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Old 12-08-2017, 01:38 AM   #1
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Changing from volume to weight

I have recently started to weigh my ingredients instead of measuring them, for baking anyway. I知 also struggling through the math of cooking by ratio; I知 not a math guy, and the simplest arithmetic can drive me nuts!

I just stumbled on this website. It has a volume to weight conversion doohickey; you can enter the volume of your ingredient, choose the ingredient, and it will tell the weight of the volume. My descriptive skills have waned in the last few months. It would probably be better if you just visit the site, if you haven稚 already!

Flour volume vs weight conversions | Grams | Ounces | Cups | Pounds | Kilograms | Quarts

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Old 12-08-2017, 09:05 AM   #2
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Nice site.

If you check out the nutrition label on a bag of flour or other food product, it gives you the conversion. It'll say something like: Serving Size シ Cup (30 grams).
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Old 12-08-2017, 10:08 PM   #3
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I think the best strategy is to be able to use a recipe whether it uses quantity or weight. I never try to convert one to the other, but I have the tools I need to execute a recipe that uses either method for measuring amounts of ingredients.

Don't make cooking or baking any harder than it needs to be.

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Old 12-09-2017, 11:02 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
I think the best strategy is to be able to use a recipe whether it uses quantity or weight. I never try to convert one to the other, but I have the tools I need to execute a recipe that uses either method for measuring amounts of ingredients.

Don't make cooking or baking any harder than it needs to be.
+1..
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Old 12-09-2017, 02:08 PM   #5
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You don't need to be a whiz in math to use baker's percentages. Basically, baker's percentages indicate quantities of each ingredient needed if you have 100 lb of flour. Most of us don't. The percentage of each ingredient is its total weight divided by the weight of the flour. Always weigh your flour(s) first. That is your 100℅. Weight of ingredient over weight of flour x 100℅ = ℅ of ingredient. I taught a 10-yr old how to make bread using baker's percentages. Once you have the weight of the flour, everything else should fall into place.
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Old 12-09-2017, 06:45 PM   #6
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you cannot convert from volume to weight. they are not related in math . so you have choose one or the other.

1 cup of molten iron, has no relation to 1 cup of 16 fluid ounzes of water.

and try to consider 1 table spoon of something?

I know nothing about bakeing, and do not own a kitchen scale.

Eric, Austin Tx.
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Old 12-09-2017, 07:16 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giggler View Post
you cannot convert from volume to weight. they are not related in math . so you have choose one or the other.

1 cup of molten iron, has no relation to 1 cup of 16 fluid ounzes of water.

and try to consider 1 table spoon of something?

I know nothing about bakeing, and do not own a kitchen scale.

Eric, Austin Tx.
Every single food ingredient that has volume also has a corresponding weight. There is no universal conversion factor for all ingredients but there are individual ones.

For example, professional and home bakers have been using weight to measure flour rather than volume for some time.
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Old 12-09-2017, 07:25 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by giggler View Post
you cannot convert from volume to weight. they are not related in math . so you have choose one or the other.

1 cup of molten iron, has no relation to 1 cup of 16 fluid ounzes of water.

and try to consider 1 table spoon of something?

I know nothing about bakeing, and do not own a kitchen scale.
There is no single formula to convert ingredients from volume to weight, but that doesn't mean there's no way to determine the weight of a given volume of something. The website Joel linked to uses the known weight per volume unit of different types of flour and uses that to do the conversion.

I use recipe software called Living Cookbook. It can display measurements in weights or volumes, which it gets from a nutrition database provided by the USDA. It's updated every year.

http://www.livingcookbook.com
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Old 12-09-2017, 07:32 PM   #9
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Sorry, Andy, didn't mean to essentially repeat what you said
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Old 12-09-2017, 07:44 PM   #10
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Sorry, Andy, didn't mean to essentially repeat what you said
No problem.
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