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Old 05-04-2016, 08:35 PM   #11
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In my nearly 60 years of cooking, I have yet to conquer biscuits. I bet I have tried every recipe and technique in the universe. Thank my lucky stars I had willing "testers" who didn't mind eating my failures...as long as there was plenty of real butter and the flops were still warm.
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Old 05-04-2016, 09:20 PM   #12
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Pound cake made with all whole wheat pastry flour. Once ChefJune told me it couldn't be done and why, I gave up trying.
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Old 05-05-2016, 07:05 AM   #13
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Vegetarian Hot and Sour soup that tastes exactly like the place I get it from.
Ive been trying for literally decades. Partially, just by trying to figure it out myself and partially by trying different recipes from books, searching online and here.

When I make it , it tastes like Im trying to make Hot and Sour soup, but its just not the same.

The hard ingredients are easy, I can see the mushrooms ( different varieties), the julienned carrots, bamboo shoots and snow peas, the lilly buds. All this is obvious. Its the broth that I just can't get.

At first I thought, maybe they are using a " non-vegetarian ' broth, and just saying its a vegetarian dish because there is no actual meats in it. But, I've had it in vegan restaurants as well, and some tasted just as good as the regular place I get it from.

Luckily, the place hasn't gone out of business yet, so I can still get my hands on it. Although, I'd really like to be able to come closer than I already have.

My refrigerator is stocked with just about every Asian sauce, condiment, ingredient that I've collected, over time, trying to make it taste like the restaurants version.

Larry
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Old 05-05-2016, 07:34 AM   #14
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Larry, if you feel that the broth may be the problem, keep in mind that Better Than Bullion also makes one for vegetarians. When I make clam chowder, I use their BTB for clams.
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Old 07-19-2016, 11:15 PM   #15
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(Curry Chicken Noodle Soup from Malay Satay Hut in Redmond, but I've already written about that here.)

The mountain I'm currently trying to climb is pizza dough from home-milled flour. The inspiration came from this recent NY Times review, and I'm struggling. I quickly realized that I can't use set recipes, or even any equipment (until I get it right), because I need to feel the dough forming and adjust hydration to this particular grind of flour. I could get a fine-mesh screen and sift out most of the sharp, bubble-killing bran, but for now I consider that cheating.

Has anyone had success using home-milled flour?
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Old 07-20-2016, 05:28 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by outRIAAge View Post
(Curry Chicken Noodle Soup from Malay Satay Hut in Redmond, but I've already written about that here.)

The mountain I'm currently trying to climb is pizza dough from home-milled flour. The inspiration came from this recent NY Times review, and I'm struggling. I quickly realized that I can't use set recipes, or even any equipment (until I get it right), because I need to feel the dough forming and adjust hydration to this particular grind of flour. I could get a fine-mesh screen and sift out most of the sharp, bubble-killing bran, but for now I consider that cheating.

Has anyone had success using home-milled flour?
Two thoughts.

Put your coarse flour into a food processor and whirl it to reduce the size of the bran bits, make a finer flour.

or

Make a poolish or wet dough and put it into the refrigerator for a day so to fully hydrate the bran bits then complete the dough mixture with the last cup or so of flour.

Good luck!
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Old 07-20-2016, 02:49 PM   #17
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Stir-fry. I don't believe it can be done properly with electric burners or most home gas stoves. They simply can't give the BTUs required. When it cools down (maybe January or February) I'll give it a whirl on the propane burner I use for crawfish boils.
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Old 07-20-2016, 03:36 PM   #18
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Quote:
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Put your coarse flour into a food processor and whirl it to reduce the size of the bran bits, make a finer flour.
or
Make a poolish or wet dough and put it into the refrigerator for a day so to fully hydrate the bran bits then complete the dough mixture with the last cup or so of flour. Good luck!
Those are both excellent ideas: thank you. Your wording took me right back to the 1960s Homepride adverts, where "graded grains make finer flour."

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Old 07-20-2016, 05:10 PM   #19
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Stir-fry. I don't believe it can be done properly with electric burners or most home gas stoves. They simply can't give the BTUs required.
Sorry, CraigC, but I think that's just silly. I don't need for my stir fries to taste like they came from a Chinese restaurant to enjoy them. I use authentic Asian ingredients, like these, and get great flavor.
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Old 07-20-2016, 05:13 PM   #20
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Sorry, CraigC, but I think that's just silly. I don't need for my stir fries to taste like they came from a Chinese restaurant to enjoy them. I use authentic Asian ingredients, like these, and get great flavor.
Never mind I thought this was in the "what do I do with leftover rotisserie chicken" thread. If it's that important to you, go for it.
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