"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-08-2007, 10:42 AM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: S. W. Minnesota
Posts: 157
If your fiance is actually cooking the recipe, ie. bringing the temperature to boiling, most of the alcohol will boil off anyway. I would use polish vodka as a flavor element.

Years ago, I had fishing buddies who would make glogg for the trip using Everclear and a bunch of other ingredients. Any new guys in the bunch would have the task of heating the glogg, while the others in the next room would wait for the whoosh as it caught fire with wet towels. Funny, as long as the new guy didn't panic and knock it of the stove!

By the way, distilling ethanol to 100% (anhydrous) is extremely expensive, as the alcohol will actually absorb the humidity out of the air, if exposed. 94-95% used to cost around half as much, in industrial applications, for this reason.
__________________

__________________
Walt Bulander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 10:49 AM   #12
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt Bulander
If your fiance is actually cooking the recipe, ie. bringing the temperature to boiling, most of the alcohol will boil off anyway.
This is actually a common misconception. It all depends on cooking method and length of cooking as to how much alcohol will cook off. You would be surprised at how much actually remains. See this chart for a breakdown.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 10:52 AM   #13
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 3
Thanks to all

I believe I can convince her to try some "standard" vodka perhaps in slightly higher quantities than the recipe calls for. Experimentation can be great fun and I am looking forward to it. Thanks again to each of you.
__________________
timothycmoore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 10:56 AM   #14
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
There are only a few reasons to use alcohol in a recipe. One reason is for the flavor of the alcohol itself. Something like Grand Marnier or Kaluah come to mind. Those alcohols have very definite flavors that will add to a dish.

The other reason to use alcohol is to extract alcohol soluble flavors from something. Flavors are either water soluble, fat soluble, or alcohol soluble. There is a flavor component in tomatoes for instance that you will only taste in the presence of alcohol. That is why dish like pasta ala vodka works. In dishes like that you usually want the alcohol to have as little flavor as possible. This is why vodka is usually used. My guess is that using a standard vodka will work for what your fiance is looking for.

Make sure to let us know how it turned out.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 11:16 AM   #15
Senior Cook
 
JDP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 281
Send a message via Yahoo to JDP
Further to your next to last post, we do have a bottle of a drink called Arbsinth I believe which comes from the Czech Republic if memory serves me right. Its alcoholic content is about 75 -80%. However, when you drink it, you are supposed to light it up. It burns with a nice blue flame on the surface. You are supposed to drink it when the flame goes off. By that time, its alcoholic content is greatly reduced and therefore it is much safer to drink. The bottle does carry a warning about drinking it neat.[/quote]

Hey Boufo I believe that actually comes Sweden or one of the Northern European countries. It has an extract (woodruff ?) which gives it a hallucigenic effect supposedly and is illegal in the USA. It is very bitter in flavor, bright green in color and yes there is a pouring procedure that involves sugar and fire. It's nick name is the Little Green Fairy, or something like that.

JDP
__________________
JDP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 11:18 AM   #16
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
I have never seen 200 proof sold, but I have seen and have bought Everclear grain alcohol which is clearly produced for consumption. Everclear is 190 proof and is only legal in some states. For instance, it is not legal in MA, but it is legal in NH.
200 proof alcohol is, under normal real world distilation techniques, impossible.

While it it true that alcohol boils before water, as the distilation boil goes longer (or warmer) an "all for one" phenomenon occurs where the water goes with the alcohol up the distillation column. As a result, 190 proof is about the highest you can get. (And trust me, it's plenty high enough!)

Not that I uh, have any books or anything on this stuff....

John
__________________

ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 11:36 AM   #17
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDP
It has an extract (woodruff ?) which gives it a hallucigenic effect supposedly and is illegal in the USA.
I believe you are thinking of wormwood.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 11:37 AM   #18
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I never knew that John. Interesting stuff!
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 11:43 AM   #19
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Never tried Everclear, but I do know that people drink it as I have seen people bring it back from other states and put it away. I have had Bacardi 151 in some drinks before. It typically comes in frozen drinks around here. They use regular rum in the drink, and then insert a long glass tube filled with 151 in the center.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 11:49 AM   #20
Executive Chef
 
boufa06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Volos, Greece
Posts: 3,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDP
Hey Boufo I believe that actually comes Sweden or one of the Northern European countries. It has an extract (woodruff ?) which gives it a hallucigenic effect supposedly and is illegal in the USA. It is very bitter in flavor, bright green in color and yes there is a pouring procedure that involves sugar and fire. It's nick name is the Little Green Fairy, or something like that.
JDP
JDP, regardless of the country of origin, what I wanted to draw attention to is the fact that due to its high alcoholic content, the drink is not recommended for consumption neat but is supposed to be treated in such a way as to reduce its alcoholic content greatly before it's finally consumed.
__________________

__________________
The proof of the pudding is in the eating!
boufa06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.