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Old 04-09-2015, 11:36 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Sometimes it affects the cooking process too. If I make a recipe that calls for very specific cooking times for each ingredient as it's added, then it's important that they be fairly close to the recommended size, and that all pieces for each addition are the same size, or the required and expected textures (doneness) will be inconsistent. This is particularly true for a fast cooking item like zucchini or yellow summer squash. Inconsistent piece sizes means that either the large pieces will be half raw, or the smaller ones will be mush - if the pieces are sufficiently uneven, the dish can cover the entire range.
Although it may not have been clear, I was talking about irregularly shaped pieces that all have about the same surface areas but are not neat little cubes. i agree uniform sizes result in all parts of the product evenly cooked.
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Old 04-10-2015, 12:17 AM   #12
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Although it may not have been clear, I was talking about irregularly shaped pieces that all have about the same surface areas but are not neat little cubes. i agree uniform sizes result in all parts of the product evenly cooked.
I can see your point Andy. If I am making a salad, then I would like the red pepper, celery, onion and any other addition except the lettuce to be all the same size. It makes for a better appearance. And eating experience.
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Old 04-10-2015, 11:13 AM   #13
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Of course there is more to knife prep than just chop and dice.

Typically I see and use the term "rough chop" when I don't care about size and want larger chunks, like when I'm making stock or something that I'm going to simmer for a long time, then discard the remaining solids.

Other than this "chop" can be almost any size and shape, depending on need and the type of ingredient. "Mince" is usually a very fine chop.

Dice is a more precise term. The first step in a good dice is cutting the ingredient into the proper sized strips or sticks. I'm going to get more technical now, because we have to throw in the names and sizes of the "strips" that are further chopped into the different dice sizes.

Strips or Sticks
Visualize strips as typically 2" long with a square cross section. They are then stacked and cut crosswise to make different size cubes, or "dice".

Allumette - 1/2" x 1/2" (Large dice)

Baton - 3/8" x 3/8" (Medium dice)

Batonette - 1/4" x 1/4" (Fine dice)

Julienne - 1/8" x 1/8" (Brunois)

Then there is chiffonade, which is where you take a leafy herb like basil or Italian parsley and roll the leaves into a wad, then finely slice the bundle into 1/16"-1/8" strips, making shreds rather than a full chop or mince.

I hope that I have now managed to totally confuse the topic.


Another thought: Which came first, the food prep dice or the gaming dice?
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Old 04-10-2015, 11:21 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Of course there is more to knife prep than just chop and dice.


I hope that I have now managed to totally confuse the topic.
Another thought: Which came first, the food prep dice or the gaming dice?
Yup. You succeeded. Good job.
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Old 04-10-2015, 01:11 PM   #15
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Is there a difference between chop vegatables and dice? I looked it up and said chop is cut into peices that do not need uniform shape or size. Dice of course is of uniform shape and size.... Squares. Problem having is when they say chop they show cutting lengthwise than crosswise on say a potatoe. Result is squares so how can it be chop if chop is of no uniform shape or size? Also read people say chop is bigger than a dice, dice smaller than chop, and minced smaller than both. Again how is the above true if chop has no shape or size that is uniform? Then there is chopped chocalate no way is this diced . Could some one please explain help with this . Thanks
Basically, chop means don't worry about size and shape just render it into bits. Dice means be more precise. If you diced perfectly you would have a fair amount of waste but in chopping you would have some out of shape pieces but no waste.

In practice, unless you where training at the cordon bleu school, it doesn't really matter. In most cookery books the terms are interchangeable so do your own thing.

As for size, you cut to the size that fits what you want your finished dish to look like.

Stop worrying about the trivial things and give your attention to the whole dish.
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Old 04-10-2015, 02:36 PM   #16
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Sound advice for everyone Mad Cook.
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Old 04-10-2015, 04:45 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
...

Strips or Sticks
Visualize strips as typically 2" long with a square cross section. They are then stacked and cut crosswise to make different size cubes, or "dice".

Allumette - 1/2" x 1/2" (Large dice)

Baton - 3/8" x 3/8" (Medium dice)

Batonette - 1/4" x 1/4" (Fine dice)

Julienne - 1/8" x 1/8" (Brunois)

Then there is chiffonade, which is where you take a leafy herb like basil or Italian parsley and roll the leaves into a wad, then finely slice the bundle into 1/16"-1/8" strips, making shreds rather than a full chop or mince.

I hope that I have now managed to totally confuse the topic.


Another thought: Which came first, the food prep dice or the gaming dice?
I was startled that "allumette" (French for match) would be as large as 1/2"x1/2", so I looked at a bunch of Google results. Most of them wrote that it was 1/4"x1/4". I still find that a bit thick for something called a matchstick cut. A few sites said it could also be 1/8"x1/8". That's more the size of all the wooden matchsticks I have ever seen.
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Old 04-10-2015, 04:58 PM   #18
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I was startled that "allumette" (French for match) would be as large as 1/2"x1/2", so I looked at a bunch of Google results. Most of them wrote that it was 1/4"x1/4". I still find that a bit thick for something called a matchstick cut. A few sites said it could also be 1/8"x1/8". That's more the size of all the wooden matchsticks I have ever seen.
Yes, I thought that allumettes are smaller than given above and I agree about them looking like matchsticks
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Old 05-23-2015, 10:38 PM   #19
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Chop vs dice

Can any one help me to understand this? When I think of chop, I think of either rough chop, chop....bite size ( being diced or like a food chopper little pieces here and there) or finely chop. That's my thinking when see or hear the word chop.My confusion is when they say chop vegetables and they include dice and slice and strips of food, how is this classified as a chop? When chop is what I said before. How does one know which one they are referring to, if they say in recipe chop vegetables what they mean? Not over thinking this just like to know how they include slice or dice or julienne as chop vegetable. Thanks ahead of time if any of you try to shed some light on this.
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Old 05-23-2015, 11:27 PM   #20
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Can any one help me to understand this? When I think of chop, I think of either rough chop, chop....bite size ( being diced or like a food chopper little pieces here and there) or finely chop. That's my thinking when see or hear the word chop.My confusion is when they say chop vegetables and they include dice and slice and strips of food, how is this classified as a chop? When chop is what I said before. How does one know which one they are referring to, if they say in recipe chop vegetables what they mean? Not over thinking this just like to know how they include slice or dice or julienne as chop vegetable. Thanks ahead of time if any of you try to shed some light on this.
mumu, have you gone back and re-read this thread? I can't imagine anything more explanatory than what's been offered here. Just have fun cooking, and don't worry about the exact size of your dice or chop.
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