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Old 01-12-2012, 09:55 PM   #1311
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Originally Posted by buckytom
isn't that a steak sauce???
Close.
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Old 01-12-2012, 09:57 PM   #1312
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
I just checked my A1C, using the Bayer A1C Selfcheck and.....it is 6.9!!!
This is down from 8.6, one month ago!!!

I'm just a little excited about this.
Congratulations. That is great. I didn't know Bayer had a A1c check. I usually wait for the blood work every three months. Mine runs between 6.0 and 6.3. If I can stay out of the hospital, it will stay there.
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Old 01-12-2012, 10:14 PM   #1313
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
What is A1C? What is the normal range?
It's a hemoglobin test that can determine your blood sugar control for the past 3 months, with the 3rd month counting for 50%. The normal or recommended goal for Diabetics is <7...<6 is even better.
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Old 01-12-2012, 10:17 PM   #1314
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Congratulations. That is great. I didn't know Bayer had a A1c check. I usually wait for the blood work every three months. Mine runs between 6.0 and 6.3. If I can stay out of the hospital, it will stay there.
A1CNow - Giving Real Time A1C Results

I picked it up at Walmart, $23 for 2 tests. Uses a drop of blood about twice what you need for a fingerstick.
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Old 01-12-2012, 10:20 PM   #1315
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
What is A1C? What is the normal range?
6.0 is normal for non-diabetics. An A1c is the blood test that tells your doc what your sugar readings (even without a meter reading) have been for the past three months. An 8.6 is extremely high and reason for concern. 6.3 - 6.9 is reasonable but requires watching.

There is a regimen that diabetics are supposed to follow. You are supposed to take a meter reading before and after breakfast. Then depending on what your doctor wants you to do, at least two to three more readings during the day.

Being me, of course I don't do it that way. I know my body, and know right away if my sugar is climbing. And like all diabetics can tell instantly if we are crashing. If the sugar goes too high, we can slip into a coma. If it crashes, then we can have a seizure. So if I am having a good week, I may not test my sugar at all. Or if I am having a bad day, I may check it several times until I get a reading I like. It i a toss up as to which is worse. Crashing or climbing too high. If you are crashing, you feel shaky inside, then shakey all over, start to sweat, breath with shallow breaths, get very weak. That person needs to get sugar into them right away. Or:

Like me right now. I checked my sugar. Not feeling good. Meter is reading 219. WAY TO HIGH. I will take a glipazide. Insulin in pill form. For those on the needle, they need to get a shot of insulin into them to get it down. A reading of 90 - 110 is normal.

This all becomes a way of life. With insulin and diet, diabetes can be successfully managed.

More info than you need or want?
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Old 01-12-2012, 10:34 PM   #1316
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
6.0 is normal for non-diabetics. An A1c is the blood test that tells your doc what your sugar readings (even without a meter reading) have been for the past three months. An 8.6 is extremely high and reason for concern. 6.3 - 6.9 is reasonable but requires watching.

There is a regimen that diabetics are supposed to follow. You are supposed to take a meter reading before and after breakfast. Then depending on what your doctor wants you to do, at least two to three more readings during the day.

Being me, of course I don't do it that way. I know my body, and know right away if my sugar is climbing. And like all diabetics can tell instantly if we are crashing. If the sugar goes too high, we can slip into a coma. If it crashes, then we can have a seizure. So if I am having a good week, I may not test my sugar at all. Or if I am having a bad day, I may check it several times until I get a reading I like. It i a toss up as to which is worse. Crashing or climbing too high. If you are crashing, you feel shaky inside, then shakey all over, start to sweat, breath with shallow breaths, get very weak. That person needs to get sugar into them right away. Or:

Like me right now. I checked my sugar. Not feeling good. Meter is reading 219. WAY TO HIGH. I will take a glipazide. Insulin in pill form. For those on the needle, they need to get a shot of insulin into them to get it down. A reading of 90 - 110 is normal.

This all becomes a way of life. With insulin and diet, diabetes can be successfully managed.

More info than you need or want?
Interesting. I have a strong family history of diabetes, just don't know much about it, now 2 of my siblings have it, i need to get better on watching what I eat & get back to exercising.
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Old 01-12-2012, 11:05 PM   #1317
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Interesting. I have a strong family history of diabetes, just don't know much about it, now 2 of my siblings have it, i need to get better on watching what I eat & get back to exercising.
Your doctor needs to know; let me refrain that. MUST know about the diabetes in your family. He will be more diligent in testing you. Make sure you tell him or her. Family history and overweight are two of the main causes of diabetes.

In my family, diabetes and heart and/or heart related diseases are our family choices. I am the last person in my family that is still alive. All my aunts, uncles, cousins, etc are dead from one or the other or both. And now there is already one of the next generaton with heart disease. His heart was damaged from measles when he was seven y.o. He has had eight heart attacks. My son #1. And with his weight, he will be the next to have diabetes. Then my daughter. She already has vascular disease in her legs. And it wouldn't hurt her to lose about thirty pounds. Fortunately my kids are smart enough to not be in denial and have informed their doctors of the family history. It is so IMPORTANT that your doctor know. I can't emphasize this strongly enough.
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Old 01-12-2012, 11:40 PM   #1318
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Red face Dirty Little Secret

For those of you who live in the states, there is a dirty little secret that a lot of folks are not aware of. Your primary doctor may be a partner of a medical practice. The more tests that are ordered by your doctor, the less profit for the 'group.' And when they have their monthly meetings to see who brought in the most Medicare, insurance and cash payment dollars as profit, that doctor gets a bonus. For the poor schmuck who brought in the least he/she is berated in front of their colleagues. That doctor has to have a dang good reason why so many tests were ordered. And that doctor gets the least amount of the profits. So when your doctor fails to order tests, there is a dirty little secret behind it.

Is this legal? Sure is! You see, Medicare, insurance companies and health plans like Medex never pay the full amount that is billed. Specially if it is an expensive test. They make more money by having you come back time and time again just to look at you, take your vitals and send you on your way. And sometimes insurance companies have the doctor call and get approval for tests. He doesn't have the time for that foolishness. After all he is the doctor. Can't be bothered. And try to get him to fill out paper work for handicapped. That's what secretaries are for. But he still has to sign it. To time consuming. He doesn't make money doing that. He would rather have you make a trip to the office, and then he can charge for a visit while he is scribbling his name. He doesn't even bother to read what the secretary typed up for the reason you are handicapped.

You have to be your own medical advocate and ask questions. You have the right to read your medical reports and charts. You have the right to ask for and have tests ordered if you suspect something is wrong. You have the right to question his treatment of your complaint. And you have the right to pain medication if you are in pain. If you tell him that your ingrown toe nail hurts, then it hurts. It is not for him to question it, but to treat it.

Just thought you might like to know. Anyone have anything they would like to add?
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Old 01-13-2012, 10:01 AM   #1319
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For those of you who live in the states, there is a dirty little secret that a lot of folks are not aware of. Your primary doctor may be a partner of a medical practice.
The medical ripoffs and scams that are played each and every day by Medical Doctors in the USA and the insurance companies are too numerous to even tackle. I got very, very lucky when I found my Doctor here in St. Augustine. He plays no games, He's as honest as the day is long and he allows no billing gimicks by his staff. He TRIES to make my bill as small as possible. He just discussed with me, the use of the Counties "Primary Care" system. He told me that by ordering my tests through them, I could save a lot of money.

At this time, I have no medical insurance. Frankly, I don't want any except for some that would cover me in the event of hospitalization. Too many games are involved with the medical insurance system in the USA. I want no part of the games.
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Old 01-13-2012, 01:33 PM   #1320
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The medical ripoffs and scams that are played each and every day by Medical Doctors in the USA and the insurance companies are too numerous to even tackle. I got very, very lucky when I found my Doctor here in St. Augustine. He plays no games, He's as honest as the day is long and he allows no billing gimicks by his staff. He TRIES to make my bill as small as possible. He just discussed with me, the use of the Counties "Primary Care" system. He told me that by ordering my tests through them, I could save a lot of money.

At this time, I have no medical insurance. Frankly, I don't want any except for some that would cover me in the event of hospitalization. Too many games are involved with the medical insurance system in the USA. I want no part of the games.
Tim, I know you are retired. If you retired due to disability, then you are elegible for Medicare Disability. That covers your hospitalization, if necessary. You will receive full benefits as if you retired at 65 or older.
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