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Old 08-10-2014, 08:18 AM   #1
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Fruit salsa = chutney?

I don't know what Chuttney is, but would like to learn.

In Texas, this time of year, we take Ripe Fruit and make..

Fruit Salsa!

1 cp. ripe fruit, peaches, melons, anything really..

1 Jalapeno pepper, but not too hot, this is a fruit salsa.

a bit of onion.

a clov. of garlic.

something green herb, usually cilantro here, but parsly or basil works as well.

mix with a bit of salt and black pepper and let sit for a while..

The salt draws out the juices..

This is served as a condoment for meat..

Pork chops, or any meat..

Is this the same as Chuttney?

Thanks, Eric, Austin Tx.

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Old 08-10-2014, 08:26 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giggler View Post
I don't know what Chuttney is, but would like to learn.

In Texas, this time of year, we take Ripe Fruit and make..

Fruit Salsa!

1 cp. ripe fruit, peaches, melons, anything really..

1 Jalapeno pepper, but not too hot, this is a fruit salsa.

a bit of onion.

a clov. of garlic.

something green herb, usually cilantro here, but parsly or basil works as well.

mix with a bit of salt and black pepper and let sit for a while..

The salt draws out the juices..

This is served as a condoment for meat..

Pork chops, or any meat..

Is this the same as Chuttney?

Thanks, Eric, Austin Tx.
What, no lime juice or other acid for balance? Never made chutney either, but I think it gets cooked down to a semi-jam like consistency.
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Old 08-10-2014, 08:52 AM   #3
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Yes, juice of a lime.. I forgot!

also, in winter we make Jezzebell Sauce..

fruit jam mixed with Horseradish! very nice on pork chops also!

Eric.
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Old 08-10-2014, 09:40 AM   #4
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When I think of chutney I think of Major Grey's Mango Chutney.

I must confess I buy a bottle of Crosse & Blackwell's at WalMart when I need it, oh the shame!

It can be used in many ways. The simplest I have found is to spoon it over a brick of cream cheese and scoop it up with a crisp cracker.


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Old 08-10-2014, 09:54 AM   #5
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I have a recipe for sweet and sour apple chutney with onions and raisins. It's cooked to a chunky jam-like consistency. It goes well with roasted or pan-fried pork, cold roast beef, or a brick of cream cheese.

I can't think of a defining difference between cooked fruit salsa and chutney. I think it's just that they originated in different places and use different flavor profiles.
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Old 08-10-2014, 10:21 AM   #6
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It's chutney in India and salsa in Mexico. Sort of like ravioli in Italy are gyosa in Japan and pierogi in Poland.
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Old 08-10-2014, 12:21 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giggler View Post
I don't know what Chuttney is, but would like to learn.

In Texas, this time of year, we take Ripe Fruit and make..

Fruit Salsa!

1 cp. ripe fruit, peaches, melons, anything really..

1 Jalapeno pepper, but not too hot, this is a fruit salsa.

a bit of onion.

a clov. of garlic.

something green herb, usually cilantro here, but parsly or basil works as well.

mix with a bit of salt and black pepper and let sit for a while..

The salt draws out the juices..

This is served as a condoment for meat..

Pork chops, or any meat..

Is this the same as Chuttney?

Thanks, Eric, Austin Tx.
As I understand it, salsa is an immediate sort of thing- make it and eat if sort of think whereas chutney as we know it now developed as a way of preserving fruit (or veg in some cases) and originally would be eaten to enlivening a boring winter diet. Good with cheese as well as cold meat, pork pies etc.

I think the idea of chutneys came from India where they were and are still served as an accompaniment to curries. In India they are sometimes made of available raw veg just for the next meal (in a way I suppose this would make them a bit like salsas) or long cooked preparations for keeping and using as required. When they were brought back to Britain by returning Victorian (and earlier) nabobs they would be developed by their British cooks to encompass apples, pears, beetroot, marrow, etc., in place of the exotic mangos, etc that then weren't available here.

There were dishes in mediaeval cookery books which were slightly similar, such as one called a "Compost" (!!!) being a fruit and vegetable concoction pickled in honey & wine - a bit like a chutney I would imagine.

I gave my mothers' recipe for beet(root) chutney on here a couple of weeks back if you can find it. Apart from that I make apple chutney with windfalls out of the garden, plum chutney and occasionally marrow chutney but wasn't inspired by the last - it needs more spice than most recipes give to make it interesting. During my sort out when I moved house I found a crate under the stairs full of various chutneys dated 2004 . They're in the garage at the moment while I decide if I should test them or not
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Old 08-10-2014, 12:23 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
What, no lime juice or other acid for balance? Never made chutney either, but I think it gets cooked down to a semi-jam like consistency.
Yes, it does. It's intended to last you though the winter (in the days when there were no freezers) and perk up your winter diet.
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Old 08-10-2014, 12:25 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
When I think of chutney I think of Major Grey's Mango Chutney.

I must confess I buy a bottle of Crosse & Blackwell's at WalMart when I need it, oh the shame!

It can be used in many ways. The simplest I have found is to spoon it over a brick of cream cheese and scoop it up with a crisp cracker.


Major Grey's Chutney | SAVEUR
I think I could go for that
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Old 08-10-2014, 01:14 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
It's chutney in India and salsa in Mexico. Sort of like ravioli in Italy are gyosa in Japan and pierogi in Poland.
Exactly.

I have seen recipes for both preserved chutney and fresh chutney.

I imagine there are some preserved salsas, though they may not be as jam-like in consistency as preserved chutneys usually are.
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