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Old 05-23-2014, 06:52 AM   #431
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I am going to be using this one:

thagomizer:
(anatomy) An arrangement of spikes found on the tails of various
stegosaurs.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/thagomizer>
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Old 05-23-2014, 02:04 PM   #432
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
I am going to be using this one:

thagomizer:
(anatomy) An arrangement of spikes found on the tails of various
stegosaurs.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/thagomizer>
But you left out the best part:
Etymology

Coined by Gary Larson in 1982. His comic strip shows a caveman giving a lecture illustrating this part of a dinosaur, with the caption "Now this end is called the thagomizer... after the late Thag Simmons". See -ize, -er.

The term "thagomizer" has been in use for quite a while, as a joke, but it is now the official term.
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Old 05-23-2014, 06:10 PM   #433
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I only put out the information I had...but, I am glad to have learned a Larsonism.
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Old 05-29-2014, 07:50 AM   #434
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apothegm:
A short, witty, instructive saying; an aphorism or maxim.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/apothegm>
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Old 05-29-2014, 01:16 PM   #435
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Quote:
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morpheme:
(linguistics) The smallest linguistic unit within a word that can carry
a meaning, such as "un-", "break", and "-able" in the word
"unbreakable".
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/morpheme>
Actually, a morpheme is the smallest grammatical unit that carries meaning. The example is made up of three morphs and each morph represents one morpheme. There are free morphemes, bound morphemes, derivational morphemes, inflectional morphemes, and even cranberry morphemes. One can't study morphology without having had the difference between a morph and a morpheme pounded into one's head. A morph is a formal unit with a physical shape. A morpheme is an abstract unit of meaning. Now doesn't that distinction make perfect sense?
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Old 05-29-2014, 01:22 PM   #436
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Actually, a morpheme is the smallest grammatical unit that carries meaning. The example is made up of three morphs and each morph represents one morpheme. There are free morphemes, bound morphemes, derivational morphemes, inflectional morphemes, and even cranberry morphemes. One can't study morphology without having had the difference between a morph and a morpheme pounded into one's head. A morph is a formal unit with a physical shape. A morpheme is an abstract unit of meaning. Now doesn't that distinction make perfect sense?
Examples?
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Old 05-29-2014, 04:25 PM   #437
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Yeah, 'splain us more, please?
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Old 05-30-2014, 08:21 AM   #438
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have Van Gogh's ear for music:
(humorous) To be tone-deaf.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/have_..._ear_for_music>
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Old 05-31-2014, 02:10 AM   #439
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boondoggle

work or activity that is wasteful or pointless, but gives the impression of having value.
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Old 05-31-2014, 02:26 AM   #440
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Actually, a morpheme is the smallest grammatical unit that carries meaning. The example is made up of three morphs and each morph represents one morpheme. There are free morphemes, bound morphemes, derivational morphemes, inflectional morphemes, and even cranberry morphemes. One can't study morphology without having had the difference between a morph and a morpheme pounded into one's head. A morph is a formal unit with a physical shape. A morpheme is an abstract unit of meaning. Now doesn't that distinction make perfect sense?
TL--an example of an inflectional morpheme would be the ending added. When you add -ed to a word to form the past tense, that is an inflectional morph to indicate physically the past tense and the morpheme is that it conveys the action happened in the past (abstract). However, you can also have -t as the morph to indicate past tense and the abstract unit of meaning is that the action happened in the past. How one adds inflection in Swedish is a better example, but it is after 2 a.m. and I've had a couple of glasses of wine and can't think of any examples in Swedish except the word for house but can't remember all the suffixes added and don't wish to embarrass myself on a public forum! A cranberry morpheme is more fun. There are two morphs cran and berry. Cran as a morpheme is a very abstract unit of meaning because it really doesn't carry a meaning, but combined with the two syllable morph berry we understand it. Other cranberry morphemes would be similar words that when broken down don't make sense and are not used in other instances (unlike -un, -like, -ed and the like).
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