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Old 04-09-2015, 11:08 AM   #1
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Chop vs dice

Is there a difference between chop vegatables and dice? I looked it up and said chop is cut into peices that do not need uniform shape or size. Dice of course is of uniform shape and size.... Squares. Problem having is when they say chop they show cutting lengthwise than crosswise on say a potatoe. Result is squares so how can it be chop if chop is of no uniform shape or size? Also read people say chop is bigger than a dice, dice smaller than chop, and minced smaller than both. Again how is the above true if chop has no shape or size that is uniform? Then there is chopped chocalate no way is this diced . Could some one please explain help with this . Thanks

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Old 04-09-2015, 12:14 PM   #2
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I can see where it can be confusing and vague in some instances. Let me explain how I view it.

As an example I'm going to use my family's bread stuffing recipe and a recipe for potato salad, which incorporates onion, potatoes, celery hard-boiled eggs. The stuffing includes, green pepper, celery and onions.

In the case of the stuffing, I could care less how the veggies look but I want them cut up so that they can be mixed fairly uniformly in the stuffing. This is where I chop them. I go about it in a somewhat willy-nilly fashion. Whacking and chopping, but keeping an eye toward making sure the pieces are fairly uniform. In no way are they little cubes. I can hold my own with a nice sharp knife, but I'm decidedly not the kind of chopper, slicer, dicer, etc. as seen on the cooking shows on TV.

As for the potato salad, it is scrutinized more closely than stuffing so this is when I dice my vegetables. Cut them into long, uniform strips, then cut them into cubes as similarly as I can manage. This is what I understand as dicing.

Now, when it comes to size of dice. In many instances, it's up to the person preparing the dish/recipe and their personal preference. But, many recipes direct you to cut into a specific size. That is 1-inch dice, 1/2-inch dice, etc. That makes the preparer's job much easier because they have some guidance.

Hope this helps.
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Old 04-09-2015, 01:04 PM   #3
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This should explain it. This is how it was taught in the techniques class I took:

Chop vs Dice vs Mince
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Old 04-09-2015, 01:54 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
This should explain it. This is how it was taught in the techniques class I took:

Chop vs Dice vs Mince
Sounds good to me.
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Old 04-09-2015, 09:22 PM   #5
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Chop vs dice

Would some of the cooks out there be willing to take a look at this and tell me if this is ok to go by or follow in regards to dice vs chop. I google chop vs dice and it came up with Miss Rules: chop vs dice. I can't get my I pad to copy paste. But it is called Miss Rules : chop vs dice. .....thanks in advance.
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Old 04-09-2015, 09:30 PM   #6
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Chop vs dice

Miss Rules: Chop vs. Dice. Here it is it .
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Old 04-09-2015, 09:55 PM   #7
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A potato salad recipe will tell you to cut your potatoes into what is for me rather large cubes. I have a rather small mouth, so I cut all my foods to fit into my mouth with ease. Yet I will put the onion into my small food processor and let it rip. A lot of folks do not like to bite into a piece of raw onion. It comes out as a real fine dice.

I don't worry about the size of the food in a recipe. I am more concerned that it will fit into someone's mouth. For strong flavored foods, they are diced to the point that you cannot pick it out of the dish, yet it is an ingredient that enhances the flavor.
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Old 04-09-2015, 09:58 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by mumu View Post
Would some of the cooks out there be willing to take a look at this and tell me if this is ok to go by or follow in regards to dice vs chop. I google chop vs dice and it came up with Miss Rules: chop vs dice. I can't get my I pad to copy paste. But it is called Miss Rules : chop vs dice. .....thanks in advance.

I think that link is OK to go by or follow.

This isn't science. You cut up food so the flavors can be extracted and so they are an appropriate size for the dish you're cooking. A beef stew, for example, would be fine with larger pieces of food while a salsa would be better with smaller pieces.

Uniform size and shape are important only for appearance.
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Old 04-09-2015, 11:02 PM   #9
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Uniform size and shape are important only for appearance.
Sometimes it affects the cooking process too. If I make a recipe that calls for very specific cooking times for each ingredient as it's added, then it's important that they be fairly close to the recommended size, and that all pieces for each addition are the same size, or the required and expected textures (doneness) will be inconsistent. This is particularly true for a fast cooking item like zucchini or yellow summer squash. Inconsistent piece sizes means that either the large pieces will be half raw, or the smaller ones will be mush - if the pieces are sufficiently uneven, the dish can cover the entire range.
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Old 04-09-2015, 11:34 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Sometimes it affects the cooking process too. If I make a recipe that calls for very specific cooking times for each ingredient as it's added, then it's important that they be fairly close to the recommended size, and that all pieces for each addition are the same size, or the required and expected textures (doneness) will be inconsistent. This is particularly true for a fast cooking item like zucchini or yellow summer squash. Inconsistent piece sizes means that either the large pieces will be half raw, or the smaller ones will be mush - if the pieces are sufficiently uneven, the dish can cover the entire range.
True RP. When I make beef stew, I like to have the potato sized small enough to fit into my mouth. And don't want to have to remember to add them later than the carrots. So I cut the carrots much smaller than most folks will, yet cut the potatoes the way I like them. Then they can all go into the pot at the same time. Put a cover on the pot and let it simmer. Now all I have to remember is to go back and stir it a couple of times. Both the carrots and potatoes are ready to eat at the same time.
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