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Old 07-01-2015, 12:35 PM   #1
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Cooking Creole

TLDR? I need some help making some Cajun/Creole dishes and would really like some help with recipes on seasoning mixes to help get me there. Recipes for simple recipes like red beans & rice, gumbo, jambalaya etc are most welcome.

I find it funny that you can take about 8 spices and they define barbecue. I'm good at barbecue. If you change the ratio, you get blackening seasoning. If you change them a little more, you get a Cajun/Creole seasoning. I know my way around the grill and I have one or two seasoning mixes that I've made that are perfect, (to me). They are great on pork, chicken, and ribs. I take these same ingredients and try to make a Cajun/Creole seasoning, and it always fails. I've tried chicken gumbo, bourbon chicken, jambalaya, all from scratch. They are all one-dimensional and I didn't want to finish the servings. It's like the rice soaks up all of the seasoning and the rest of the dish is just sort of blah. Please help.

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Old 07-01-2015, 03:01 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by inchrisin View Post
TLDR? I need some help making some Cajun/Creole dishes and would really like some help with recipes on seasoning mixes to help get me there. Recipes for simple recipes like red beans & rice, gumbo, jambalaya etc are most welcome.

I find it funny that you can take about 8 spices and they define barbecue. I'm good at barbecue. If you change the ratio, you get blackening seasoning. If you change them a little more, you get a Cajun/Creole seasoning. I know my way around the grill and I have one or two seasoning mixes that I've made that are perfect, (to me). They are great on pork, chicken, and ribs. I take these same ingredients and try to make a Cajun/Creole seasoning, and it always fails. I've tried chicken gumbo, bourbon chicken, jambalaya, all from scratch. They are all one-dimensional and I didn't want to finish the servings. It's like the rice soaks up all of the seasoning and the rest of the dish is just sort of blah. Please help.
I rely mainly on Prudhomme, Lagasse and Wilson. Especially Prudhomme. The spice blends are right on. Don't buy premixed! I know both Prudhomme and Lagasse offer them. Two ingredients, Andouille sausage and Tasso ham are just as key as the Trinity in most of the dishes you listed. Dirty Rice is another great dish.

If you don't have any of the cookbooks from the three, PM me and I'll give you recipes for Rustic Rub etc. Also if you want good store bought mixes, try Tony Chachere's.
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Old 07-01-2015, 04:34 PM   #3
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I'm a fan of Prudhomme's recipes as well. Look for a copy of his book. Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen. It was originally published in the 1980s and has all the individual spices listed in his recipes rather than his proprietary spice blends. I found my copy at a flea market for $3.
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Old 07-01-2015, 04:40 PM   #4
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Cajun and Creole are two different cultures - Not the same basis for Culinary dishes. Cajun is primarily based on French/Spanish roots. French via Nova Scotia (Acadia) and Spanish (European) explorers/entrepreneurs. Creole is has its Caribbean black African roots using New World (Caribbean island) spices. Gumbo, if done right, is multidimensional in flavors.
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Old 07-02-2015, 06:17 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
Cajun and Creole are two different cultures - Not the same basis for Culinary dishes. Cajun is primarily based on French/Spanish roots. French via Nova Scotia (Acadia) and Spanish (European) explorers/entrepreneurs. Creole is has its Caribbean black African roots using New World (Caribbean island) spices. Gumbo, if done right, is multidimensional in flavors.
I have to disagree in part. Creole was the term given to the descendants of the settlers from France, Spain, Portugal, etc., usually people of at least some means (a lot of "second" sons of wealthy families). Creole food came about because the Old World ladies had trouble reproducing their recipes in the New World due to some things just not being available or available in quantity, and ended up having to rely on their slaves/domestics to help them adapt to what was readily available, as well as the "melting pot" effect of the different cultures. So, the original roots of Creole were actually Old World, with the addition/substitution of New World products and the African/Caribbean black influence.

The easiest way to differentiate between Cajun and Creole food is that Cajun is more country-style cooking and Creole is more city-style cooking. However, as time goes by, the 2 are merging more and more and becoming less distinct.
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Old 07-02-2015, 07:01 AM   #6
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Is your mother's second language English and first language Cajun? Was your grandmother the official Cajun interpreter at the largest hospital in New Orleans? Do you have a branch of your family who, even though they were born in the Louisiana Bayou, never learned to speak English and still hold original Louisiana Purchase land grants? Do you have direct descendents of the first and real Spanish pirates of the Caribbean in your immediate family? etc., etc, etc?
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Old 07-02-2015, 11:02 AM   #7
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Are you going to help me, or just flaunt?
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Old 07-02-2015, 11:57 AM   #8
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Come to Chinatown, ask for Caine. I will help you:

Cajun Mustard
Ingredients:
  • 2 oz dry mustard
  • 1 Tbs flour or cornstarch
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 3 Tbs white wine vinegar
  • 1 Tbs honey
  • 1 Tbs crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tsp coarse black pepper
  • 1 tsp paprika
Instructions:

Combine the dry mustard and flour. Gradually stir in 1/4 cup cold water and let stand 15 minutes. Stir in the remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly. Makes about ½ cup.

Cajun Potato Salad

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds red skinned potatoes, scrubbed and peeled, cut in 1-inch chunks
  • 6 hard-boiled eggs, coarsely chopped
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, diced
  • 1 green pepper, diced
  • 2 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ½ cup Cajun mustard
  • ¾ cup mayonnaise (less or more to taste)
  • Salt to taste
  • Cajun seasoning, for garnish
Instructions:

Place potatoes in a large pot, cover with cold water by an inch. (If you haven't already hard boiled the eggs, you can boil the eggs with the potatoes.) Bring to a boil and add about a teaspoon of salt. Lower the heat to a simmer and cover. Cook until the potatoes are fork tender, about 10 minutes. Drain in a colander
While you are boiling the potatoes, mix the sugar, vinegar, mayonnaise and mustard in with the celery, peppers and onion in a large bowl
While the potatoes are still warm, gently mix them in with the dressing. Stirring them in while warm will allow the potatoes to soak in the seasonings better
Gently fold the chopped hard boiled eggs into the potato mixture until well combined. Taste the potato salad and add salt to taste. Put the salad in the fridge for at least an hour before serving. Serve chilled, garnished with Cajun seasoning
CREOLE SAUCE
Ingredients:
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup chopped onions, about 1/2 medium onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped green bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped yellow or red bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons Creole seasoning
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried leaf thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried leaf oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried leaf basil
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 can (14.5 ounces each) diced tomatoes with juice
  • 1 can (approx. 1 2/3 cups) chicken broth
  • 4 green onions, sliced, with most of green
  • 1 heaping tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons butter
Instructions:

In a medium saucepan, heat butter and oil over medium low heat. Add chopped garlic, onions, peppers, and celery. Sauté vegetables for about 2 minutes, until just tender.
Combine paprika, Creole seasoning, thyme, oregano, basil, Worcestershire sauce, hot sauce, and ground pepper in a small cup. Stir tomatoes into the vegetables then add the seasoning mixture. Sauté for 1 minute longer. Add chicken stock and bring to a boil. Stir in the sliced green onions. Continue boiling, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Most of the liquid will cook away. Stir in the tomato paste until blended in. Remove from heat and stir in the 2 tablespoons butter.
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Old 07-02-2015, 12:31 PM   #9
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These are the seasonings I blend, but you can search the internet and find all kinds of Cajun and Creole seasoning mix recipes. Just pick one you think looks good, mix some up and taste it.




CajunSeasoning Mix



Ingredients:
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp granulated garlic
  • 2 ½ tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp granulated onion
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1¼ tsp dried oregano
  • 1¼ tsp dried thyme
  • ½ tsp red pepper flakes
Instructions:
Combineall ingredients until thoroughly blended. Store in an air tightcontainer.



CreoleSeasoning Mix


Ingredients:
  • 2 ½ Tbs paprika
  • 2 Tbs granulated garlic
  • 1 Tbs salt
  • 1 Tbs granulated onion
  • 1 Tbs dried oregano
  • 1 Tbs dried thyme
  • 1 Tbs cayenne pepper
  • 1 Tbs freshly ground black pepper
Instructions:
Combineall ingredients until thoroughly blended. Store in an air tightcontainer.
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Old 07-02-2015, 01:03 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
Is your mother's second language English and first language Cajun? Was your grandmother the official Cajun interpreter at the largest hospital in New Orleans? Do you have a branch of your family who, even though they were born in the Louisiana Bayou, never learned to speak English and still hold original Louisiana Purchase land grants? Do you have direct descendents of the first and real Spanish pirates of the Caribbean in your immediate family? etc., etc, etc?
Back it up with facts, not folklore. I can cite dozens of references (reliable ones, not Wikipedia) and by people who have all that and more. Can you? Here's just a few.

History | Creole & Cajun Cuisine | Langlois
Talks about the definitions of Creoles and Cajuns. About Creole food having Spanish/French origins.

Louisiana's Food Traditions: An Insider's Guide
Talks about gumbo being based on bouillabaisse, with African soup preference reinforcing the tradition. New Orleans being best known for CREOLE cooking and Cajun being the simpler food of country folk.

New Orleans Creole or Cajun? Here's how to tell - CNN.com
Again talks about differences between Cajun and Creole people and food.

Experience Great Cajun & Creole Food and Recipes with Chef John Folse & Co.
As above.

Cajun vs. Creole | Escoffier School of Culinary
As above.

There are a lot more sources that cite basically the same things.
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