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Old 12-07-2006, 05:50 PM   #11
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Sorry about not answering sooner. I had to dash out for a bit. I only suggested butter for flavor, no other reason. Oil is fine.

You have got the perfect advice from these three fine gentlemen, so I have nothing further to add.

skilletlicker, you made me ROFL with the burnt tongue and the other "bad things". Thanks!
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Old 12-07-2006, 05:51 PM   #12
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There is one area where GW and I disagree. That's about when you should add the oil to the pan. GW says to add the oil after the pan reaches temperature. Then you wait for the oil to get hot before you add the food.

I say you can add the oil to a cold pan and heat them to temperature together. I have performed tests in my kitchen that prove to me that there is no difference. The food doesn't know what temperature the pan was when the oil was added.

Bottom line, both the pan and the oil must be hot before the food is added.

You decide which version of the truth you will follow.

GW, your turn.
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Old 12-07-2006, 06:40 PM   #13
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Alix: thanks for the help.

Andy: the "care" pamphlet that came with my fry pan said to add the oil to the cold pan, so that's what I did when I cooked the fish. I agree with you, it doesn't seem like it should matter when the oil is added.

GW: I just fried some chicken tenders for lunch and they came out great! Wonderful browning and perfectly tender and juicy. I added the oil in after the pan was hot and it worked out nicely!
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Old 12-07-2006, 08:24 PM   #14
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the Hot Pan/cold oil legend is mainly for raw cast iron or carbon steel or polished untreated aluminum....to expand the pores and seal with the cold oil. On those metals the system works. No such need with enameled iron or steel or anodized aluminum or silver stone or stainless.
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Old 12-07-2006, 09:33 PM   #15
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My solution....don't use EVOO to fry in....try peanut oil.
Then do the heat the pan add the oil routine. Also I would use more oil than "just to coat the bottom" I'm not talking "deep fry" mind you...say 1/4 in.
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Old 12-07-2006, 10:12 PM   #16
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The best thing that I have learned is in the breading routine before cooking. I tried it and it made a huge difference. After you have breaded whatever it is, you have to give it some drying time. Maybe five minutes...not long.
I cooked catfish nuggets not long ago and they came out very good. Another thing I have learned about frying foods "don't crowd the pan". I never know if my skillets are going to stick or not so I spray them with cooking spray while they are cold and add the oil (usually vegetable) room temp. I heat my oil on medium which for you is probably temp setting 5.
On an electric stove, you can have one burner on medium and another on high 7-8. Although the oil may appear to be hot enough to cook, the skillet may not actually be as hot. It's best to set aside about 10 minutes to heat the oil so the skillet is also hot. If you put food in hot oil and a cold skillet, you get SOG. YUK!
When your skillet and oil are heated (and I would recommend getting a thermometer), place your skillet on the high burner for about 2 minutes. Usually, I fry one piece before I make a batch and I place that piece in the center of the pan. I flip it when I see light brown around the edges.
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Old 12-08-2006, 01:14 AM   #17
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Your method sounds fine- someone suggested you shake the pan a little immediately after you put your fish into the hot oil. I have to second that suggestion. I add cold oil to hot pans, and cold oil to old pans and heat them up together, and it doesn't seeme to make much difference most of the time, but one thing i always do is shake the pan. As was stated above, it allows some oil to get between the surface of the meat/fish and prevent sticking. After that, just leave it alone. Only the initial shaking is necesary.
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Old 12-08-2006, 06:57 AM   #18
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i'll agree with andym on the oil question. although i tend to heat up pans first, i've never noticed any difference one way or the other.

i'll second gw on the shaking. actually, if it's something that i think may stick, i'm shaking the pan as i place whatever it is in the pan, and continue for at least 1/2 minute or 1 minute, until the outter part has been seared.

finally, i'm going to disagree with stirblue. well, i agree that the breading should be dry, but that's why i'm going to say to get things in the pan immediately. in my experience, a dusting of flour will become moist in a short time, and can lead to sticking. if you need to do a lot of breading and have them waiting around for a while, give them a very generous coating, and then knock off the extra just before placing in the pan.
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Old 12-08-2006, 10:20 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
There is one area where GW and I disagree. That's about when you should add the oil to the pan. GW says to add the oil after the pan reaches temperature. Then you wait for the oil to get hot before you add the food.

I say you can add the oil to a cold pan and heat them to temperature together. I have performed tests in my kitchen that prove to me that there is no difference. The food doesn't know what temperature the pan was when the oil was added.

Bottom line, both the pan and the oil must be hot before the food is added.

You decide which version of the truth you will follow.

GW, your turn.
Andy; I won't disagree. Maybe it's the pan quality that is making the difference. I'm using inexpensive SS, not the good stuff. But with my pans, again through experimentation, I get better results by adding the fat after the pan is hot. With my cast-iron, it makes no difference. So it could be that with a higher quality of SS pan, it would make no difference.

Seeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 12-13-2006, 08:46 PM   #20
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I agree with skilletlicker. and Andy..and a good rule add 2 tablespoons of EVOO.
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