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Old 08-27-2012, 03:32 PM   #61
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I enjoy our local oysters fried, but they're a pain to open. Sea urchins used to be popular and not too expensive in Italy. I've had some Russian caviar that was quite tasty at a party but could not eat as much as I wanted without offending the host.
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Old 08-27-2012, 03:58 PM   #62
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Funny, to each their own.

I love caviar, sea urchin and oysters. Too bad the first two are so pricey I can't indulge often (or in the case of sea urchin, the quantity I would like).

Oysters are like ambrosia to me, especially the cold bay west coast varieties around here (kumomato, Penn Cove, etc etc etc). I like them just about any way, but nothing is better on the half shell. And NOT with hot sauce. At most a squeeze of lemon or a mignonette. Fresh, briney, absolutely essence of the sea.
+1 on the half-shell is my favorite with a squeeze of fresh lemon.
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Old 08-27-2012, 04:04 PM   #63
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I enjoy our local oysters fried, but they're a pain to open. Sea urchins used to be popular and not too expensive in Italy. I've had some Russian caviar that was quite tasty at a party but could not eat as much as I wanted without offending the host.
I have a caviar story. My wife is an oncology nurse. One of her nurse friends used to sojourn to Kazakhstan every year to work with cancer kids. She was like a celebrity there. The local officials always gave her gifts. A couple she passed on to us. A local high-end vodka and a half kilo tin of Osetra caviar. Wife and I made all the accompaniments and sat down and ate about $1200 worth of caviar in one sitting.
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Old 08-27-2012, 04:41 PM   #64
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I have a caviar story. My wife is an oncology nurse. One of her nurse friends used to sojourn to Kazakhstan every year to work with cancer kids. She was like a celebrity there. The local officials always gave her gifts. A couple she passed on to us. A local high-end vodka and a half kilo tin of Osetra caviar. Wife and I made all the accompaniments and sat down and ate about $1200 worth of caviar in one sitting.
To fully appreciate that quantity of caviar I'd prefer a few bottles of Moet to clear the palate.
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Old 08-27-2012, 04:46 PM   #65
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I have a caviar story too.

Back in the late 70s, I worked with a friend who was a straight arrow and had very simple tastes to say the least. He often boasted, "If it doesn't moo, I don't want to eat it." Not culinarilly adventurous or even curious.

We worked at a very small but fast growing company. People were coming on board so fast no one knew their co-workers very well. The president decided to have a cocktail hour after work so folks could get acquainted with each other. We all walked into a fabulous spread of great foods, including caviar, to enjoy with our drinks.

As my friend related to me later, he was a little put off by all the foods he didn't recognize or refused to eat until his hungry eyes spotted the "blackberry jam". He loaded up on it and some crackers and went off to a corner to the biggest surprise of his life!
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Old 08-27-2012, 05:07 PM   #66
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To fully appreciate that quantity of caviar I'd prefer a few bottles of Moet to clear the palate.

We had champagne. Not Moet, but don't recall the brand.

We also had the vodka.
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Old 08-27-2012, 05:08 PM   #67
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I have a caviar story too.

Back in the late 70s, I worked with a friend who was a straight arrow and had very simple tastes to say the least. He often boasted, "If it doesn't moo, I don't want to eat it." Not culinarilly adventurous or even curious.

We worked at a very small but fast growing company. People were coming on board so fast no one knew their co-workers very well. The president decided to have a cocktail hour after work so folks could get acquainted with each other. We all walked into a fabulous spread of great foods, including caviar, to enjoy with our drinks.

As my friend related to me later, he was a little put off by all the foods he didn't recognize or refused to eat until his hungry eyes spotted the "blackberry jam". He loaded up on it and some crackers and went off to a corner to the biggest surprise of his life!
Hilarious.
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Old 08-27-2012, 06:57 PM   #68
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Originally Posted by qmax

Oysters are like ambrosia to me, especially the cold bay west coast varieties around here (kumomato, Penn Cove, etc etc etc). I like them just about any way, but nothing is better on the half shell. And NOT with hot sauce. At most a squeeze of lemon or a mignonette. Fresh, briney, absolutely essence of the sea.
I eat raw oysters with a tiny bit each of lemon and hot sauce but not enough to overpower the oyster, I think.

I'm re thinking this.

Newbie question:
What is a mignonette?



Mignonette?
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Old 08-27-2012, 07:08 PM   #69
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I eat raw oysters with a tiny bit each of lemon and hot sauce but not enough to overpower the oyster, I think.

I'm re thinking this.

Newbie question:
What is a mignonette?



Mignonette?

Sort of a classic sauce to drizzle on an oyster. Most simply, a high quality vinegar (sherry, red wine, et al) with minced shallot.

Really works well. Adds a bit of acidity.
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Old 08-27-2012, 07:09 PM   #70
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I have a caviar story. My wife is an oncology nurse. One of her nurse friends used to sojourn to Kazakhstan every year to work with cancer kids. She was like a celebrity there. The local officials always gave her gifts. A couple she passed on to us. A local high-end vodka and a half kilo tin of Osetra caviar. Wife and I made all the accompaniments and sat down and ate about $1200 worth of caviar in one sitting.
I've only had caviar once when I was in my early teens. I'm 53 now and the memory of it and these caviar posts has me salivating.

Caviar is a bit above my pay grade or maybe I've had other priorities but just the mention of it makes me think that I might be due for a treat.

I enjoy vodka but what other accompaniments are you referring to?

Also, how do I choose a decent caviar without breaking the bank?
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