousse wasn't helping, but it makes sense now!
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Old 12-26-2010, 11:55 PM   #13
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OK, here's one. Des Moines. The nearest I've come up with is "of the monks"? Anyone know something about it?
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Old 12-27-2010, 12:49 AM   #14
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From Wiki:

Origin of name
Des Moines takes its name from Fort Des Moines (1843–1846), which was named for the Des Moines River. The French "des Moines" (pronounced [demwan] ( listen)) translates literally to either "monks" or "of the monks".
The historian Virgil Vogel documented changes in the name of the Des Moines River over time, and determined that "Des Moines" ultimately derived from "Moingona", the name for a group of Illinois who lived along the Des Moines River, and that the name was gradually changed by French traders and mapmakers to "Des Moines", probably because it was easier to transcribe. Vogel felt "Moingona" was derived from the Algonquan clan name "Loon".[9]
Other historians and linguistic researchers concluded that Moingona meant "people by the portage" or something similar, a reference to the Des Moines Rapids, where the earliest meetings between the Moingona and European explorers took place.[10]
One popular interpretation of "Des Moines" ignores Vogel's research, and concludes that "Des Moines" refers to French Trappist monks, who lived in huts on top of what is now known as Monks Mound near St. Louis some 200 miles (320 km) from the Des Moines River.[11]
A controversial recent hypothesis using a study of Miami-Illinois tribal names concludes the word Moingona comes from mooyiinkweena, a derogatory name which translates roughly to "the excrement-faces." The name was apparently given to Marquette and Joliet by a tribal leader to dissuade them from doing business with a neighboring tribe.[12] But the deviser of this hypothesis admits it is improbable ("strange" as he puts it). This alternative etymology is rejected by the amateur historian Jim Fay, who feels the interpretation of Moingona as "excrement face" is refuted by a large body of first-hand accounts and detailed ethnolinguistic research.[10]
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Old 12-27-2010, 12:57 AM   #15
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This one I have to tell my husband, he'll love it. Yes, I could wiki anything, but it's more fun this way!
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Old 12-27-2010, 01:05 AM   #16
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This one I have to tell my husband, he'll love it. Yes, I could wiki anything, but it's more fun this way!
I usually Wiki anything I want to know about, then I go from there if I need to research further. I have 4 foriegn language dictionaries in the house (don't ask me where they are) I have a French to English, Spanish to English/English to Spanish, an English to Esperanto and an English to Tagalog. My severly antiquated Encyclopedias were given to my nephews when I got my first internet connection

If it's not in my head I have to research!
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Old 12-28-2010, 07:25 AM   #17
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Esperanto? ESPERANTO?!! You have to be kidding me! And you have some of it in your head? Once, out of the blue, I cannot remember when, if it was in the military (I think it might have been when I was in basic), I was tested in this, and passed with flying colors. Hun? Isn't this a make-believe language? But I, too, used to have a lot of dictionaries. Nowadays it's so unecessary since you can do it all on line, but I won't give up my trusty Larousse. I bought my Mom one years ago, but she's still inclined to call me (heck, it's really just an excuse to talk) if there's something in French she wants to know. Stupid because French is my father's first language, but sometimes she wants me to explain it. I have a friend whose daughter lives in France, and she'll ask me. So the Larousse is easier and faster than going on-line. But when it comes to regional stuff, forget it. If you don't live there, you won't get it. When we were on the road, we ran into Quebecoise trying to speak to Cajuns in Louisiana. In fact, I think both factions were just being stubborn!
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Old 12-28-2010, 11:05 AM   #18
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Ok, it is not a place but we have a lot of it here in Minnesota. Ok it is not "it" it is they, the Geese, Canada Geese that is. A lot of times you heare people calling them Canadian (mind out friends from Canada here) geese, well, they are not. They are named after a person who's last name was CAnada.
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Old 12-28-2010, 11:08 AM   #19
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LOL! I got an interest in Esperanto, simply because it was used in Science-Fiction stories. I can parse some of it, since it is closely related to Spanish and I talian, I never did learn much beyond what I was reading in the books.

I forgot, I have Na'vi (from Avatar) dictionaries on my computer. My Dad is the culprit for love of languages. He speaks Korean, Mandarin, another Chinese dialect, Japanese and he is currently learning Na'vi.
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Old 12-28-2010, 12:01 PM   #20
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OK, here's one. Des Moines. The nearest I've come up with is "of the monks"? Anyone know something about it?
It's the home of the Iowa Girls Basketball State Championship!!

jennyema captain CRW '75!!
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