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Old 10-10-2014, 01:01 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
And over the years they've really come down in price. The first one I got many years ago was something like $25, a few years ago I found another one for $7. With my extremely prolific tree, the work goes quickly with two of us peeling.
I have one that clamps to the edge of the counter or table. I am not to fond of that feature. I have often looked at the ones with the suction cup, but wonder if they are better than the clamp. You almost have to bore a hole in the underneath for the clamp to really take hold. I have tried putting a wet cloth under the clamp. Not much better.
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Old 10-10-2014, 01:05 PM   #12
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Applesauce -- to peel or not to peel?

Mine have suction cups, I like them.
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Old 10-10-2014, 06:56 PM   #13
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Okay --- I just made a batch of applesauce without peeling the apples. I put the cooked apples in my food processor and pulsed them until they were broken down, but still a little chunky. I added cinnamon and a little honey. Actually, I like it -- it is a little bit chewy, a nice texture, and I think the skins make it tasty.
I'll make another batch with peels on and then one or two batches without. You're right, Addie and Dawgluver, I should buy an apple peeler. Back to the apples ......
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Old 10-10-2014, 08:14 PM   #14
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Okay --- I just made a batch of applesauce without peeling the apples. I put the cooked apples in my food processor and pulsed them until they were broken down, but still a little chunky. I added cinnamon and a little honey. Actually, I like it -- it is a little bit chewy, a nice texture, and I think the skins make it tasty.
I'll make another batch with peels on and then one or two batches without. You're right, Addie and Dawgluver, I should buy an apple peeler. Back to the apples ......
When I don't use my peeler, I have a serrated manual peeler and I more often than not will peel one continuous strip to the end. Yeah, I like to show off my skills in the kitchen. But if you are going to be doing these apples each year, then you definitely need an automatic peeler.
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Old 10-11-2014, 06:07 PM   #15
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I've never made apple sauce with the peel left on, either to eat or to freeze(well, you know what I mean) but having read your replies I think I might give it a go. It'll save a lot of bother and if the peel adds to the flavour so much the better.
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Old 10-11-2014, 09:08 PM   #16
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I hadn't made applesauce with peels either, Mad Cook, but I tried it and now I have 10 pint jars in the freezer. I like the chewy texture and taste. You can process the apples in your food processor to either chunky, smooth, or somewhere in between. I still have a large bucket full of apples. I'm going to make more applesauce and apple breads. The frozen applesauce can be used later (Thanksgiving, etc.) to make delicious applesauce cake. Try a small batch, Mad
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Old 10-12-2014, 04:41 AM   #17
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Try using a thin layer of applesauce on these instead of the date jam.

Date Bars
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Old 10-12-2014, 06:31 AM   #18
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Good idea, Aunt Bea. I'll save the Date Bar recipe and give it a try using applesauce instead of date jam. Sounds yummy! Thanks for sharing!
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:33 AM   #19
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I hadn't made applesauce with peels either, Mad Cook, but I tried it and now I have 10 pint jars in the freezer. I like the chewy texture and taste. You can process the apples in your food processor to either chunky, smooth, or somewhere in between. I still have a large bucket full of apples. I'm going to make more applesauce and apple breads. The frozen applesauce can be used later (Thanksgiving, etc.) to make delicious applesauce cake. Try a small batch, Mad Cook, and see if you like it.
Sadly, my two apple trees haven't had even one apple between them this year although they did quite well last year. No blossom either so it could be old age because they were mature trees when my parents bought the house 50+ years ago. They are both James Grieve which is a "dual purpose" apple - a bit sharp in flavour but useful for eating and for cooking.

If I make any apple sauce this year it will be with Bramley's Seedling cooking apples from the greengrocer's (ie fruit and veg shop). It isn't grown anywhere else in the world (at least, I didn't think so until I looked at Wikipaedia Bramley apple - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - there are a few growers producing them in the US and Canada). It's a very sour cooking apple and it "falls" when cooked so great for puree but not much use if you like your apple pies chunky. Lovely flavour though.

It has an interesting history. All Bramley apples, wherever in the world they are grown, are descended from a tree grown from a seed in 1809 which is still growing in a garden in Southwell (pron: Suthell!!) in Nottinghamshire, just round the corner from my cousins' house.

If you wanted to try them in north America I would think you are more likely to see them on a farmers' market than in a run-of-the-mill supermarket.
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Old 10-12-2014, 08:13 PM   #20
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Sorry that you didnt get any apples from your trees this year, Mad Cook. It could be the weather. I know, here in California, the weather has a great deal to do with fruit trees and crops.

Wow! What an interesting history about the Bramley apple and the original is alive and well! I have never heard of these apples, but will look for them at our local farmers' market.

Let us know if you try making applesauce with the peels on!
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