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Old 01-12-2012, 12:10 PM   #51
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Lacing hiking boots can be a PIA. When I put them on I don't expect to be back home for several hours.
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:19 PM   #52
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Do you ever use the Shark steamer to steam wrinkles out of your clothes? If so, how good a job does it do?
I've used it on curtains...I wear dog clothes most of the time...so I don't iron, it worked great on the curtains. However, I use the Shark steamer to clean the shower (works great), the stove, and my favorite, the little grooves in vinyl windows to get all that winter dirt out. And you would not believe how well it works on VariKennels (dog crates). It was worth the money (I am on my 2nd one). It is like having a pressure washer in the house. I've brought that to my mom's in MN to do her windows (I have to say, doing windows with it is probably my favorite use for it). I used it to clean the cabin in 2010. I was done cleaning in about 90 minutes--shower, stove, floors, windows. Down side is that you do have to empty it after you use it and it takes longer to heat up than the Vac-n-Steam if all you want to do is steam the floors.
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:39 PM   #53
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I think they are around $149...
Thanks CWS, I'll be buying one of these! I'm installing ceramic tile throughout the entire house, so it'll get used a lot.
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:51 PM   #54
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Thanks CWS, I'll be buying one of these! I'm installing ceramic tile throughout the entire house, so it'll get used a lot.
It works great on tile and hardwood. You might want to rethink ceramic tile in the kitchen--go with stone or hardwood. If you drop something heavy on a ceramic floor, the tile will crack/break. And, consider ditra mat under the tile.
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:02 PM   #55
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Apologies if this has already been covered in this thread, but there are a lot of shoes on/off posts I chose not to read. Anyway, Mythbusters busted the 5 second rule. Time wasn't an issue when it came to how much bacteria a food product collected. What was the bigger issue was how wet or dry the food product is as to how much it would collect. If the food is dry it can pretty much lay around all day. If the food is wet, probably should pick it up as soon as you can. Although if it takes a little more than 5 seconds, it's not a big deal. I'll generally rinse off something that's wet or has more moisture in it and continue to use it. Something dry, if I don't see anything obvious on it, gets used as is.

From Wikipedia.
Myth statement - The "Five-second rule" is valid when it comes to food dropped on the floor.
Status - Busted
Notes - This myth yielded a varied number of results, but in the definitive test where the only variable was time, the myth was definitively busted. There was no real difference in the number of bacteria collected from 2 seconds exposure as there was from 6 seconds exposure. Instead, the texture and moisture inherent to the food dropped dictate the amount of bacteria collected.
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:23 PM   #56
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It works great on tile and hardwood. You might want to rethink ceramic tile in the kitchen--go with stone or hardwood. If you drop something heavy on a ceramic floor, the tile will crack/break. And, consider ditra mat under the tile.
I may go with laminate, CWS. It depends on if I can find the color I want. The tile I had picked out was off-white with black specs in it. I want to use nice, bright, light color.
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:25 PM   #57
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It works great on tile and hardwood. You might want to rethink ceramic tile in the kitchen--go with stone or hardwood. If you drop something heavy on a ceramic floor, the tile will crack/break. And, consider ditra mat under the tile.
Have to agree about the tile in the kitchen. Son #2 is a floor man. Carpets, wood, tile, etc. He gets paid more money for putting in tile, but always tries to talk the customer out of putting ceeramic tile in the kitchen for the stated reasons. Then it becomes more costly to replace the broken tile. Also, installing ceramic tile is a two day job. First day installing the tile, second day grouting. And if you insist on a total job, third day removing the haze. He advises that you do that yourself. Saves you money. Customers appreciate that. Also, liquids spilled in the kitchen will eventually loosen the grout. That means that the tile has to be lifted, hopefully in one piece without cracking or breaking, new base applied, and then grouted. With any luck, you will be able to find the same shade of grout.

Make sure your installer leaves extra tiles and grout with you so you can fill in any areas that loosen over time. If he over buys, keep at least a half of box. Most tile men don't like to leave any extras. An ethical one will have no problem doing so.

Son #1 is a contractor and says the same thing. And he also leaves any extra paint so that the home owner can touch up any spots over time. Any good contractor will do this. Son #1 always works for the customer, not the bottom line.
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:41 PM   #58
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I would hesitate to use a steamer on a hardwood floor. Water is the enemy of wood. Steam can penetrate the cracks and cause damage/swelling to the wood. Maybe not right away but over time.

I have a ceramic tile floor in both baths and the kitchen. I much prefer it to the laminate (linoleum) floor I had in the kitchen before. The contractor put in a new firm sub-floor and sealed the grout to prevent staining.

Damage can still happen but it's not likely. And in in the mean time, I have a nice water and stain-resitant floor.

JMHO.
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:41 PM   #59
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if, after all of this brouhaha about shoes/not shoes, you still invite me to your home, alix, i will bring along a pair of my indoor shoes, a bottle of good wine, a six-pack of beer and a roomba. we can have a good talk and a laugh about our cultures, and maybe even eat some of your famous lemon bars(?)
Dear lady, I have a roomba, you are always invited, and I'll make us the full meal deal to go along with the wine. We might even get really twisted and go out onto the patio and make everyone twitch coming in and out. Heeheehee. Just let me know when you are coming and I'll make sure to prep some food we'll both like!
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:43 PM   #60
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I may go with laminate, CWS. It depends on if I can find the color I want. The tile I had picked out was off-white with black specs in it. I want to use nice, bright, light color.
The Vac-n-steam works great on laminate. I don't like laminate--I don't like the "clicking" sound of the dogs' nails on it. I put that in the house in the City and am replacing it with hardwood. My old dogs had problems with the laminate--they had a hard time getting up off of it, so I had to put down rubber mats for them. The same was true re: the old dogs of a friend who also had laminate. Hardwood seems to offer more of a grip...But, you have cats, so that would not be a problem. Cork is another option. I've had friends who had cork floors and really liked them. And, the Saints had no problem when they got old re: getting up off the cork floor.
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