"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-08-2007, 12:09 PM   #21
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
I was always under the impression that the sugar cube (and sugar is not always a "must") was placed on the absinthe spoon over the glass. Water is then drizzled in very slowly allowing the sugar cube to melt until the proper "cloudiness" (louche) is gained. If sugar is not involved then water is just poured slowly in. No flame is involved.

BUT, back to the OP's question - GB answered it. I have several recipes that require Vodka - all of which are tomato sauce based.
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 12:16 PM   #22
Executive Chef
 
boufa06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Volos, Greece
Posts: 3,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDP
Hey Boufo I believe that actually comes Sweden or one of the Northern European countries. It has an extract (woodruff ?) which gives it a hallucigenic effect supposedly and is illegal in the USA. It is very bitter in flavor, bright green in color and yes there is a pouring procedure that involves sugar and fire. It's nick name is the Little Green Fairy, or something like that.
JDP
JDP, further to the origin of species alcoholic, I found my bottle of Absinth. It states on the label that it's bottled by Hill's Liquere, a company established in 1920 and located in the Czech Republic. Incidentally, its alcoholic content is a paltry 70% (140 proof) compared to the inflated 75-80% I stated earlier. Should we start with a shot of it before we continue with Ouzo on your next visit to Greece?
__________________

__________________
The proof of the pudding is in the eating!
boufa06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 12:24 PM   #23
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,253
Quote:
Originally Posted by boufa06
JDP, regardless of the country of origin, what I wanted to draw attention to is the fact that due to its high alcoholic content, the drink is not recommended for consumption neat but is supposed to be treated in such a way as to reduce its alcoholic content greatly before it's finally consumed.

But flaming really doesn't reduce alcohol content that much. Check out the chart that GB posted.



The alcohol that is from Scandanavia is called Aquavit.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 12:27 PM   #24
Executive Chef
 
boufa06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Volos, Greece
Posts: 3,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
BUT, back to the OP's question - GB answered it.
I hereby move to strike all other posts from this thread except the original one and GB's answer. Will anyone second it?
__________________
The proof of the pudding is in the eating!
boufa06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 12:43 PM   #25
Executive Chef
 
boufa06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Volos, Greece
Posts: 3,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
But flaming really doesn't reduce alcohol content that much. Check out the chart that GB posted.
jennyema, the table you mentioned fail to state for how long flaming persists. Never mind. Let's assume that, as the table states, 75% of the alcohol initially present is left after flaming. So, the 'after flaming' alcoholic content of Absinth becomes 0.75 x 70 = 52.5% (105 proof). Isn't this a significant reduction of the original alcoholic content? I did not imply that after flaming Absinth became equivalent to Coca Cola. In reality, the alcoholic content 'after flaming' is much less because the flaming goes on for much longer than the instant flaming process probably assumed by the ones who compile the table in question.
__________________
The proof of the pudding is in the eating!
boufa06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2007, 12:21 AM   #26
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: everett, ma
Posts: 225
Send a message via AIM to tsi88kid
sorry to interject but correct me if im wrong isn't moonshine 98% or something like that. I'm not even sure if it is still made but I have heard from different sources that it is. If so wouldnt that be a suitable alcohol if he could find it?
__________________
tsi88kid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2007, 12:36 AM   #27
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: everett, ma
Posts: 225
Send a message via AIM to tsi88kid
Quote:
Originally Posted by boufa06
Dear God, GB! You must be quite a drinker! And I thought that, despite my background, I wasn't doing too bad myself! At least I know now what drink to offer you should you come around one of these days. Cheers!

Further to your next to last post, we do have a bottle of a drink called Arbsinth I believe which comes from the Czech Republic if memory serves me right. Its alcoholic content is about 75 -80%. However, when you drink it, you are supposed to light it up. It burns with a nice blue flame on the surface. You are supposed to drink it when the flame goes off. By that time, its alcoholic content is greatly reduced and therefore it is much safer to drink. The bottle does carry a warning about drinking it neat.

I have actually done some research on absinth. It was created in a lot of different european countries. From what I read a few months back the czech republic actually just lifted a ban on absinth. Absinth is about 70% alcohol if memory serves me right. The way that you are supposed to "prepare" Absinth is by pouring the Absinth into the cup until you have about 1/3 filled up. You then place the slotted or "absinthe" spoon over the glass and put the sugar cube on top as kitchenelf mentioned. you then pour water over the sugar cub slowely until you fill the glass. You then stir the remaining sugar that has not mixed at the bottom.
__________________
tsi88kid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2007, 02:05 AM   #28
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsi88kid
I'm not even sure if it is still made
Um, I hear it is still made and it MAY come in plum and blackberry flavors and peach is quite tasty too - I hear anyway.

My favorite motto for a bumper sticker: Tennessee, where the moon comes over the mountains in gallon jugs.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2007, 05:46 AM   #29
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
For the original poster, the difference between 94 proof and 90 proof is not that much and the grandmother could probably use just the same amount. Certainly not double--that would throw the liquid proportions off appreciably.

EverClear is essentially legal moonshine!! And as others have said, whether it is sold or not is determined by state law. Can you say Purple Jesus, the popular adaptation of lab alcohol!!
As for flaming--or even boiling, as wine preps. There is still an appreciable amount of alcohol left. It might not be important for any except those that are avoiding alcohol, for any reason. But for those serving to them, it IS important to know that fact in the name of fairness.
__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2007, 11:03 AM   #30
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: everett, ma
Posts: 225
Send a message via AIM to tsi88kid
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
Um, I hear it is still made and it MAY come in plum and blackberry flavors and peach is quite tasty too - I hear anyway.

My favorite motto for a bumper sticker: Tennessee, where the moon comes over the mountains in gallon jugs.
hahahaha nice and you're still alive to tell the story. did you end up like that smiley?
__________________

__________________
tsi88kid is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.