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Old 10-15-2016, 02:49 PM   #14591
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This storm is picking up the remnant of Songda (sp?), a typhoon, the eastern equivalent of a hurricane. So, maybe no hurricane per se, but still with a remnant of one and packing some low level hurricane winds.

I've seen 2" of rain - I can't imagine 10" in that short a time. WOW!

Anyway, I have a ringside seat. I'm one of the few here who doesn't have to worry about flooding or falling trees. We'll even still have water if the power goes out. All that makes me very lucky compared to others.
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Old 10-15-2016, 03:08 PM   #14592
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We certainly call them hurricanes in Canada, when they hit Newfoundland or the Atlantic Provinces. They may technically be "extratropical cyclones" with hurricane force winds. But that is just terminology.
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Old 10-15-2016, 03:08 PM   #14593
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
This storm is picking up the remnant of Songda (sp?), a typhoon, the eastern equivalent of a hurricane. So, maybe no hurricane per se, but still with a remnant of one and packing some low level hurricane winds.

I've seen 2" of rain - I can't imagine 10" in that short a time. WOW!

Anyway, I have a ringside seat. I'm one of the few here who doesn't have to worry about flooding or falling trees. We'll even still have water if the power goes out. All that makes me very lucky compared to others.
Stay safe.
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Old 10-15-2016, 04:16 PM   #14594
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
We certainly call them hurricanes in Canada, when they hit Newfoundland or the Atlantic Provinces. They may technically be "extratropical cyclones" with hurricane force winds. But that is just terminology.
It's not just terminology according to DH the teacher. Words matter.
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Old 10-15-2016, 04:41 PM   #14595
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It's not just terminology according to DH the teacher. Words matter.
And they are used differently in different places.

Actually, does it matter that technically they don't have hurricanes on the west side of the Pacific? Typhoons behave exactly like hurricanes. To call something an extratropical cyclone actually gives the impression of something milder than a hurricane. It includes weather that isn't hurricane-like. The difference between what Canadians call a hurricane in Canada and what others might call an extratropical cyclone is latitude, a human defined set of imaginary lines on the Earth.
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Old 10-15-2016, 05:16 PM   #14596
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And they are used differently in different places.

Actually, does it matter that technically they don't have hurricanes on the west side of the Pacific? Typhoons behave exactly like hurricanes. To call something an extratropical cyclone actually gives the impression of something milder than a hurricane. It includes weather that isn't hurricane-like. The difference between what Canadians call a hurricane in Canada and what others might call an extratropical cyclone is latitude, a human defined set of imaginary lines on the Earth.
Of course it matters, just like the difference between the words simmer, boil and steam matters. They're all methods of cooking with moisture, but they don't describe the same thing.

The definition of a hurricane includes where the originates and where it gets its energy - which is from the warm waters of the tropics. This is from DH: Once a hurricane goes up the coast, it's no longer fueled by warm water. It changes and mixes with other air masses and is no longer a hurricane, but more like a nor'easter. It can still be a s**t-kicking storm, but it's not a hurricane.

Anything with the word cyclone or typhoon in it certainly should give the impression of a dangerous storm. If it doesn't, well, lots of people use words without knowing what they mean.
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Old 10-15-2016, 05:35 PM   #14597
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Of course it matters, just like the difference between the words simmer, boil and steam matters. They're all methods of cooking with moisture, but they don't describe the same thing.

The definition of a hurricane includes where the originates and where it gets its energy - which is from the warm waters of the tropics. This is from DH: Once a hurricane goes up the coast, it's no longer fueled by warm water. It changes and mixes with other air masses and is no longer a hurricane, but more like a nor'easter. It can still be a s**t-kicking storm, but it's not a hurricane.

Anything with the word cyclone or typhoon in it certainly should give the impression of a dangerous storm. If it doesn't, well, lots of people use words without knowing what they mean.
From Wikipedia, "Extratropical cyclones can bring mild weather with a little rain and surface winds of 1530 km/h (9.318.6 mph), or they can be cold and dangerous with torrential rain and winds exceeding 119 km/h (74 mph) ..." That's why I wrote that it could imply that it was milder than a hurricane.

I see that there are other differences than just latitude between extratropical cyclones and hurricanes. If I understand correctly, it has to do with getting its energy from warm air and water or cold and whether there is high or low pressure at the centre. Probably oversimplifying there. It seems that the hurricanes that hit Newfoundland often hit as hurricanes and then transition into extratropical cyclones over land.

I still don't see any significant difference between the terms, "tropical cyclone", "hurricane", and "typhoon".
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Old 10-15-2016, 05:43 PM   #14598
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I still don't see any significant difference between the terms, "tropical cyclone", "hurricane", and "typhoon".
I'm not an Earth science teacher, so I'm not going to get into this further. If you want to research it, though, I would suggest an Earth science resource like the USGS rather than Wikipedia.
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Old 10-15-2016, 06:14 PM   #14599
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I'm not an Earth science teacher, so I'm not going to get into this further. If you want to research it, though, I would suggest an Earth science resource like the USGS rather than Wikipedia.
"The terms "hurricane" and "typhoon" are regionally specific names for a strong "tropical cyclone"." From The National Ocianic & Atmospheric Administration Hurricane Research Division:

TCFAQ A1) What is a hurricane, typhoon, or tropical cyclone?

Wikipedia just had something short that I could quote.
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Old 10-15-2016, 07:38 PM   #14600
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A gust of wind by any other name.......

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...torm-saturday/

Here's a couple of excerpts:

In Oregon, the Weather Service office in Portland has issued a hurricane-force wind watch for the coast and is calling this event the “Ides of October storm.”


The storm’s central pressure is expected to plummet to 965-970 millibars — which is equivalent to many Category 2 hurricanes.


The flag on the building across the street is now waving in the wind. It was still this morning. The clouds are purple in the sky (would you believe we had a bright minute of sun about 30 minutes ago?) and the banner hanging across the street, which no one took down, is now tangled around the power line. This city, I swear.

GG, I meant to say that I don't think the weathermen are hyping this storm, but I think the media certainly is. Again, it could very well be a deadly serious storm, but I think that depends on where you're at in the PNW. Where I'm at now, I'm relatively safe. If I was still living in Belfair, I'd probably be preparing for siege, like one of my friends. She has a wood burning stove, but she'll probably lose power and therefore water for a week or so in this storm, not to mention that they have trees all around their house and property.

The frustrating thing about this is I can't find any current weather updates. I don't have a TV or a radio and everything on the internet is about 6 hours behind. I guess watching the flag is my best bet and if that tears off in the wind, which it's done before, I'm sort of left in the dark.
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