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Old 01-04-2006, 12:14 PM   #11
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Lemon Pudding Cake

2 eggs, separated
1 tsp grated lemon peel
1/4 cup lemon juice
2/3 cups milk
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup AP flour
1/4 tsp salt

Heat oven to 350
Beat egg whites until stiff peaks form.
Beat egg yolks slighty.
Beat in lemon peel, lemon juice and milk.
Beat in remaining ingredients until smooth.
Fold into beaten egg whites.
Pour into ungreased 1 quart casserole.
Place casserole in square pan, 9x9x2, on oven rack
Pour very hot water (one inch deep) into square pan.

Bake until golden brown 45-50 minutes.
Remove casserole from the water.
Serve warm or cool with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

If you want more of a saucy cake use 1 cup of milk.

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Old 01-04-2006, 12:47 PM   #12
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Another idea....

go to the search box above and type in MAGIC LEMON PIE.

It'll take you to a great recipe. I've made it a few times and everyone always loves it.

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Old 01-04-2006, 01:09 PM   #13
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In numerous cookbooks (especially Middle Eastern and Moroccan ones) I've seen recipe for preserved lemons, though I've not made them yet myself, they seem very interesting. Here is a recipe I found for preserved lemons, I think that you could easily multiple the recipe.

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Old 01-04-2006, 01:49 PM   #14
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How about some frozen lemon ice pops? I've seen small containers of them in our frozen foods section that are called "italian ice". Maybe a lemon meringue pie?
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Old 01-04-2006, 02:03 PM   #15
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Hi jkath, if you are adventurous here is a really yummy preserved lemon/lemon pickle recipe. In India and other Middle eastern countries lemons are preserved at room temperature and they last for a year or so. We actually like it to be old.

Anyway here is how you do it.

Cut the lemons into quarters (skin and all). You can leave the seeds in it too or discard it if you have time.

Next add salt (good Kosher salt) about half a cup to the lemons and stir it together then place them in a large glass sterlized bottle. Cover and let them sit for several weeks (or a month is even better). It will start to macerate in the salt and it's own liquid and get tender.

After a month you can make it into a real Indian sweet pickle as follows:

Remove the lemons from the bottle in a large bowl and reserve.

In a saucepan add the jucie from the bowl and stir it with 2 cups of sugar/brown sugar or more if you like it sweeter and chilli powder to your liking. Pour this over the lemons and stir and place it back again in a clean sterilized bottle. The pickle is ready to be eaten.

The more authentic lemon pickles have onion seeds and fenugreek seeds (powdered) in them but it may be a bit too strong for the Western audience.
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Old 01-04-2006, 02:46 PM   #16
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Here's one thats really close to what I make. I don't measure alot so your better going with someone elses recipe that has measurements. Unfort., it only uses 1 1/2 lemons but hey thats better than teaspoons. Anyway, here goes:

Chicken with Rosemary and Lemon Salt

Recipe from foodnetwork

2 chickens, about 2 to 3 pounds each
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 or 2 fresh rosemary sprigs
1 1/2 lemons, cut into chunks
Seasoned Salt:
2 tablespoons very finely minced lemon zest
2 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary
2 tablespoons sea salt, preferablyy gray salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Preheat oven to 450 degrees F if you have no convection fan, or to 425 degrees F if you have a convection fan.
Rinse the chickens inside and out and dry well.
Make the salt: In a bowl, combine the lemon zest, rosemary, salt, and pepper, mixing well. Rub the chicken all over with the olive oil, and then rub with 3 tablespoons of the seasoned salt. (Reserve the remaining salt for another use.) Tuck the rosemary sprigs and lemon chunks into the chicken cavity. You don't need to truss the chicken.
Place the bird on a rack in a roasting pan and roast for 15 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature by 75 degrees F and continue roasting until the juices run clear when a thigh is pierced with a skewer, about 50 to 55 minutes longer. Transfer the chicken to a platter and let rest for at least 10 minutes before carving.
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Old 01-04-2006, 02:49 PM   #17
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Preserving lemon adds an exotic flavor to North African tagines but it can also contribute a tasty and interesting element to many other cuisines. Experiment. Remember to reduce the usual amount of salt to allow for the saltiness of the lemon.
What You Need:
1 Cup salt, preferably kosher, canning or sea salt
Lemons, preferably organic
2 pint jars with lids
Clean and have ready 2 pint (or 4 half-pint) jars with screw or clamp lids. Use plastic or glass lids if possible; metal lids tend to corrode from the salt and can be difficult to remove.Wash lemons to remove any wax. Trim off any serious blemishes and remove the hard stem area.

Cut each lemon length-wise into 8 wedges and remove seeds.

Cover the bottom of each jar with a thin layer of salt.

Spread about 1/4 cup of salt on a plate. Press each lemon wedge into the salt, turning to coat all sides. Pack a layer of wedges into a jar and press down hard to release juice. Sprinkle salt over the lemons and continue to layer in lemon wedges, pressing down firmly and sprinkling in extra salt to fill any gaps. Fill the jar all the way to the top, pressing down so juice completely covers the lemon pieces. Close covers securely and leave to cure at room temperature for about 2 weeks. If there seem to be air pockets, invert the jars for a day or two.

If the lid is stuck to the jar when you try to open it, invert the jar in a pan of hot water to dissolve the salt around the lid.
Refrigerate after opening.
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Old 01-04-2006, 03:25 PM   #18
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no limoncello, jkath?
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
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Old 01-04-2006, 04:17 PM   #19
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Being one he hates to see good foods go to waste, if you think you're going to lose some of them before you use them up, I suggest you zest some and dry the zest, then squeeze them and freeze the juice.

I go through a lot of lemons...they seem to freshen up so many things. When I cook fresh asparagus, I saute it a few minutes in olive oil with S&P and garlic, then squeeze lemon juice over the top, turn down heat, and let it steam until tender. That works with other vegies too.
I squeeze it over meats before cooking...
Rub my cutting board and cut side of onions before slicing and get NO tears...
Add lemon juice to water when slicing potatoes to keep them from turning brown...
Put thin slices over my fish or chicken when baking or braising...
Add a dash to just about any cold drink, including ice water...
Add a bit of juice or zest to fruit desserts...

Does that help?
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Old 01-04-2006, 06:06 PM   #20
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Lemony Cheesecake Bars


Lemony Cheesecake Bars
Yields: 24 servings

1 ˝ c graham cracker crumbs
1/3 c finely chopped pecans
1/3 c sugar
1/3 c margarine or butter, melted
two 8 oz packages cream cheese, softened
one 14 oz can Eagle Brand® Sweetened Condensed Milk (NOT evaporated milk)
2 eggs
˝ c lemon juice from concentrate

Preheat oven to 325°F. In medium mixing bowl, combine crumbs, pecans, sugar
and melted margarine; mix well. Reserve 1/3 c; press remaining mixture into
a 13x9x2" baking pan. Bake 6 minutes. Remove and cool on wire rack.
Meanwhile, in large mixer bowl, beat cheese until fluffy. Gradually beat in
Eagle Brand. Add eggs; beat until just combined. Stir in lemon juice.
Carefully spoon mixture atop crust in pan. Spoon reserved crumb mixture to
make diagonal stripes on top of cheese mixture or sprinkle to cover.
Bake about 30 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean.
Cool on wire rack 1 hour. Store in refrigerator. Cut into bars to serve.

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