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Old 04-02-2013, 01:47 AM   #21
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We get a bacon and banana pizza here and I eat it. It's pretty good! The only way I eat banana is cooked with other things so this works for me :)
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Old 04-02-2013, 02:22 AM   #22
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We get a bacon and banana pizza here and I eat it. It's pretty good! The only way I eat banana is cooked with other things so this works for me :)
Exactly. I think people forget that in a LOT of places "pizza" is a LOT different than what we in the USA would think of as pizza. It's all really regional.

Had a pie in Italy that was no sauce, garlic, calamari, capers, clams, mussels (both still in the shell), shrimp and anchovy baked on a pizza crust. Finished with fresh chopped parsley and olive oil. I wasn't turned off, just thought "who would leave clams and mussels IN the shell on a pizza"? A lot of folks would be turned off I guess because it doesn't meet their idea of what a pizza "is".

Makes me wonder: Is it the ingredients that make it/make it not a pizza, or a persons personal thought of what a pizza should be. Hell, tomatoes were brought to Italy from the Americas, so I am sure at some point, people didn't think that tomatoes belonged on their flat-bread or focaccia. . .especially because they thought back then that tomatoes were toxic, and grown mainly as ornaments.

We need to liberate our generic definitions of what pizza is.
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Old 04-02-2013, 06:13 AM   #23
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i want to liberate some pizza right into me belly!
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Old 04-02-2013, 06:33 AM   #24
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Exactly. I think people forget that in a LOT of places "pizza" is a LOT different than what we in the USA would think of as pizza. It's all really regional.

Had a pie in Italy that was no sauce, garlic, calamari, capers, clams, mussels (both still in the shell), shrimp and anchovy baked on a pizza crust. Finished with fresh chopped parsley and olive oil. I wasn't turned off, just thought "who would leave clams and mussels IN the shell on a pizza"? A lot of folks would be turned off I guess because it doesn't meet their idea of what a pizza "is".

Makes me wonder: Is it the ingredients that make it/make it not a pizza, or a persons personal thought of what a pizza should be. Hell, tomatoes were brought to Italy from the Americas, so I am sure at some point, people didn't think that tomatoes belonged on their flat-bread or focaccia. . .especially because they thought back then that tomatoes were toxic, and grown mainly as ornaments.

We need to liberate our generic definitions of what pizza is.
South Africans are also very open minded when it comes to food. We have foods from all cultures here. We have cheeseburger pizza, Braai Pizza, Nachos Pizza, Thai Green Curry Pizza, Greek Pizza (Olives, Spinach, Feta etc) and many more! That's just the pizzas
I still prefer my pizza with just good tomato sauce and torn fresh mozza but I'll try anything once!
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Old 04-02-2013, 06:44 AM   #25
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When I was growing up back in the 50's, my English/German mother used to make home made pizza. On the day she baked bread, she would use some of the bread dough as pizza dough, made her own sauce and covered it with white brick cheese that she sliced. I think the brick cheese was probably cheaper than mozzarella. No other toppings. This is pizza to me. I made it once with brick cheese and my family didn't like it, but to me, it was like coming home. It is just a little bit different taste than mozzarella and reminds me of my childhood. To this day, I prefer cheese pizza with no other toppings.

Another thing my mother did different is she used longhorn colby cheese in her mac and cheese. Yummy! I tried it with my family and DH said "What the XXXX kind of cheese is in this?" and my son replied "It tastes like sand!" LOL Last time I did that! It seems that what you grew up with sticks in your mind as "the best."

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Old 04-02-2013, 10:10 PM   #26
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Agreed.

When I think of comfort food I think of mommas cooking.

Funny though, I try to prepare her dishes and they never measure up to hers.

What the heck! I'm using her recipes!
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Old 04-02-2013, 10:45 PM   #27
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some college kid should do his or her thesis on that.

it can't be really, completely, statistically true that almost everyone's mom cooked (most dishes) better than themselves, but you hear that over and over.

now MY mom was a great cook that i can never surpass...
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:32 AM   #28
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I've got it!!!

Moms add heaping helpings of love to every dish and since there's no love like a mothers love.....

Whew! I thought I was doing something wrong.
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:13 PM   #29
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My sister-in-law tells me that her husband (my husband's brother) keeps saying he misses his mother's potato salad. In my opinion, it was terrible! She used too much mayonaise and cooked her potatoes too much and sometimes they were the texture of mashed potatoes. I told her just to over cook the potatoes and add tons of mayo and he will be happy. LOL But he loved it because it was all he knew and his mother made it.

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Old 04-03-2013, 01:39 PM   #30
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it can't be really, completely, statistically true that almost everyone's mom cooked (most dishes) better than themselves, but you hear that over and over.
I'll be the first to say that my mother was a terrible cook. She admitted it herself many times. I'll also add that she was a saint who provided for us kids in many other ways, just not in the kitchen.

Mom's one specialty was pot roast. She could make a pretty decent pot roast in the slow cooker. But that was about it. For the most part, my dad did the cooking. The only problem was that he traveled for work, and was really only home on weekends. So most nights we had frozen pizzas, or TV dinners, or we'd go out. Sometimes we'd go down the street to my grandmother's house. She made some pretty incredible German food.

This was the entire reason I learned how to cook. For my 10th or 11th birthday I asked for a cookbook and was given a copy of "The Joy of Cooking." I also watched Julia Child and "The Galloping Gourmet" (anyone remember that show?)" religiously. Before too long, my brother and I were both cooking at least one meal a week. And from about age 13 on, he and I did most of the cooking, unless dad was home.

We used to make some pretty wild concoctions for kids. I remember making vichyssoise on one occasion, and cheese blintzes on another. LOL. We didn't even know what most of this stuff was.

Of course, the other neighborhood kids thought we were a little strange.
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