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Old 06-09-2014, 10:43 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Sharon B View Post
Definite beginner here. Jeez, you would think at 56 I would be able to make more than a BLT. Any help is appreciated.
Sharon, you've probably already noticed the different food categories at the top of the forum - pick a type of food or dish that you and hubby like and start from there! And if you have any questions, ask away, someone will be along to help.
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Old 06-10-2014, 01:02 AM   #12
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Quick and easy soy glazed salmon. 20 minutes, 1 pan, 5 ingredients!

Awesome to have such welcoming feedback to my post! Here's the recipe let me know if you have questions!

Cooking is hard, I don’t have the right equipment, I don’t have time…the list of excuses goes on and on. But wouldn’t trying to cook be fun? Other people praising how great your food is, the ability to cook and feed yourself or loved ones whenever you’re hungry, unwinding in the kitchen and making a meal while drinking a glass of red wine giving cooking instructions to an imaginary Food Network videographer (okay, that’s just me)…I know you’re busy just like I am, that’s why I’m sharing a tasty salmon you can make in 20 minutes, beginning to end.

I’m going to give you exact instructions for a yummy salmon filet that’s easy cleanup, only has 5 ingredients, and the total time (prep + cooking is 20 minutes). Interested? Okay great! Read on.

Oh, and if you are hesitant about investing into some of these ingredients that you may not already have because you’ll never use them again check out the tips on the very bottom for alternate uses of these ingredients so they don’t go to waste!

Scared you’ll screw it up? Naw man, jumping head first into an easy recipe will help you start the good habit of cooking and feeding yourself and will help you acquaint yourself with different types of ingredients. Finally, if you screw it up (which is impossible if you follow these instructions exactly) then call for pizza! No biggie.


Equipment you need:
1. Oven (I prefer a toaster/oven because it’s small and easy) but any oven will do
2. Aluminum foil

Ingredients you need:
1. Filet of salmon
2. Soy sauce (or Tamari if you’re gluten-free): 2 tbsp
3. Hoisin sauce: 2 tbsp
4. 1 lemon (for garnish and sauce): ľ wedge
5. Garlic powder: 2 tsp

Optional ingredients to take it to the next level:
• Rice wine vinegar: 2 tsp
• Sriracha (if you like spicy): 1-2 tsp
• Fresh, minced garlic: 2 tsp (in lieu of garlic powder)


Instructions (serving for one person)

1. Defrost- If the salmon is frozen, make sure you defrost it. I recommend taking it out the night before and placing in the fridge for a full day to defrost. If it’s frozen and you’re hungry, throw it in a bowl of warm water for about 20-30 min and it will defrost. Don’t throw it in without it being in a Ziploc or plastic container of sorts by the way.

2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees on “broil”

3. Marinade- In a small bowl put 2 tbsp. of soy sauce, 2 tbsp. of hoisin sauce, ľ of the lemon freshly squeezed in there, 1 tsp of garlic powder. Mix together. If you want to replace the garlic powder with freshly minced garlic that will take it to the next level and if you want a kick of spice use 1-2 tsp of Sriracha depending on how much spice you can handle. Finally, adding a touch of rice wine vinegar gives it a nice edge and will make the salmon more tender.

4. Broil- Put foil over a sheet pan (shiny side up, matte side down), put the defrosted salmon on top and pour all the sauce over the salmon filet. Place in oven for 10 minutes.


5. Remove- Turn oven off after 10 minutes and let the salmon sit for 2 more minutes in the oven with the heat OFF, then remove.


Scared to invest in some key ingredients like garlic powder, hoisin and soy sauce? Fair enough, let me give you a few suggestions on what you can do with them in the future.

Soy Sauce- marinades, marinades, marinades. Soy sauce can be used to marinate ANY type of meat from pork to fish. If you are gluten averse you can use Tamari. Is your chicken tasteless? Throw it in the fridge with some soy sauce overnight and cook it the next day, that’s it just meat + soy sauce. Obviously, if you like Asian foods it can also be used in salad dressing and stir-fry sauces.

Rice Wine Vinegar is great for:
Marinades
Salad dressing
To pickle vegetables

Garlic Powder is great for:
Great seasoning on any type of meat cooked any way (Grilled, stir-fry, etc)
Marinades
Salad dressing
Anytime you use salt, you can consider pairing it with garlic powder

Lemon is great for:
Marinade
Salad dressing
Garnish
Add to drinking water
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Old 06-10-2014, 07:44 AM   #13
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Ah salmon and the love hate relationship I have with it. Smoked as in lox and nova or gravlax on the love side with prepared any other way on the hate side.

Welcome to DC!
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Old 06-10-2014, 08:01 AM   #14
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2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees on “broil”

My oven doesn't preheat to a particular temperature when set to broil.

What height is the oven rack?

The flavors seem yummy but the salmon would be way overdone for my taste.

I do salmon similarly quite often with miso instead of hoisin.

Your sauce would be a good marinade for grilled chicken, too
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Old 06-10-2014, 11:01 AM   #15
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I'm 65 years old and have been cooking since early childhood and do all of the home cooking (and food shopping, of course), which is just fine with my wife. I'm also a technical cook and apply a fair amount of science to cooking. But I am always a beginner. Beginners stay open to every sort of new knowledge and always make an effort to improve technique.

The two specific excuses you list are common ones, but they aren't valid excuses. There are indeed those who have limited time to cook. But we are routinely are served meals in restaurants within a few minutes of ordering, and many of them do not require the assistance of heavily prepped ingredients and assistants or high-power equipment. Those with only a few minutes to prepare a meal have to learn appropriate meals and shop for them, but there is no reason to presume the meals are compromised by being quick to prepare.

And if you have a couple of pots and pans, a sharp knife and a heat source capable of boiling water, you have enough equipment. Julia Child's Boeuf Bourguignon that loomed so large in Julie and Julia? Requires what? One skillet, one oven-safe pot, dutch oven, or casserole, a knife and a spoon. If I planned well, I could eliminate the skillet.

There are things that are nice to have. Proper mashed potatoes are unlikely without a ricer or something similar. (If you know the physics of potato cooking, you can get away with a potato masher.) But even if you add the things that are commonly nice to have, the list isn't long or expensive. (I say this, even though I have a bunch of cooking stuff, but you get the idea.) You can cook no end of stunning meals with what you could put in a grocery bag and a camp fire.

You're right, though. Tackling a dish that's really good but pretty unlikely to fail completely, like the salmon, builds confidence. (Salmon presents the classic problem of avoiding overcooking and an opportunity to learn something about your oven.) Even more confidence comes with taking on deceptively simple things that are notoriously easy to screw up and, by screwing up and trying again, become reliable skills. There was at least one acclaimed restaurant where the screening for a prospective new chef was just to make a perfect omelet.

Welcome. It's a journey.

Oh. And here's a tip on salmon. You know that white gunk that tends to ooze out of salmon as it cooks? Can spoil the presentation. It's worst when the fish is cold when the heat is applied and also when high heat is used. Soak the fish for ten minutes in a brine of one tablespoon of salt to a cup of room temp water, rinse and dry. No more white stuff. Works on other fish, too.

The science here is that the salt, which penetrates only the barest surface of the fish, affects the muscle fibers near the surface so that they don't contract and squeeze out the albumen that appears congealed as the white stuff. Plus, the bath tends to bring the fish up to room temperature, which helps.
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Old 06-10-2014, 02:16 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLC View Post
I'm 65 years old and have been cooking since early childhood and do all of the home cooking (and food shopping, of course), which is just fine with my wife. I'm also a technical cook and apply a fair amount of science to cooking. But I am always a beginner. Beginners stay open to every sort of new knowledge and always make an effort to improve technique.

The two specific excuses you list are common ones, but they aren't valid excuses. There are indeed those who have limited time to cook. But we are routinely are served meals in restaurants within a few minutes of ordering, and many of them do not require the assistance of heavily prepped ingredients and assistants or high-power equipment. Those with only a few minutes to prepare a meal have to learn appropriate meals and shop for them, but there is no reason to presume the meals are compromised by being quick to prepare.

And if you have a couple of pots and pans, a sharp knife and a heat source capable of boiling water, you have enough equipment. Julia Child's Boeuf Bourguignon that loomed so large in Julie and Julia? Requires what? One skillet, one oven-safe pot, dutch oven, or casserole, a knife and a spoon. If I planned well, I could eliminate the skillet.

There are things that are nice to have. Proper mashed potatoes are unlikely without a ricer or something similar. (If you know the physics of potato cooking, you can get away with a potato masher.) But even if you add the things that are commonly nice to have, the list isn't long or expensive. (I say this, even though I have a bunch of cooking stuff, but you get the idea.) You can cook no end of stunning meals with what you could put in a grocery bag and a camp fire.

You're right, though. Tackling a dish that's really good but pretty unlikely to fail completely, like the salmon, builds confidence. (Salmon presents the classic problem of avoiding overcooking and an opportunity to learn something about your oven.) Even more confidence comes with taking on deceptively simple things that are notoriously easy to screw up and, by screwing up and trying again, become reliable skills. There was at least one acclaimed restaurant where the screening for a prospective new chef was just to make a perfect omelet.

Welcome. It's a journey.

Oh. And here's a tip on salmon. You know that white gunk that tends to ooze out of salmon as it cooks? Can spoil the presentation. It's worst when the fish is cold when the heat is applied and also when high heat is used. Soak the fish for ten minutes in a brine of one tablespoon of salt to a cup of room temp water, rinse and dry. No more white stuff. Works on other fish, too.

The science here is that the salt, which penetrates only the barest surface of the fish, affects the muscle fibers near the surface so that they don't contract and squeeze out the albumen that appears congealed as the white stuff. Plus, the bath tends to bring the fish up to room temperature, which helps.
That's great feedback thank you! And I have always wondered about that white gunk I will try that tip next time!!
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Old 06-10-2014, 02:38 PM   #17
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Hi Katrins, welcome to DC.

I've been cooking since I was about 9 (not counting "helping" mother from about the age of 4, rolling out bits of pastry and filling them with jam "for Daddy's tea") and I'm 65 now and I still find myself learning new things.

DC is especially interesting to me because it's American and I'm English so there's always something new for me to learn (and I hope I can sometimes bring something new to everyone else).
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Old 06-10-2014, 04:26 PM   #18
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I've been in the kitchen since the 60's. I'm here for that pleasant "give and take." I'll 'give' encouragement and suggestions to new cooks as well as 'take' advice and suggestions from those of you who have been at it either professionally or longer than I have.
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Old 06-10-2014, 06:04 PM   #19
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Every time I place a cooking utensil on the stove I'm beginning to cook.

Anything you care to share that will expand my knowledge and/or my taste experience is welcome.

Welcome to DC.

And don't get frustrated with old dog new tricks.
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Old 06-12-2014, 11:16 AM   #20
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Kr. I think you are going to find that you are not as accomplished as you might think. Or you may find you are most accomplished. On this forum, you will find out very quickly.
Please do not take this comment the wrong way. Let me explain myself.

When I joined this forum, I expected it to be a DIY forum with folks needing help.
Turns out many people on this forum do this as their day/night job and others are culinary trained chefs that work only at home. The vast majority of the regular members are accomplished cooks. Very smart and know the business of cooking inside and out.

What you have stumbled upon is a group of serious chefs and some who could be chefs.
I found out in a hurry I did not know squat compared to many of these people.
So, while we look forward to your advice and techniques and teachings, remember you will be parroting things discussed and dissected over and over again on this forum for quite a few years now.
"Preaching to the choir" comes to mind.

The point I am making is this is not a beginners site. We have some beginners, but by far most of the regular members are well versed cooks and chefs.
So, expect questions and comments.

Now, to the broil on 350. What does that mean?
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