"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Fruit & Nuts
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-22-2005, 12:13 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,704
a good rocking chop with a chef's knife should go right through, halving them. then it's easy to scoop out the meat.

it wouldn't be the holiday season in nyc without (angry, suicidal) street vendors selling charcoal roasted chestnuts in little brown paper bags.

one dolluh, one dolluh, no coke, pessi.
__________________

__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2005, 12:27 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,357
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
it wouldn't be the holiday season in nyc without (angry, suicidal) street vendors selling charcoal roasted chestnuts in little brown paper bags.

one dolluh, one dolluh, no coke, pessi.
& I'll throw in a genuine Rolex for 50 cents.
__________________

__________________
mish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2005, 11:13 AM   #13
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
I have never even seen a chestnut...they don't have them around here.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2005, 04:25 PM   #14
DC Grandma
 
Dove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: USA,California
Posts: 3,217
Chestnut history
Probably one of the first foods eaten by man, the chestnut dates back to prehistoric times. The chestnut tree, Castanea sativa, was first introduced to Europe via Greece. The majority of the chestnut trees currently found in America are of native European stock, but Native Americans feasted on America's own variety, Castanea dentata, long before European immigrants introduced their stock to America. In 1904, diseased Asian chestnut trees planted on Long Island, New York carried a fungus hitchiker that nearly devasted the American chestnut population, leaving only a few groves in California and the Pacific Northwest to escape the blight. Nowadays most of the chestnut food crop is imported from Japan, China, Spain, and Italy. Chestnuts are known as marrons in France and some parts of Europe.
These starchy nuts are given to the poor as a symbol of sustenance on the Feast of Saint Martin and are also traditionally eaten on Saint Simon's Day in Tuscany. Legend has it that the Greek army survived on their stores of chestnuts during their retreat from Asia Minor in 401-399 B.C. Chestnuts contain twice as much starch as potatoes. It's no wonder they are still an important food crop in China, Japan, and southern Europe where they are often ground into a meal for breadmaking, thus giving rise to the nickname of "bread tree."
Chestnut timber resembles its cousin the oak, in both color and texture, and is highly-valued. Also known for its tanning properties, the trees can live up to five hundred years and usually do not begin to produce fruit until they are forty years old. Getting to the chestnut meat
The chestnut fruit from the tree takes a bit of work to get to the nut itself. The nuts are encased in a spikey husk enclosure, with two to three nuts per each prickly burr. When mature, the fruit falls to the ground and are then shelled of the husk to get to the thin, smooth-shelled nut. Although we refer to them as nuts, the meat inside is soft and starchy, more akin to grains rather than crunchy like traditional nuts. It is the only nut primarily treated as a vegetable due to its starch content. The European varieties are a bit larger in size than the native American variety. Horse chestnuts (generally considered inedible) and water chestnuts are of completely different species. You will most likely be buying chestnuts already separated from the outer husk.
__________________
May I always be the person my dog thinks I am.

Walk towards the Sunshine and the Shadows will fall behind you!
Dove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2005, 02:41 PM   #15
Senior Cook
 
kansasgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 469
I am somewhat impatient, so I discovered that you can cook chestnuts very nicely in the microwave. Cut an 'X' in the flat side, sprinkle with water, and cook in microwave on low power for about 3-3 1/2 minutes. They do not have the fabulous roasted taste, but peel easily and can be used in any recipe. Much faster than roasting!
__________________
Be determined to live life with flair and laughter!
kansasgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2005, 02:45 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
kansasgirl, just had to pop in here and say how nice it is to see you back!
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2005, 02:48 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,704
that's how i prepare them for my birds, kansasgirl. if i don't nuke them, they won't eat 'em, but rather just play around, eventually throwing them out of their cages.
i've tasted nuked chestnuts; they really need the charcoal taste.
__________________

__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.