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Old 12-31-2006, 04:56 AM   #11
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this is funny. I happen to have several French linguists in my life, so help for me is just a phone call away. BUT ... about ten years ago we took a trip to Slovenia. Just about every restaurant we went to had a "foreign language" menu, but English wasn't one of the languages, nor was French most of the time. My husband and I know a word here and there of various languages, plus I had my guide book. I think mostly it helps to not be a very fussy eater when travelling, period. My dad taught me to point at a menu item and hope for the best!
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Old 12-31-2006, 05:38 AM   #12
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To go to low tech, there are the Marling Menu-Master books. These books are small dictionaries that translate a country's food names into English. I know they have them for food from Spain, France, and Italy. Their strong point is that they list dishes, not only the names of a particular food.

They are small (just grabbed my French one, it measures about 4 by 6 inches and is 1/4 inch thick), soft covered, and are easy to toss into luggage or carry about.

Just went to Amazon and they go for ten bucks.

I still live in a very low tech world, and maybe one can find the same thing on a PDA, but still like hard copy.

Just a thought.
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Old 12-31-2006, 05:42 AM   #13
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I think mostly it helps to not be a very fussy eater when travelling, period. My dad taught me to point at a menu item and hope for the best!

On one of our trips to France we were eating in Avignon and no English menu and no English speaking servers. I ordered chicken livers. The young man was SO cute. He looked concerned and tried all ways he could to ask if I was sure that was what I wanted. I finally realized what he was doing and told him it would be just fine--which it was!
However, we left our glossary in the car in Vernon and DH ordered andouilette in a little cafe! I "thought" I knew what it was--and was right!! He couldn't put it in his mouth!!
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Old 01-01-2007, 02:49 AM   #14
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Glossary

Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
When you get the "can't find the server" after a Submit Reply, you can usually click the "back" button and return to the Reply to Thread page that still shows your post.

Why not just save the link to the glossary as a favorite or bookmark?
I posted the link on the 29th.
Here it is again:
At Home With Patricia Wells - Glossary - Dictionary of French Cooking Terms

I am keeping a copy in my Cooking Folder and pull it up for a reference as needed. Then I minimize it to keep it handy.
Going through the postings tonight I have looked up three French terms and found out what they were.

CanDoCook said her husband had ordered "andouilette" and then woudn't eat it.

From the Glossary:
Andouille: large smoked chitterling (tripe) sausage, usually served cold.
Andouillette: small chitterling (tripe) sausage, usually served grilled.

I don't blame him. I don't think I woud have eaten it either!

Enjoy,
Charlie
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Old 01-01-2007, 04:31 AM   #15
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French andouille and andouillette are not the same, exactly, but they are both chitterlin' based.

Americans often get confused by associating the dish with Cajun andouille which is made from the real meat of the piggy, mostly the butt I believe, (not the intestinal tract) and is similar to Polish kielbasa, Spanish chorizo, or Portuguese linguica and chourico.

My brother, many years ago, went to France and, unable to read anything on the menu, ordered some dish with moules having no idea what was to come.

When the food arrived and he realized it was mussels he just paid the bill and left.

If you knew my brother you would know that he will eat nothing more adventurous than he was exposed to after the age of five. The mere idea of allowing a mollusk on a plate within five feet of his gullet gives him the bone shaking heebie jeebies.

Am not criticizing, am just saying that it always helps to know a few culinary terms before one ventures into an area where you may find yourself at a total loss. If not, try to scope out a pizza place that you can go to on your way back, or carry a lot of beef jerky in your luggage.

And as I understand it, andouillette is an 'acquired taste' a term that to me usually translates into 'nasty tasting'. And have been told it has a flavor and odor that reminds one of its source. Don't know.

But I think I will stick with the Cajun product, it is good.
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Old 01-01-2007, 11:08 AM   #16
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I think one of the most fun food experiences in this regard was actually in the 'states, Arlington, Virginia to be specific. But it does go with this line. A co-worker of mine was Polish. He was trying to impress me, and ordered Steak Tartare. He had no idea that it meant raw beef (yes, he ordered it imitating me). I wound up eating mine, plus some of his, while he sat there looking apalled. Many of my friends would be upset to see me tuck into raw beef. I love it. But the look on this man's face when presented with it was worth a million dollars.
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Old 01-01-2007, 11:18 AM   #17
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Moules and steak tartare--food of the gods. DH and I have been known to eat every mussel preparation on a particular restaurant in Denver!!
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Old 01-02-2007, 12:57 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by auntdot
French andouille and andouillette are not the same, exactly, but they are both chitterlin' based.

Americans often get confused by associating the dish with Cajun andouille which is made from the real meat of the piggy, mostly the butt I believe, (not the intestinal tract) and is similar to Polish kielbasa, Spanish chorizo, or Portuguese linguica and chourico.
This Cajun Andouille you mentioned, is what I beleive Emeral L. uses in his Cajun dishes.

The Portuguese Linguica is a favorite of a group I belonged to that use to have meeting in the Santa Maria - Lompoc area of Central California. (Same Santa Maria of BBQ fame).

Charlie
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