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Old 07-19-2014, 12:36 PM   #1
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Australian finger limes?

Has anybody ever seen or used these? The "pulp" of the fruit is supposed to be large caviar-like beads that burst when you bite down on them. A relatively close nursery supposedly has trees. Craig's going to check it out the next time he's up that way.

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Old 07-19-2014, 01:24 PM   #2
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I've never heard of them, but they sure do sound fun and interesting! Looking forward to hearing more....
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Old 07-19-2014, 01:30 PM   #3
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Sort of like those tapioca bubble drinks. I've never heard of them either, sounds interesting!
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Old 07-22-2014, 03:37 PM   #4
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Went by the nursery today and picked up a finger lime tree.





Now I have to go back! Sitting next to the finger lime was a kaffir lime tree. I didn't have enough money (they only take cash) or room in the truck cab to put it.
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Old 07-22-2014, 03:43 PM   #5
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Australian finger limes?

Wow, thorny little devil! Neat tree.
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Old 07-22-2014, 03:47 PM   #6
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Wow, thorny little devil! Neat tree.
You aren't kidding! I thought key lime trees were thorny until I saw this one.
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Old 07-22-2014, 09:34 PM   #7
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The few fruits on it are tiny, about 1-1/2 to 2 inches. One fell off while he was bringing it in. We cut it open. Looked like a regular lime and I was ticked because I had called and asked about it to make sure it was the right kind before he went. I very lightly squeezed it and out popped all these little beads of pulp/juice just like the pictures. They were pretty potent. Hopefully it was just that they were immature and not ripe. Otherwise, WOW, they pack a punch and are bitter and sharp.
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Old 07-25-2014, 03:21 AM   #8
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So what would you use these for? Suitable for Key Lime Pie? Sounds interesting.
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Old 07-25-2014, 06:46 AM   #9
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So what would you use these for? Suitable for Key Lime Pie? Sounds interesting.
We intend to use these as a unique garnish because the pulp is round and looks like little pearls. As far as the Key Lime Pie, lets just not go there.
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Old 07-25-2014, 10:31 AM   #10
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We intend to use these as a unique garnish because the pulp is round and looks like little pearls. As far as the Key Lime Pie, lets just not go there.
Not one of your success stories?
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Old 07-25-2014, 10:43 AM   #11
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You need key limes to make key lime pie. Otherwise it's just lime pie.
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Old 07-25-2014, 03:06 PM   #12
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Not one of your success stories?
Actually the result of that key lime pie discussion was quite successful! The thorn is gone.
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Old 07-25-2014, 06:22 PM   #13
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Re limes

Many years ago I read that so called "Florida limes" were actually a form of lemon. I don't think it actually meant all limes grown in Florida but a variety called "Florida Limes". I have never seen anything about this anywhere else and when I spoke to the fruit and veg manager he'd never come across it.

Any thoughts on this?
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Old 07-25-2014, 06:36 PM   #14
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Many years ago I read that so called "Florida limes" were actually a form of lemon. I don't think it actually meant all limes grown in Florida but a variety called "Florida Limes". I have never seen anything about this anywhere else and when I spoke to the fruit and veg manager he'd never come across it.

Any thoughts on this?
The most common lime, which is commercially grown, is the Persian lime. The original tree won't grow here, so they graft them onto lemon trunks. If not cared for properly by removing the "suckers" from the trunk, they will revert to lemons. To my knowledge, there are no native limes. Key Limes will grow in their original form, without the need for grafting. Seems Finger and Kaffir limes will do so as well.
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Old 07-25-2014, 09:13 PM   #15
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Wow, "lime caviar" it's called. Living where I do surrounded by citrus orchards, this is fascinating. Here's an interesting article from the Los Angeles Times.

http://articles.latimes.com/2009/dec...ch18-2009dec23
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